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Experimental investigation of the effect of polymer matrices on polymer fibre optic oxygen sensors and their time response characteristics using a vacuum testing chamber and a liquid flow apparatus.

Chen R, Formenti F, McPeak H, Obeid AN, Hahn C, Farmery A - Sens Actuators B Chem (2016)

Bottom Line: Previous attempts to design fast intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensors for use in physiology and medicine have failed to meet the criteria that are now required in modern investigations.In this article, we present an inexpensive polymer type fibre-optic, oxygen sensor that is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional electrochemical oxygen sensors.It is constructed with biologically inert polymer materials and is both sufficiently small and robust for direct insertion in to a human artery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nuffield Division of Anaesthetics, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.

ABSTRACT

Very fast sensors that are able to track rapid changes in oxygen partial pressure (PO2) in the gas and liquid phases are increasingly required in scientific research - particularly in the life sciences. Recent interest in monitoring very fast changes in the PO2 of arterial blood in some respiratory failure conditions is one such example. Previous attempts to design fast intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensors for use in physiology and medicine have failed to meet the criteria that are now required in modern investigations. However, miniature photonic devices are capable of meeting this need. In this article, we present an inexpensive polymer type fibre-optic, oxygen sensor that is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional electrochemical oxygen sensors. It is constructed with biologically inert polymer materials and is both sufficiently small and robust for direct insertion in to a human artery. The sensors were tested and evaluated in both a gas testing chamber and in a flowing liquid test system. The results showed a very fast T 90 response time, typically circa 20 ms when tested in the gas phase, and circa 100 ms in flowing liquid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical plots of PO2 versus time for fibre optic oxygen sensors manufactured from three different polymer matrices to a step change in PO2 from 3 kPa to 21 kPa.
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fig0015: Typical plots of PO2 versus time for fibre optic oxygen sensors manufactured from three different polymer matrices to a step change in PO2 from 3 kPa to 21 kPa.

Mentions: Fig. 3 shows the PO2 signal versus time responses for oxygen sensors constructed using the three different acrylate polymers. In each case, a PO2 step change from 3 kPa to 21 kPa was evoked in test chamber and the spectrophotometer integration time set to 50 ms in order to improve the S/N ratio.


Experimental investigation of the effect of polymer matrices on polymer fibre optic oxygen sensors and their time response characteristics using a vacuum testing chamber and a liquid flow apparatus.

Chen R, Formenti F, McPeak H, Obeid AN, Hahn C, Farmery A - Sens Actuators B Chem (2016)

Typical plots of PO2 versus time for fibre optic oxygen sensors manufactured from three different polymer matrices to a step change in PO2 from 3 kPa to 21 kPa.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643756&req=5

fig0015: Typical plots of PO2 versus time for fibre optic oxygen sensors manufactured from three different polymer matrices to a step change in PO2 from 3 kPa to 21 kPa.
Mentions: Fig. 3 shows the PO2 signal versus time responses for oxygen sensors constructed using the three different acrylate polymers. In each case, a PO2 step change from 3 kPa to 21 kPa was evoked in test chamber and the spectrophotometer integration time set to 50 ms in order to improve the S/N ratio.

Bottom Line: Previous attempts to design fast intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensors for use in physiology and medicine have failed to meet the criteria that are now required in modern investigations.In this article, we present an inexpensive polymer type fibre-optic, oxygen sensor that is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional electrochemical oxygen sensors.It is constructed with biologically inert polymer materials and is both sufficiently small and robust for direct insertion in to a human artery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nuffield Division of Anaesthetics, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.

ABSTRACT

Very fast sensors that are able to track rapid changes in oxygen partial pressure (PO2) in the gas and liquid phases are increasingly required in scientific research - particularly in the life sciences. Recent interest in monitoring very fast changes in the PO2 of arterial blood in some respiratory failure conditions is one such example. Previous attempts to design fast intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensors for use in physiology and medicine have failed to meet the criteria that are now required in modern investigations. However, miniature photonic devices are capable of meeting this need. In this article, we present an inexpensive polymer type fibre-optic, oxygen sensor that is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional electrochemical oxygen sensors. It is constructed with biologically inert polymer materials and is both sufficiently small and robust for direct insertion in to a human artery. The sensors were tested and evaluated in both a gas testing chamber and in a flowing liquid test system. The results showed a very fast T 90 response time, typically circa 20 ms when tested in the gas phase, and circa 100 ms in flowing liquid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus