Limits...
Brachytherapy for malignancies of the vagina in the 3D era.

Glaser SM, Beriwal S - J Contemp Brachytherapy (2015)

Bottom Line: Vaginal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and can be either recurrent or primary.In both cases, brachytherapy places a central role in the overall treatment course.The aim of this manuscript is to outline the incorporation of modern brachytherapy into the treatment of patients with vaginal cancer including patient selection along with the role of brachytherapy in conjunction with other treatment modalities, various brachytherapy techniques, treatment planning, dose fractionation schedules, and normal tissue tolerance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vaginal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and can be either recurrent or primary. In both cases, brachytherapy places a central role in the overall treatment course. Recent technological advances have led to more advanced brachytherapy techniques, which in turn have translated to improved outcomes for patients with malignancies of the vagina. The aim of this manuscript is to outline the incorporation of modern brachytherapy into the treatment of patients with vaginal cancer including patient selection along with the role of brachytherapy in conjunction with other treatment modalities, various brachytherapy techniques, treatment planning, dose fractionation schedules, and normal tissue tolerance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dosimetry of a single-channel vaginal cylinder with prescription dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of EBRT followed by 5 Gy x 5 fractions HDR brachytherapy with CTV D90 = 75.5 Gy, Rectum D2cc = 61.6 Gy, Bladder D2cc = 58.6 Gy
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643736&req=5

Figure 0002: Dosimetry of a single-channel vaginal cylinder with prescription dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of EBRT followed by 5 Gy x 5 fractions HDR brachytherapy with CTV D90 = 75.5 Gy, Rectum D2cc = 61.6 Gy, Bladder D2cc = 58.6 Gy

Mentions: Commercially available vaginal cylinders range in diameter from 2 cm to 4 cm. When a smaller cylinder is used, the ratio of prescription depth to cylinder radius is greater. Following the inverse square law, this creates higher surface doses for smaller cylinders. For example, if a 2.5 cm cylinder were used with a prescription depth of 5 mm, the dose to the vaginal surface (tissue-cylinder interface) would be 196% of the prescription dose, whereas if a 3.5 cm cylinder were used with the same prescription depth of 5 mm, the vaginal surface dose would be reduced to 165% of the prescription dose. As such, when performing intracavitary BT, the largest cylinder, which the patient can comfortably accommodate should be used. This also helps prevent air gaps between the tissue and the cylinder, which are dosimetrically disadvantageous. An example of a SCVCB plan can be found in Figure 2.


Brachytherapy for malignancies of the vagina in the 3D era.

Glaser SM, Beriwal S - J Contemp Brachytherapy (2015)

Dosimetry of a single-channel vaginal cylinder with prescription dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of EBRT followed by 5 Gy x 5 fractions HDR brachytherapy with CTV D90 = 75.5 Gy, Rectum D2cc = 61.6 Gy, Bladder D2cc = 58.6 Gy
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643736&req=5

Figure 0002: Dosimetry of a single-channel vaginal cylinder with prescription dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of EBRT followed by 5 Gy x 5 fractions HDR brachytherapy with CTV D90 = 75.5 Gy, Rectum D2cc = 61.6 Gy, Bladder D2cc = 58.6 Gy
Mentions: Commercially available vaginal cylinders range in diameter from 2 cm to 4 cm. When a smaller cylinder is used, the ratio of prescription depth to cylinder radius is greater. Following the inverse square law, this creates higher surface doses for smaller cylinders. For example, if a 2.5 cm cylinder were used with a prescription depth of 5 mm, the dose to the vaginal surface (tissue-cylinder interface) would be 196% of the prescription dose, whereas if a 3.5 cm cylinder were used with the same prescription depth of 5 mm, the vaginal surface dose would be reduced to 165% of the prescription dose. As such, when performing intracavitary BT, the largest cylinder, which the patient can comfortably accommodate should be used. This also helps prevent air gaps between the tissue and the cylinder, which are dosimetrically disadvantageous. An example of a SCVCB plan can be found in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Vaginal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and can be either recurrent or primary.In both cases, brachytherapy places a central role in the overall treatment course.The aim of this manuscript is to outline the incorporation of modern brachytherapy into the treatment of patients with vaginal cancer including patient selection along with the role of brachytherapy in conjunction with other treatment modalities, various brachytherapy techniques, treatment planning, dose fractionation schedules, and normal tissue tolerance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vaginal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and can be either recurrent or primary. In both cases, brachytherapy places a central role in the overall treatment course. Recent technological advances have led to more advanced brachytherapy techniques, which in turn have translated to improved outcomes for patients with malignancies of the vagina. The aim of this manuscript is to outline the incorporation of modern brachytherapy into the treatment of patients with vaginal cancer including patient selection along with the role of brachytherapy in conjunction with other treatment modalities, various brachytherapy techniques, treatment planning, dose fractionation schedules, and normal tissue tolerance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus