Limits...
Asymmetrical white matter networks for attending to global versus local features.

Chechlacz M, Mantini D, Gillebert CR, Humphreys GW - Cortex (2015)

Bottom Line: We found (i) that reproduction of local features in figure copying was supported by a neural network confined to the left hemisphere, consisting of cortical loci within parietal, occipital and insular lobes and interconnected by the inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and (ii) that global feature processing was associated with a right hemisphere network interconnected by the third branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and the long segment of the perisylvian network.The data support the argument that asymmetrical white matter disconnections within long-range association pathways predict poor complex figure drawing resulting from deficits in hierarchical representation.We conclude that hemispheric asymmetries in attending to local versus global features exist on the level of both cortical loci and the supporting white matter pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: magdalena.chechlacz@psy.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The asymmetrical brain networks for attending to (A) local and (B) global features. The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue) indicated by track-wise lesion analyses are presented in relation to cortical loci indentified by VBM (red). The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue; IFOF = inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, SLFIII = third branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus and long segment of perisylvian network) are presented as the thresholded (50%) maps from the DTI tractography atlas of human white matter tracts (Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011a, Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011b) and the cortical loci (red) are presented as binary statistical maps thresholded at the significance level of p < .001 cluster-level corrected for multiple comparison (see Table 2 for full details).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643681&req=5

fig3: The asymmetrical brain networks for attending to (A) local and (B) global features. The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue) indicated by track-wise lesion analyses are presented in relation to cortical loci indentified by VBM (red). The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue; IFOF = inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, SLFIII = third branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus and long segment of perisylvian network) are presented as the thresholded (50%) maps from the DTI tractography atlas of human white matter tracts (Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011a, Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011b) and the cortical loci (red) are presented as binary statistical maps thresholded at the significance level of p < .001 cluster-level corrected for multiple comparison (see Table 2 for full details).

Mentions: We adopted here a hodological approach to understanding the contribution of white matter disconnections to cognitive symptoms (Catani and Mesulam, 2008a, Catani and Mesulam, 2008b, Rudrauf et al., 2008, Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2008) based on linear regression performed to identify specific white matter pathways, which when damaged predict deficits in local versus global processing in complex figure copying. The linear regression analysis indicated that lateralized damage within the left and right hemispheres contributes specifically to local versus global processing deficits respectively. Damage within the left IFOF was a predictor of local processing deficits in the complex figure copy test (β = .210; p = .001; Fig. 3A), while damage within the right SLFIII (β = .213; p = .001; Fig. 3B) and the long segment of perisylvian network (long segment of arcuate fasciculus; β = .189; p = .003; Fig. 3B) were predictors of global processing deficits.


Asymmetrical white matter networks for attending to global versus local features.

Chechlacz M, Mantini D, Gillebert CR, Humphreys GW - Cortex (2015)

The asymmetrical brain networks for attending to (A) local and (B) global features. The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue) indicated by track-wise lesion analyses are presented in relation to cortical loci indentified by VBM (red). The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue; IFOF = inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, SLFIII = third branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus and long segment of perisylvian network) are presented as the thresholded (50%) maps from the DTI tractography atlas of human white matter tracts (Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011a, Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011b) and the cortical loci (red) are presented as binary statistical maps thresholded at the significance level of p < .001 cluster-level corrected for multiple comparison (see Table 2 for full details).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643681&req=5

fig3: The asymmetrical brain networks for attending to (A) local and (B) global features. The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue) indicated by track-wise lesion analyses are presented in relation to cortical loci indentified by VBM (red). The trajectories of white matter pathways (blue; IFOF = inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, SLFIII = third branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus and long segment of perisylvian network) are presented as the thresholded (50%) maps from the DTI tractography atlas of human white matter tracts (Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011a, Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2011b) and the cortical loci (red) are presented as binary statistical maps thresholded at the significance level of p < .001 cluster-level corrected for multiple comparison (see Table 2 for full details).
Mentions: We adopted here a hodological approach to understanding the contribution of white matter disconnections to cognitive symptoms (Catani and Mesulam, 2008a, Catani and Mesulam, 2008b, Rudrauf et al., 2008, Thiebaut de Schotten et al., 2008) based on linear regression performed to identify specific white matter pathways, which when damaged predict deficits in local versus global processing in complex figure copying. The linear regression analysis indicated that lateralized damage within the left and right hemispheres contributes specifically to local versus global processing deficits respectively. Damage within the left IFOF was a predictor of local processing deficits in the complex figure copy test (β = .210; p = .001; Fig. 3A), while damage within the right SLFIII (β = .213; p = .001; Fig. 3B) and the long segment of perisylvian network (long segment of arcuate fasciculus; β = .189; p = .003; Fig. 3B) were predictors of global processing deficits.

Bottom Line: We found (i) that reproduction of local features in figure copying was supported by a neural network confined to the left hemisphere, consisting of cortical loci within parietal, occipital and insular lobes and interconnected by the inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and (ii) that global feature processing was associated with a right hemisphere network interconnected by the third branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and the long segment of the perisylvian network.The data support the argument that asymmetrical white matter disconnections within long-range association pathways predict poor complex figure drawing resulting from deficits in hierarchical representation.We conclude that hemispheric asymmetries in attending to local versus global features exist on the level of both cortical loci and the supporting white matter pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: magdalena.chechlacz@psy.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus