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Specific loss of CatSper function is sufficient to compromise fertilizing capacity of human spermatozoa.

Williams HL, Mansell S, Alasmari W, Brown SG, Wilson SM, Sutton KA, Miller MR, Lishko PV, Barratt CL, Publicover SJ, Martins da Silva S - Hum. Reprod. (2015)

Bottom Line: A suboptimal Ca(2+) influx is significantly associated with, and more prevalent in, men with abnormal semen parameters, and is associated with reduced fertilizing capacity.As such it cannot be concluded that impaired CatSper function alone causes infertility or that CatSper blockade is a potential safe target for contraception.Not applicable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reproductive and Developmental Biology, Medical School, Ninewells Hospital, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK Assisted Conception Unit, NHS Tayside, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from spermatozoa from Donors and Patient 1. CatSper currents are absent from spermatozoa from Patient 1. Current–voltage relationship recorded under Cs-based divalent free conditions from spermatozoa from Patient 1 (n = 3). Capacitated donor data are also shown (n = 7). Current is measured in picoamps per picofarad, to normalize for variation in capacitance between cells. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM).
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DEV243F3: Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from spermatozoa from Donors and Patient 1. CatSper currents are absent from spermatozoa from Patient 1. Current–voltage relationship recorded under Cs-based divalent free conditions from spermatozoa from Patient 1 (n = 3). Capacitated donor data are also shown (n = 7). Current is measured in picoamps per picofarad, to normalize for variation in capacitance between cells. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM).

Mentions: CatSper has typically been characterized under monovalent conditions (Lishko et al., 2011; Smith et al., 2013); therefore Cs-based divalent free solutions were used to examine CatSper channel function. CatSper currents (ICatSper) were robust in sperm from donors with a maximum outward current of 204.6 ± 17.7 pA/pF (Fig. 3). In contrast, ICatSper was essentially absent in sperm from Patient 1 with the maximum current (4.0 ± 0.4 pA/pF) being significantly lower (P < 0.01).Figure 3


Specific loss of CatSper function is sufficient to compromise fertilizing capacity of human spermatozoa.

Williams HL, Mansell S, Alasmari W, Brown SG, Wilson SM, Sutton KA, Miller MR, Lishko PV, Barratt CL, Publicover SJ, Martins da Silva S - Hum. Reprod. (2015)

Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from spermatozoa from Donors and Patient 1. CatSper currents are absent from spermatozoa from Patient 1. Current–voltage relationship recorded under Cs-based divalent free conditions from spermatozoa from Patient 1 (n = 3). Capacitated donor data are also shown (n = 7). Current is measured in picoamps per picofarad, to normalize for variation in capacitance between cells. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643530&req=5

DEV243F3: Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from spermatozoa from Donors and Patient 1. CatSper currents are absent from spermatozoa from Patient 1. Current–voltage relationship recorded under Cs-based divalent free conditions from spermatozoa from Patient 1 (n = 3). Capacitated donor data are also shown (n = 7). Current is measured in picoamps per picofarad, to normalize for variation in capacitance between cells. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM).
Mentions: CatSper has typically been characterized under monovalent conditions (Lishko et al., 2011; Smith et al., 2013); therefore Cs-based divalent free solutions were used to examine CatSper channel function. CatSper currents (ICatSper) were robust in sperm from donors with a maximum outward current of 204.6 ± 17.7 pA/pF (Fig. 3). In contrast, ICatSper was essentially absent in sperm from Patient 1 with the maximum current (4.0 ± 0.4 pA/pF) being significantly lower (P < 0.01).Figure 3

Bottom Line: A suboptimal Ca(2+) influx is significantly associated with, and more prevalent in, men with abnormal semen parameters, and is associated with reduced fertilizing capacity.As such it cannot be concluded that impaired CatSper function alone causes infertility or that CatSper blockade is a potential safe target for contraception.Not applicable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reproductive and Developmental Biology, Medical School, Ninewells Hospital, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK Assisted Conception Unit, NHS Tayside, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus