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Monitoring of timely and delayed vaccinations: a nation-wide registry-based study of Norwegian children aged < 2 years.

Riise ØR, Laake I, Bergsaker MA, Nøkleby H, Haugen IL, Storsæter J - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Immigrant children were more frequently delayed 52.3 % vs. 43.1 %, RR 1.21 (95 % CI 1.19, 1.24).Children scheduled for vaccines in the summer holiday month (July) were more frequently delayed than others (1(st) dose pertussis vaccine 6.5 % vs. 3.9 % RR 1.65 (95 % CI 1.48, 1.85).Monitoring improves programme surveillance and may be used on an annual basis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Disease Control, Department of Vaccines, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, NO-0403, Oslo, Norway. oeri@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Delayed vaccinations increase the risk for vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Monitoring of delayed vaccinations by using a national immunisation registry has not been studied in countries recommending a two-dose (3 and 5 months of age) primary series of e.g., pertussis vaccine. Surveillance/monitoring of all vaccinations may improve vaccination programmes functioning.

Methods: We obtained information from the Norwegian immunisation registry (SYSVAK) on all programme vaccinations received at age up to 730 days in children born in 2010 (n = 63,382). Timely vaccinations were received up to 7 days after the recommended age. Vaccinations were considered delayed if they were received more than one month after the recommended age in the schedule.

Results: In vaccinated children, timely administration of the subsequent three doses of pertussis and one dose of measles occurred in 73.8, 47.6, 53.6 and 43.5 % respectively. Delay for one or more programme vaccinations (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Haemophilus influenza type B, invasive pneumococcal disease, measles, mumps or rubella) was present in 28,336 (44.7 %) children. Among those who were delayed the mean duration was 139 days. The proportion of children that had vaccinations delayed differed among counties (range 37.4 %-57.8 %). Immigrant children were more frequently delayed 52.3 % vs. 43.1 %, RR 1.21 (95 % CI 1.19, 1.24). Children scheduled for vaccines in the summer holiday month (July) were more frequently delayed than others (1(st) dose pertussis vaccine 6.5 % vs. 3.9 % RR 1.65 (95 % CI 1.48, 1.85). Priming against pertussis (2(nd) dose), pneumococcal (2(nd) dose) and measles (1(st) dose) was delayed in 16.8, 18.6 and 29.3 % respectively.

Conclusion: Vaccinations were frequently delayed. Delayed vaccinations differed among counties and occurred more frequently during the summer vacation (July) and in the immigrant population. Monitoring improves programme surveillance and may be used on an annual basis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vaccination coverage and delayed vaccinations by county in children aged < 2 years, born 2010, Norway, (n=61846). Legend: Complete series: Three doses: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type B (only 1 dose if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), pneumococcal (only 2 doses if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), 1 dose: measles, mumps, rubella vaccines. Vaccination coverage, proportion vaccinated at age 2 years. Delay: vaccination administered ≥ 1 month after due date
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Fig2: Vaccination coverage and delayed vaccinations by county in children aged < 2 years, born 2010, Norway, (n=61846). Legend: Complete series: Three doses: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type B (only 1 dose if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), pneumococcal (only 2 doses if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), 1 dose: measles, mumps, rubella vaccines. Vaccination coverage, proportion vaccinated at age 2 years. Delay: vaccination administered ≥ 1 month after due date

Mentions: The proportion with delay did not differ by gender (boys 43.7 % vs. girls 43.0 % for the complete series). On county level, 37.4–57.8 % of children were delayed for ≥ 1 programme vaccination (median delay, range 23–42 days; Fig. 2). The two counties (Troms and Vestfold) with the highest proportion delayed vaccinations had vaccination coverage at 2 years ≥ 89 % for the complete series. When we compare the counties with highest (Vestfold) and lowest (Oppland) proportion of delayed vaccinations the immigrant population was 15.8 % vs 9.7 %, the proportion living in urban settlements was 85.3 % vs. 57.1 % and the proportion of adult higher education was 25.5 % vs. 21.5 % respectively [14].Fig. 2


Monitoring of timely and delayed vaccinations: a nation-wide registry-based study of Norwegian children aged < 2 years.

Riise ØR, Laake I, Bergsaker MA, Nøkleby H, Haugen IL, Storsæter J - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Vaccination coverage and delayed vaccinations by county in children aged < 2 years, born 2010, Norway, (n=61846). Legend: Complete series: Three doses: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type B (only 1 dose if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), pneumococcal (only 2 doses if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), 1 dose: measles, mumps, rubella vaccines. Vaccination coverage, proportion vaccinated at age 2 years. Delay: vaccination administered ≥ 1 month after due date
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643514&req=5

Fig2: Vaccination coverage and delayed vaccinations by county in children aged < 2 years, born 2010, Norway, (n=61846). Legend: Complete series: Three doses: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type B (only 1 dose if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), pneumococcal (only 2 doses if 1st dose given at age ≥ 365 days), 1 dose: measles, mumps, rubella vaccines. Vaccination coverage, proportion vaccinated at age 2 years. Delay: vaccination administered ≥ 1 month after due date
Mentions: The proportion with delay did not differ by gender (boys 43.7 % vs. girls 43.0 % for the complete series). On county level, 37.4–57.8 % of children were delayed for ≥ 1 programme vaccination (median delay, range 23–42 days; Fig. 2). The two counties (Troms and Vestfold) with the highest proportion delayed vaccinations had vaccination coverage at 2 years ≥ 89 % for the complete series. When we compare the counties with highest (Vestfold) and lowest (Oppland) proportion of delayed vaccinations the immigrant population was 15.8 % vs 9.7 %, the proportion living in urban settlements was 85.3 % vs. 57.1 % and the proportion of adult higher education was 25.5 % vs. 21.5 % respectively [14].Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Immigrant children were more frequently delayed 52.3 % vs. 43.1 %, RR 1.21 (95 % CI 1.19, 1.24).Children scheduled for vaccines in the summer holiday month (July) were more frequently delayed than others (1(st) dose pertussis vaccine 6.5 % vs. 3.9 % RR 1.65 (95 % CI 1.48, 1.85).Monitoring improves programme surveillance and may be used on an annual basis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Disease Control, Department of Vaccines, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, NO-0403, Oslo, Norway. oeri@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Delayed vaccinations increase the risk for vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Monitoring of delayed vaccinations by using a national immunisation registry has not been studied in countries recommending a two-dose (3 and 5 months of age) primary series of e.g., pertussis vaccine. Surveillance/monitoring of all vaccinations may improve vaccination programmes functioning.

Methods: We obtained information from the Norwegian immunisation registry (SYSVAK) on all programme vaccinations received at age up to 730 days in children born in 2010 (n = 63,382). Timely vaccinations were received up to 7 days after the recommended age. Vaccinations were considered delayed if they were received more than one month after the recommended age in the schedule.

Results: In vaccinated children, timely administration of the subsequent three doses of pertussis and one dose of measles occurred in 73.8, 47.6, 53.6 and 43.5 % respectively. Delay for one or more programme vaccinations (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Haemophilus influenza type B, invasive pneumococcal disease, measles, mumps or rubella) was present in 28,336 (44.7 %) children. Among those who were delayed the mean duration was 139 days. The proportion of children that had vaccinations delayed differed among counties (range 37.4 %-57.8 %). Immigrant children were more frequently delayed 52.3 % vs. 43.1 %, RR 1.21 (95 % CI 1.19, 1.24). Children scheduled for vaccines in the summer holiday month (July) were more frequently delayed than others (1(st) dose pertussis vaccine 6.5 % vs. 3.9 % RR 1.65 (95 % CI 1.48, 1.85). Priming against pertussis (2(nd) dose), pneumococcal (2(nd) dose) and measles (1(st) dose) was delayed in 16.8, 18.6 and 29.3 % respectively.

Conclusion: Vaccinations were frequently delayed. Delayed vaccinations differed among counties and occurred more frequently during the summer vacation (July) and in the immigrant population. Monitoring improves programme surveillance and may be used on an annual basis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus