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Local Heterozygosity Effects on Nestling Growth and Condition in the Great Cormorant.

Minias P, Wojczulanis-Jakubas K, Rutkowski R, Kaczmarek K - Evol Biol (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that heterozygosity was positively associated with both nestling traits at the between-brood level, but the individual (within-brood) effects of heterozygosity were non-significant.We also found that only one locus per trait was primarily responsible for the significant multi-locus HFCs, suggesting a linkage disequilibrium with non-identified functional loci.The results give support for 'local effect' hypothesis, confirming that HFCs may not only be interpreted as evidence of inbreeding and that genetic associations between functional and selectively neutral markers could be much more common in natural populations than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Teacher Training and Biodiversity Studies, University of Łódź, Banacha 1/3, 90-237 Łódź, Poland ; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA.

ABSTRACT

Under inbreeding, heterozygosity at neutral genetic markers is likely to reflect genome-wide heterozygosity and, thus, is expected to correlate with fitness. There is, however, growing evidence that some of heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) can be explained by 'local effects', where noncoding loci are at linkage disequilibrium with functional genes. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between heterozygosity at seven microsatellite loci and two fitness-related traits, nestling growth rate and nutritional condition, in a recently bottlenecked population of great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis. We found that heterozygosity was positively associated with both nestling traits at the between-brood level, but the individual (within-brood) effects of heterozygosity were non-significant. We also found that only one locus per trait was primarily responsible for the significant multi-locus HFCs, suggesting a linkage disequilibrium with non-identified functional loci. The results give support for 'local effect' hypothesis, confirming that HFCs may not only be interpreted as evidence of inbreeding and that genetic associations between functional and selectively neutral markers could be much more common in natural populations than previously thought.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Between-nest effects (mean values for each nest) of multi-locus heterozygosity on growth rate (a) and nutritional condition (b) of great cormorant nestlings. The lines indicate fitted regressions
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Fig1: Between-nest effects (mean values for each nest) of multi-locus heterozygosity on growth rate (a) and nutritional condition (b) of great cormorant nestlings. The lines indicate fitted regressions

Mentions: After accounting for the effects of sex, hatching rank, and year, we found a significant positive relationship between multi-locus heterozygosity and nestling growth rate at the between-nest level (Fig. 1a), while there was no significant within-nest relationship between these traits (Table 2). A similar pattern was found for nutritional condition of nestlings, with multi-locus heterozygosity showing a significant between-nest effect (Fig. 1b) and no significant within-nest effect of heterozygosity on condition (Table 3).Fig. 1


Local Heterozygosity Effects on Nestling Growth and Condition in the Great Cormorant.

Minias P, Wojczulanis-Jakubas K, Rutkowski R, Kaczmarek K - Evol Biol (2015)

Between-nest effects (mean values for each nest) of multi-locus heterozygosity on growth rate (a) and nutritional condition (b) of great cormorant nestlings. The lines indicate fitted regressions
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4642584&req=5

Fig1: Between-nest effects (mean values for each nest) of multi-locus heterozygosity on growth rate (a) and nutritional condition (b) of great cormorant nestlings. The lines indicate fitted regressions
Mentions: After accounting for the effects of sex, hatching rank, and year, we found a significant positive relationship between multi-locus heterozygosity and nestling growth rate at the between-nest level (Fig. 1a), while there was no significant within-nest relationship between these traits (Table 2). A similar pattern was found for nutritional condition of nestlings, with multi-locus heterozygosity showing a significant between-nest effect (Fig. 1b) and no significant within-nest effect of heterozygosity on condition (Table 3).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We found that heterozygosity was positively associated with both nestling traits at the between-brood level, but the individual (within-brood) effects of heterozygosity were non-significant.We also found that only one locus per trait was primarily responsible for the significant multi-locus HFCs, suggesting a linkage disequilibrium with non-identified functional loci.The results give support for 'local effect' hypothesis, confirming that HFCs may not only be interpreted as evidence of inbreeding and that genetic associations between functional and selectively neutral markers could be much more common in natural populations than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Teacher Training and Biodiversity Studies, University of Łódź, Banacha 1/3, 90-237 Łódź, Poland ; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA.

ABSTRACT

Under inbreeding, heterozygosity at neutral genetic markers is likely to reflect genome-wide heterozygosity and, thus, is expected to correlate with fitness. There is, however, growing evidence that some of heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) can be explained by 'local effects', where noncoding loci are at linkage disequilibrium with functional genes. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between heterozygosity at seven microsatellite loci and two fitness-related traits, nestling growth rate and nutritional condition, in a recently bottlenecked population of great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis. We found that heterozygosity was positively associated with both nestling traits at the between-brood level, but the individual (within-brood) effects of heterozygosity were non-significant. We also found that only one locus per trait was primarily responsible for the significant multi-locus HFCs, suggesting a linkage disequilibrium with non-identified functional loci. The results give support for 'local effect' hypothesis, confirming that HFCs may not only be interpreted as evidence of inbreeding and that genetic associations between functional and selectively neutral markers could be much more common in natural populations than previously thought.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus