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Organization of lipids in milks, infant milk formulas and various dairy products: role of technological processes and potential impacts.

Lopez C, Cauty C, Guyomarc'h F - Dairy Sci Technol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, for the last 10 years, several research groups including our laboratory have significantly contributed to increasing knowledge on the organization of lipids in situ in dairy products.The main mechanical treatment used in the dairy industry, homogenization, decreases the size of milk fat globules, changes the architecture (composition and organization) of the fat/water interface and affects the interactions between lipid droplets and the protein network (concept of inert vs active fillers).The potential impacts of the organization of lipids and of the alteration of the milk fat globule membrane are discussed, and technological strategies are proposed, in priority to design biomimetic lipid droplets in infant milk formulas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR1253 STLO, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, 35000 Rennes, France ; Agrocampus Ouest, UMR1253 STLO, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, 35000 Rennes, France.

ABSTRACT

The microstructure of milk fat in processed dairy products is poorly known despite its importance in their functional, sensorial and nutritional properties. However, for the last 10 years, several research groups including our laboratory have significantly contributed to increasing knowledge on the organization of lipids in situ in dairy products. This paper provides an overview of recent advances on the organization of lipids in the milk fat globule membrane using microscopy techniques (mainly confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy). Also, this overview brings structural information about the organization of lipids in situ in commercialized milks, infant milk formulas and various dairy products (cream, butter, buttermilk, butter serum and cheeses). The main mechanical treatment used in the dairy industry, homogenization, decreases the size of milk fat globules, changes the architecture (composition and organization) of the fat/water interface and affects the interactions between lipid droplets and the protein network (concept of inert vs active fillers). The potential impacts of the organization of lipids and of the alteration of the milk fat globule membrane are discussed, and technological strategies are proposed, in priority to design biomimetic lipid droplets in infant milk formulas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microstructure of milk fat components. a, left: Milk fat globules surrounded by their biological membrane, the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM): a trilayer of polar lipids and proteins. a, right: Structures derived from the MFGM: fragments of MFGM and vesicles of milk polar lipids characterized in buttermilks and butter serum, respectively. b Schematic representation of the organization of milk fat in a casein matrix, as observed in various dairy products such as acidified dairy creams, yoghurt and cheeses
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Fig9: Microstructure of milk fat components. a, left: Milk fat globules surrounded by their biological membrane, the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM): a trilayer of polar lipids and proteins. a, right: Structures derived from the MFGM: fragments of MFGM and vesicles of milk polar lipids characterized in buttermilks and butter serum, respectively. b Schematic representation of the organization of milk fat in a casein matrix, as observed in various dairy products such as acidified dairy creams, yoghurt and cheeses

Mentions: As a conclusion, various organizations of lipids can be present within the cheese matrix, depending mainly on the mechanical treatments (homogenization and/or draining operations) applied during the manufacture of cheeses (Fig. 9). Fat can be dispersed as (i) fat globules of 4 μm in diameter covered by their biological membrane (e.g. high-moisture Mozzarella cheese, mould-ripened soft cheeses, i.e. no homogenization, moderate drainage), (ii) inclusions of non-globular free fat of several μm (e.g. Cheddar cheese, Emmental cheese, low-moisture Mozzarella cheese, i.e. no homogenization and intense drainage), (iii) very small homogenized lipid droplets covered by milk proteins (e.g. fresh cheeses, cream cheese, blue cheeses).Fig. 9


Organization of lipids in milks, infant milk formulas and various dairy products: role of technological processes and potential impacts.

Lopez C, Cauty C, Guyomarc'h F - Dairy Sci Technol (2015)

Microstructure of milk fat components. a, left: Milk fat globules surrounded by their biological membrane, the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM): a trilayer of polar lipids and proteins. a, right: Structures derived from the MFGM: fragments of MFGM and vesicles of milk polar lipids characterized in buttermilks and butter serum, respectively. b Schematic representation of the organization of milk fat in a casein matrix, as observed in various dairy products such as acidified dairy creams, yoghurt and cheeses
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4641158&req=5

Fig9: Microstructure of milk fat components. a, left: Milk fat globules surrounded by their biological membrane, the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM): a trilayer of polar lipids and proteins. a, right: Structures derived from the MFGM: fragments of MFGM and vesicles of milk polar lipids characterized in buttermilks and butter serum, respectively. b Schematic representation of the organization of milk fat in a casein matrix, as observed in various dairy products such as acidified dairy creams, yoghurt and cheeses
Mentions: As a conclusion, various organizations of lipids can be present within the cheese matrix, depending mainly on the mechanical treatments (homogenization and/or draining operations) applied during the manufacture of cheeses (Fig. 9). Fat can be dispersed as (i) fat globules of 4 μm in diameter covered by their biological membrane (e.g. high-moisture Mozzarella cheese, mould-ripened soft cheeses, i.e. no homogenization, moderate drainage), (ii) inclusions of non-globular free fat of several μm (e.g. Cheddar cheese, Emmental cheese, low-moisture Mozzarella cheese, i.e. no homogenization and intense drainage), (iii) very small homogenized lipid droplets covered by milk proteins (e.g. fresh cheeses, cream cheese, blue cheeses).Fig. 9

Bottom Line: However, for the last 10 years, several research groups including our laboratory have significantly contributed to increasing knowledge on the organization of lipids in situ in dairy products.The main mechanical treatment used in the dairy industry, homogenization, decreases the size of milk fat globules, changes the architecture (composition and organization) of the fat/water interface and affects the interactions between lipid droplets and the protein network (concept of inert vs active fillers).The potential impacts of the organization of lipids and of the alteration of the milk fat globule membrane are discussed, and technological strategies are proposed, in priority to design biomimetic lipid droplets in infant milk formulas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR1253 STLO, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, 35000 Rennes, France ; Agrocampus Ouest, UMR1253 STLO, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, 35000 Rennes, France.

ABSTRACT

The microstructure of milk fat in processed dairy products is poorly known despite its importance in their functional, sensorial and nutritional properties. However, for the last 10 years, several research groups including our laboratory have significantly contributed to increasing knowledge on the organization of lipids in situ in dairy products. This paper provides an overview of recent advances on the organization of lipids in the milk fat globule membrane using microscopy techniques (mainly confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy). Also, this overview brings structural information about the organization of lipids in situ in commercialized milks, infant milk formulas and various dairy products (cream, butter, buttermilk, butter serum and cheeses). The main mechanical treatment used in the dairy industry, homogenization, decreases the size of milk fat globules, changes the architecture (composition and organization) of the fat/water interface and affects the interactions between lipid droplets and the protein network (concept of inert vs active fillers). The potential impacts of the organization of lipids and of the alteration of the milk fat globule membrane are discussed, and technological strategies are proposed, in priority to design biomimetic lipid droplets in infant milk formulas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus