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Copper and cadmium in bottom sediments dredged from Wyścigi Pond, Warsaw, Poland-contamination and bioaccumulation study.

Wojtkowska M, Karwowska E, Chmielewska I, Bekenova K, Wanot E - Environ Monit Assess (2015)

Bottom Line: One of the results of the heavy metal presence in soils is their bioaccumulation in plants.The intensive development of both primary and lateral roots was noticed.During this early growth, metal accumulation in plants occurred.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Nowowiejska 20, 00-653, Warsaw, Poland. malgorzata.wojtkowska@is.pw.edu.pl.

ABSTRACT
This research covered an evaluation of the copper and cadmium concentrations in bottom sediments dredged from one of the ponds in Warsaw. The samples of sediments, soil, and plants were analyzed in terms of Cu and Cd content. The research concerned the heap of dredged bottom sediments from Wyścigi Pond, Warsaw, Poland. Two boreholes were made to obtain sediment cores with depths of A 162.5 cm and B 190.0 cm. The cores were divided into 10 sub-samples with a thickness of about 15-20 cm. A control sample of soil was taken from the horse racecourse several hundred meters away from the heap. The vegetation was sampled directly from the heap. The predominating plants were tested: Urtica dioica, Glechoma hederacea, Euonymus verrucosus, and Drepanocladus aduncus. A control sample of U. dioica taken outside of the heap was also tested. The commercial PHYTOTOXKIT microbiotest was applied to evaluate the influence of heavy metal-contaminated sediments (used as soil) on germination and growth of the chosen test plants. The analyses of cadmium and copper concentrations revealed that the metal concentration in sediments was diverse at different depths of sampling, probably reflecting their concentration in stored layers of sediments. Moreover, the metal content in core A was four to five times lower than that in core B, which reveals heterogeneity of the sediments in the tested heap. In core A, the copper concentration ranged from 4.7 to 13.4 mg/kg d.w. (average 8.06 ± 0.71 mg/kg d.w.), while in core B, it ranged from 9.2 to 82.1 mg/kg d.w. (average 38.56 ± 2.6 mg/kg d.w.). One of the results of the heavy metal presence in soils is their bioaccumulation in plants. Comparing plant growth, more intensive growth of roots was observed in the case of plants growing on the control (reference) soil than those growing on sediments. The intensive development of both primary and lateral roots was noticed. During this early growth, metal accumulation in plants occurred.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cd concentration in Sinapsis alba after 3 days and 4 weeks of growth on metal-loaded bottom sediments
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig15: Cd concentration in Sinapsis alba after 3 days and 4 weeks of growth on metal-loaded bottom sediments

Mentions: After the PHYTOTOXKIT test, the lowest concentrations of metals were noticed for Sinapsis alba. Because of this, the plant was then cultivated on sediments from the heap and reference soil, for 4 weeks in laboratory conditions. Then, the concentrations of Cu and Cd were determined and compared with those obtained after 3 days (Figs. 14 and 15). The significant increase in metal content in Sinapsis alba plants was observed after prolonged growth on contaminated ground, especially in the case of copper.Fig. 14


Copper and cadmium in bottom sediments dredged from Wyścigi Pond, Warsaw, Poland-contamination and bioaccumulation study.

Wojtkowska M, Karwowska E, Chmielewska I, Bekenova K, Wanot E - Environ Monit Assess (2015)

Cd concentration in Sinapsis alba after 3 days and 4 weeks of growth on metal-loaded bottom sediments
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4641152&req=5

Fig15: Cd concentration in Sinapsis alba after 3 days and 4 weeks of growth on metal-loaded bottom sediments
Mentions: After the PHYTOTOXKIT test, the lowest concentrations of metals were noticed for Sinapsis alba. Because of this, the plant was then cultivated on sediments from the heap and reference soil, for 4 weeks in laboratory conditions. Then, the concentrations of Cu and Cd were determined and compared with those obtained after 3 days (Figs. 14 and 15). The significant increase in metal content in Sinapsis alba plants was observed after prolonged growth on contaminated ground, especially in the case of copper.Fig. 14

Bottom Line: One of the results of the heavy metal presence in soils is their bioaccumulation in plants.The intensive development of both primary and lateral roots was noticed.During this early growth, metal accumulation in plants occurred.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Nowowiejska 20, 00-653, Warsaw, Poland. malgorzata.wojtkowska@is.pw.edu.pl.

ABSTRACT
This research covered an evaluation of the copper and cadmium concentrations in bottom sediments dredged from one of the ponds in Warsaw. The samples of sediments, soil, and plants were analyzed in terms of Cu and Cd content. The research concerned the heap of dredged bottom sediments from Wyścigi Pond, Warsaw, Poland. Two boreholes were made to obtain sediment cores with depths of A 162.5 cm and B 190.0 cm. The cores were divided into 10 sub-samples with a thickness of about 15-20 cm. A control sample of soil was taken from the horse racecourse several hundred meters away from the heap. The vegetation was sampled directly from the heap. The predominating plants were tested: Urtica dioica, Glechoma hederacea, Euonymus verrucosus, and Drepanocladus aduncus. A control sample of U. dioica taken outside of the heap was also tested. The commercial PHYTOTOXKIT microbiotest was applied to evaluate the influence of heavy metal-contaminated sediments (used as soil) on germination and growth of the chosen test plants. The analyses of cadmium and copper concentrations revealed that the metal concentration in sediments was diverse at different depths of sampling, probably reflecting their concentration in stored layers of sediments. Moreover, the metal content in core A was four to five times lower than that in core B, which reveals heterogeneity of the sediments in the tested heap. In core A, the copper concentration ranged from 4.7 to 13.4 mg/kg d.w. (average 8.06 ± 0.71 mg/kg d.w.), while in core B, it ranged from 9.2 to 82.1 mg/kg d.w. (average 38.56 ± 2.6 mg/kg d.w.). One of the results of the heavy metal presence in soils is their bioaccumulation in plants. Comparing plant growth, more intensive growth of roots was observed in the case of plants growing on the control (reference) soil than those growing on sediments. The intensive development of both primary and lateral roots was noticed. During this early growth, metal accumulation in plants occurred.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus