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Changes in Survival Rate for Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants in Korea: Comparison with Other Countries.

Shim JW, Jin HS, Bae CW - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The recent survival rate of VLBWI increased more than twice from 35.6% in the 1960s to 84.8%, and the survival rate of the extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI) increased by more than 10 times, indicating improvement of the survival rate in premature infants with lower birth weight and gestational age.Comparison of VLBWI between countries showed improved survival rates according to each birth weight group in Canada, Australia-New Zealand, and European countries with Japan at the head, but in terms of comparison based on gestational age, differences, except for Japan, have been reduced.Efforts to increase the survival rate of premature infants in Korea with low birth rate are inevitable, and they should be the foundation of academic and clinical development based on its network with advanced countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recently the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) was established in order to enhance treatment outcomes further through the registration of very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) data. The present study was conducted on 2,606 VLBWI, 2,386 registered and 220 un-registered, in the KNN participating centers, with the objective of reporting on recent survival rates of VLBWI in Korea and verifying the changing trends in survival rates with data from the 1960s and beyond. The study also aimed to compare the premature infants' survival rate in Korea with those reported in neonatal networks of other countries. The recent survival rate of VLBWI increased more than twice from 35.6% in the 1960s to 84.8%, and the survival rate of the extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI) increased by more than 10 times, indicating improvement of the survival rate in premature infants with lower birth weight and gestational age. Comparison of VLBWI between countries showed improved survival rates according to each birth weight group in Canada, Australia-New Zealand, and European countries with Japan at the head, but in terms of comparison based on gestational age, differences, except for Japan, have been reduced. Efforts to increase the survival rate of premature infants in Korea with low birth rate are inevitable, and they should be the foundation of academic and clinical development based on its network with advanced countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of neonatal survival rate in Korea, Japan, Europe, Canada, and Autralia-New Zealand by very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) and extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI). *P < 0.05 comparison to the KNN reference birth weight specific survival rates. KNN, Korean Neonatal Network; NRNJ, Neonatal Research Network of Japan (reference 20); NICHD, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network (U.S., reference 11); CNN, Canadian Neonatal Network (reference 21); AZN, Australia-New Zealand Neonatal Network (reference 22); EuroNeoNet, European Neonatal Network (reference 23); ELBWI, extremely low birth weight infants; VLWBI, very-low-birth-weight infants.
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Figure 4: Comparison of neonatal survival rate in Korea, Japan, Europe, Canada, and Autralia-New Zealand by very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) and extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI). *P < 0.05 comparison to the KNN reference birth weight specific survival rates. KNN, Korean Neonatal Network; NRNJ, Neonatal Research Network of Japan (reference 20); NICHD, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network (U.S., reference 11); CNN, Canadian Neonatal Network (reference 21); AZN, Australia-New Zealand Neonatal Network (reference 22); EuroNeoNet, European Neonatal Network (reference 23); ELBWI, extremely low birth weight infants; VLWBI, very-low-birth-weight infants.

Mentions: When the difference of survival rates in each country was compared according to birth weight, total survival rates of VLBWI were 93.8% (4,892/5,214), 90.2% (2,593/2,872), 92.2% (2,749/2,981) and 89.4% (4,562/5,103) in Japan, Canada, Australia-New Zealand, and European countries, respectively, which were higher than 84.8% of Korea. Their survival rates of ELBWI were also higher than that of Korea (Japan 89.4%, Canada 79.6%, Australia-New Zealand 83.3%, and European countries 78.2% vs. Korea 69.6%, Fig. 4). When the survival rates were compared according to each section of birth weight, survival rates of 500-1,000 g in Australia-New Zealand and Europe were higher than that of Korea, but there was no difference in the survival rate for groups below 500 g and over 1,000 g. Survival rates in all sections of birth weight lower than 1,200 g in Japan and lower than 1,250 g in Canada were higher than that of Korea, and especially in Japan, survival rates in all sections with birth weight below 1,000 g were markedly higher than that of Korea (Table 3). However, when survival rates of these countries and Korea were compared according to gestational age, it showed a different trend from the differences in the survival rate according to birth weight. In all countries except for Japan, differences in the survival rate with that of Korea decreased. Survival rates for 23 weeks and less, which is considered as a week for limited survival in most countries, showed no difference between Korea and all countries except for Japan. Most countries including Korea showed 60%-70% survival rate for 24-25 weeks while Japan showed a more than 80% survival rate. The survival rate of Japan showed a tendency to be maintained higher than the survival rates of other countries according to gestational age up to 28 weeks (Table 4).


Changes in Survival Rate for Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants in Korea: Comparison with Other Countries.

Shim JW, Jin HS, Bae CW - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Comparison of neonatal survival rate in Korea, Japan, Europe, Canada, and Autralia-New Zealand by very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) and extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI). *P < 0.05 comparison to the KNN reference birth weight specific survival rates. KNN, Korean Neonatal Network; NRNJ, Neonatal Research Network of Japan (reference 20); NICHD, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network (U.S., reference 11); CNN, Canadian Neonatal Network (reference 21); AZN, Australia-New Zealand Neonatal Network (reference 22); EuroNeoNet, European Neonatal Network (reference 23); ELBWI, extremely low birth weight infants; VLWBI, very-low-birth-weight infants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4641060&req=5

Figure 4: Comparison of neonatal survival rate in Korea, Japan, Europe, Canada, and Autralia-New Zealand by very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) and extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI). *P < 0.05 comparison to the KNN reference birth weight specific survival rates. KNN, Korean Neonatal Network; NRNJ, Neonatal Research Network of Japan (reference 20); NICHD, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network (U.S., reference 11); CNN, Canadian Neonatal Network (reference 21); AZN, Australia-New Zealand Neonatal Network (reference 22); EuroNeoNet, European Neonatal Network (reference 23); ELBWI, extremely low birth weight infants; VLWBI, very-low-birth-weight infants.
Mentions: When the difference of survival rates in each country was compared according to birth weight, total survival rates of VLBWI were 93.8% (4,892/5,214), 90.2% (2,593/2,872), 92.2% (2,749/2,981) and 89.4% (4,562/5,103) in Japan, Canada, Australia-New Zealand, and European countries, respectively, which were higher than 84.8% of Korea. Their survival rates of ELBWI were also higher than that of Korea (Japan 89.4%, Canada 79.6%, Australia-New Zealand 83.3%, and European countries 78.2% vs. Korea 69.6%, Fig. 4). When the survival rates were compared according to each section of birth weight, survival rates of 500-1,000 g in Australia-New Zealand and Europe were higher than that of Korea, but there was no difference in the survival rate for groups below 500 g and over 1,000 g. Survival rates in all sections of birth weight lower than 1,200 g in Japan and lower than 1,250 g in Canada were higher than that of Korea, and especially in Japan, survival rates in all sections with birth weight below 1,000 g were markedly higher than that of Korea (Table 3). However, when survival rates of these countries and Korea were compared according to gestational age, it showed a different trend from the differences in the survival rate according to birth weight. In all countries except for Japan, differences in the survival rate with that of Korea decreased. Survival rates for 23 weeks and less, which is considered as a week for limited survival in most countries, showed no difference between Korea and all countries except for Japan. Most countries including Korea showed 60%-70% survival rate for 24-25 weeks while Japan showed a more than 80% survival rate. The survival rate of Japan showed a tendency to be maintained higher than the survival rates of other countries according to gestational age up to 28 weeks (Table 4).

Bottom Line: The recent survival rate of VLBWI increased more than twice from 35.6% in the 1960s to 84.8%, and the survival rate of the extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI) increased by more than 10 times, indicating improvement of the survival rate in premature infants with lower birth weight and gestational age.Comparison of VLBWI between countries showed improved survival rates according to each birth weight group in Canada, Australia-New Zealand, and European countries with Japan at the head, but in terms of comparison based on gestational age, differences, except for Japan, have been reduced.Efforts to increase the survival rate of premature infants in Korea with low birth rate are inevitable, and they should be the foundation of academic and clinical development based on its network with advanced countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recently the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) was established in order to enhance treatment outcomes further through the registration of very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) data. The present study was conducted on 2,606 VLBWI, 2,386 registered and 220 un-registered, in the KNN participating centers, with the objective of reporting on recent survival rates of VLBWI in Korea and verifying the changing trends in survival rates with data from the 1960s and beyond. The study also aimed to compare the premature infants' survival rate in Korea with those reported in neonatal networks of other countries. The recent survival rate of VLBWI increased more than twice from 35.6% in the 1960s to 84.8%, and the survival rate of the extremely low birth weight infants (ELBWI) increased by more than 10 times, indicating improvement of the survival rate in premature infants with lower birth weight and gestational age. Comparison of VLBWI between countries showed improved survival rates according to each birth weight group in Canada, Australia-New Zealand, and European countries with Japan at the head, but in terms of comparison based on gestational age, differences, except for Japan, have been reduced. Efforts to increase the survival rate of premature infants in Korea with low birth rate are inevitable, and they should be the foundation of academic and clinical development based on its network with advanced countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus