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Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

Winskill P, Carvalho DO, Capurro ML, Alphey L, Donnelly CA, McKemey AR - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies.We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8m (95% CI: 49.9m, 56.8m) and Malaysia: 58.0m (95% CI: 51.1m, 71.0m).The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed.

Methodology/principal findings: The dispersal ability of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8m (95% CI: 49.9m, 56.8m) and Malaysia: 58.0m (95% CI: 51.1m, 71.0m).

Conclusions/significance: Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dispersal kernel comparison.A comparison of the A) distance pdf and B) density with respect to distance for estimates using MRR data from Brazil (solid blue line) and Malaysia (dashed pink line). The comparison highlights the similarity in estimated kernels for experiments conducted on different continents, in different habitats.
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pntd.0004156.g006: Dispersal kernel comparison.A comparison of the A) distance pdf and B) density with respect to distance for estimates using MRR data from Brazil (solid blue line) and Malaysia (dashed pink line). The comparison highlights the similarity in estimated kernels for experiments conducted on different continents, in different habitats.

Mentions: For a direct comparison the distance pdf and density with respect to distance for the optimal kernels estimated from the Itaberaba and Malaysia MRR experiments have been overlaid (Fig 6).


Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

Winskill P, Carvalho DO, Capurro ML, Alphey L, Donnelly CA, McKemey AR - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Dispersal kernel comparison.A comparison of the A) distance pdf and B) density with respect to distance for estimates using MRR data from Brazil (solid blue line) and Malaysia (dashed pink line). The comparison highlights the similarity in estimated kernels for experiments conducted on different continents, in different habitats.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4640874&req=5

pntd.0004156.g006: Dispersal kernel comparison.A comparison of the A) distance pdf and B) density with respect to distance for estimates using MRR data from Brazil (solid blue line) and Malaysia (dashed pink line). The comparison highlights the similarity in estimated kernels for experiments conducted on different continents, in different habitats.
Mentions: For a direct comparison the distance pdf and density with respect to distance for the optimal kernels estimated from the Itaberaba and Malaysia MRR experiments have been overlaid (Fig 6).

Bottom Line: Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies.We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8m (95% CI: 49.9m, 56.8m) and Malaysia: 58.0m (95% CI: 51.1m, 71.0m).The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed.

Methodology/principal findings: The dispersal ability of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8m (95% CI: 49.9m, 56.8m) and Malaysia: 58.0m (95% CI: 51.1m, 71.0m).

Conclusions/significance: Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus