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Prevalence of amyloid deposition in mature healthy chickens in the flock that previously had outbreaks of vaccine-associated amyloidosis.

Ibi K, Murakami T, Goda WM, Kobayashi N, Ishiguro N, Yanai T - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens.These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age.Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Avian amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds with chronic inflammation, such as that caused by bacterial infection. We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens. In this study, the prevalence of amyloid deposition was measured in mature healthy chickens that survived a previous outbreak of avian AA amyloidosis while they were juveniles. Herein, we analyzed the amyloid deposition in mature chickens and compared the prevalence of amyloid deposition with juvenile chickens obtained in our previous study (Murakami et al., 2013). We found that: 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, while juvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36% of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; 3) amyloid deposition in the pectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens (88%). These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age. Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of amyloid deposition in juvenile chickens (J, dark bars) referred fromthe previous study [12] and mature chickens (A,pale bars) in this study.
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fig_003: Prevalence of amyloid deposition in juvenile chickens (J, dark bars) referred fromthe previous study [12] and mature chickens (A,pale bars) in this study.

Mentions: The comparison of the prevalence of amyloid deposition between juvenile chickens in theprevious study [13] and mature chickens in this studyshowed that; 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, whilejuvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36%of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; and 3) amyloid deposition in thepectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens(88%) (Fig. 3Fig. 3.


Prevalence of amyloid deposition in mature healthy chickens in the flock that previously had outbreaks of vaccine-associated amyloidosis.

Ibi K, Murakami T, Goda WM, Kobayashi N, Ishiguro N, Yanai T - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Prevalence of amyloid deposition in juvenile chickens (J, dark bars) referred fromthe previous study [12] and mature chickens (A,pale bars) in this study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4638290&req=5

fig_003: Prevalence of amyloid deposition in juvenile chickens (J, dark bars) referred fromthe previous study [12] and mature chickens (A,pale bars) in this study.
Mentions: The comparison of the prevalence of amyloid deposition between juvenile chickens in theprevious study [13] and mature chickens in this studyshowed that; 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, whilejuvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36%of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; and 3) amyloid deposition in thepectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens(88%) (Fig. 3Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens.These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age.Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Avian amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds with chronic inflammation, such as that caused by bacterial infection. We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens. In this study, the prevalence of amyloid deposition was measured in mature healthy chickens that survived a previous outbreak of avian AA amyloidosis while they were juveniles. Herein, we analyzed the amyloid deposition in mature chickens and compared the prevalence of amyloid deposition with juvenile chickens obtained in our previous study (Murakami et al., 2013). We found that: 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, while juvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36% of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; 3) amyloid deposition in the pectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens (88%). These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age. Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus