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Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

Ingrid L, Chloé B, Hervé KI, Ernest B, Jérôme M, Nicolas B - Infect. Agents Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries.The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption.The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoonosis and Emerging Diseases, Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville - Gabon (CIRMF - GABON), B.P. 769 Franceville, Gabon.

ABSTRACT
Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated age-standardized Incidence (ASIR) and Mortality (ASMR) rates of HNSCC in 2012. Graphic representations and associated numbers (105 persons per year) of incidence and mortality rates of all HNSCC worldwide and in various regions. Bars for Gabon, country of interest here, are in red/pink whereas they are black/grey for Europe, Northern America, Middle Africa and worldwide (as World). Dark bars (red for Gabon and black for other regions) represent the incidence rates and the light ones (pink for Gabon and grey for other regions) represent the mortality rates. (Source: GLOBOCAN 2012) [1, 2]
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Fig1: Estimated age-standardized Incidence (ASIR) and Mortality (ASMR) rates of HNSCC in 2012. Graphic representations and associated numbers (105 persons per year) of incidence and mortality rates of all HNSCC worldwide and in various regions. Bars for Gabon, country of interest here, are in red/pink whereas they are black/grey for Europe, Northern America, Middle Africa and worldwide (as World). Dark bars (red for Gabon and black for other regions) represent the incidence rates and the light ones (pink for Gabon and grey for other regions) represent the mortality rates. (Source: GLOBOCAN 2012) [1, 2]

Mentions: In Middle Africa, the incidence of HNSCC (100,000 new cases/year) is lower than the worldwide rate (respectively 4.5 versus 8.0), except in Gabon where reported rates are 2–3 fold higher (9.4) (Fig. 1) [1, 11, 12]. However, it is doubtful that these numbers perfectly reflect the true HNSCC rates in Middle Africa and in Gabon. As elsewhere in Africa, cancer registration is not routinely implemented yet in the healthcare institutions managing cancers. Attributing the differences between Gabon and the rest of Middle Africa to a true susceptibility of the Gabonese population or simply to a better screening/registering/follow-up of HNSCC is a real challenge. In any case, the main issue remains: how to manage HNSCC, which could become a real public health problem, in Gabon?Fig. 1


Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

Ingrid L, Chloé B, Hervé KI, Ernest B, Jérôme M, Nicolas B - Infect. Agents Cancer (2015)

Estimated age-standardized Incidence (ASIR) and Mortality (ASMR) rates of HNSCC in 2012. Graphic representations and associated numbers (105 persons per year) of incidence and mortality rates of all HNSCC worldwide and in various regions. Bars for Gabon, country of interest here, are in red/pink whereas they are black/grey for Europe, Northern America, Middle Africa and worldwide (as World). Dark bars (red for Gabon and black for other regions) represent the incidence rates and the light ones (pink for Gabon and grey for other regions) represent the mortality rates. (Source: GLOBOCAN 2012) [1, 2]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4638083&req=5

Fig1: Estimated age-standardized Incidence (ASIR) and Mortality (ASMR) rates of HNSCC in 2012. Graphic representations and associated numbers (105 persons per year) of incidence and mortality rates of all HNSCC worldwide and in various regions. Bars for Gabon, country of interest here, are in red/pink whereas they are black/grey for Europe, Northern America, Middle Africa and worldwide (as World). Dark bars (red for Gabon and black for other regions) represent the incidence rates and the light ones (pink for Gabon and grey for other regions) represent the mortality rates. (Source: GLOBOCAN 2012) [1, 2]
Mentions: In Middle Africa, the incidence of HNSCC (100,000 new cases/year) is lower than the worldwide rate (respectively 4.5 versus 8.0), except in Gabon where reported rates are 2–3 fold higher (9.4) (Fig. 1) [1, 11, 12]. However, it is doubtful that these numbers perfectly reflect the true HNSCC rates in Middle Africa and in Gabon. As elsewhere in Africa, cancer registration is not routinely implemented yet in the healthcare institutions managing cancers. Attributing the differences between Gabon and the rest of Middle Africa to a true susceptibility of the Gabonese population or simply to a better screening/registering/follow-up of HNSCC is a real challenge. In any case, the main issue remains: how to manage HNSCC, which could become a real public health problem, in Gabon?Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries.The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption.The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoonosis and Emerging Diseases, Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville - Gabon (CIRMF - GABON), B.P. 769 Franceville, Gabon.

ABSTRACT
Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus