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Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy Appear Not to Be Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Later in Life.

Abheiden CN, van Doornik R, Aukes AM, van der Flier WM, Scheltens P, de Groot CJ - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2015)

Bottom Line: Paper and telephone surveys were performed.The response rate was 85.2%.No relation between women with (n = 104) and without AD (n = 129) reporting pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders (p = 0.11) was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: After hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, more subjective cognitive complaints and white matter lesions are reported compared to women after normal pregnancies. Both have a causal relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Aim: To investigate if women whose pregnancy was complicated by hypertensive disorders have an increased risk of AD.

Methods: A case-control study in women with AD from the Alzheimer Center of the VU University Medical Center Amsterdam and women without AD. Paper and telephone surveys were performed.

Results: The response rate was 85.2%. No relation between women with (n = 104) and without AD (n = 129) reporting pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders (p = 0.11) was found. Women with early-onset AD reported hypertensive disorders of pregnancy more often (p = 0.02) compared to women with late-onset AD.

Conclusion: A reported history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy appears not to be associated with AD later in life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Figure 1: Study flow diagram.

Mentions: In total, 500 women were identified from the database of the Alzheimer Center of the VU University Medical Center; 251 women with AD and 249 women with a partner with AD. The overall response rate was 85.2%, 201 women with AD and 225 women without AD, consisting of 102 women responding to paper surveys in each group (40.6 and 40.9%, respectively), and 99 (39.4%) women with AD and 123 (49.4%) women without AD responding to telephone survey. Of these 426 women, we excluded 169 women: 28 women due to iparity, 16 women due to diagnoses of dementia different from AD (e.g. vascular dementia or mild cognitive impairment), 32 women were not willing or able to participate in the study (e.g. they could not answer the questions themselves anymore, carers did not have the time for it), 9 women were deceased, 57 participants gave incomplete responses, 9 men had no (female) partner, and finally 18 women were nonresponders due to other reasons (e.g. they had a new partner who did not know anything about the pregnancies of his wife). As described in figure 1, a total of 257 women were analyzed, 118 women with AD and 139 without. Of the women with AD, 43.2% were diagnosed with early-onset AD. Thirty-one women with AD (26.5%) and 132 (95.7%) without AD answered the survey themselves. In 2 paper surveys (1 woman with and 1 without AD), the reporter was unclear. The mean time interval between the birth of the first child and the survey was 41.2 years for women with AD and 39.2 years for women without AD (p = 0.12).


Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy Appear Not to Be Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Later in Life.

Abheiden CN, van Doornik R, Aukes AM, van der Flier WM, Scheltens P, de Groot CJ - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2015)

Study flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4637816&req=5

Figure 1: Study flow diagram.
Mentions: In total, 500 women were identified from the database of the Alzheimer Center of the VU University Medical Center; 251 women with AD and 249 women with a partner with AD. The overall response rate was 85.2%, 201 women with AD and 225 women without AD, consisting of 102 women responding to paper surveys in each group (40.6 and 40.9%, respectively), and 99 (39.4%) women with AD and 123 (49.4%) women without AD responding to telephone survey. Of these 426 women, we excluded 169 women: 28 women due to iparity, 16 women due to diagnoses of dementia different from AD (e.g. vascular dementia or mild cognitive impairment), 32 women were not willing or able to participate in the study (e.g. they could not answer the questions themselves anymore, carers did not have the time for it), 9 women were deceased, 57 participants gave incomplete responses, 9 men had no (female) partner, and finally 18 women were nonresponders due to other reasons (e.g. they had a new partner who did not know anything about the pregnancies of his wife). As described in figure 1, a total of 257 women were analyzed, 118 women with AD and 139 without. Of the women with AD, 43.2% were diagnosed with early-onset AD. Thirty-one women with AD (26.5%) and 132 (95.7%) without AD answered the survey themselves. In 2 paper surveys (1 woman with and 1 without AD), the reporter was unclear. The mean time interval between the birth of the first child and the survey was 41.2 years for women with AD and 39.2 years for women without AD (p = 0.12).

Bottom Line: Paper and telephone surveys were performed.The response rate was 85.2%.No relation between women with (n = 104) and without AD (n = 129) reporting pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders (p = 0.11) was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: After hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, more subjective cognitive complaints and white matter lesions are reported compared to women after normal pregnancies. Both have a causal relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Aim: To investigate if women whose pregnancy was complicated by hypertensive disorders have an increased risk of AD.

Methods: A case-control study in women with AD from the Alzheimer Center of the VU University Medical Center Amsterdam and women without AD. Paper and telephone surveys were performed.

Results: The response rate was 85.2%. No relation between women with (n = 104) and without AD (n = 129) reporting pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders (p = 0.11) was found. Women with early-onset AD reported hypertensive disorders of pregnancy more often (p = 0.02) compared to women with late-onset AD.

Conclusion: A reported history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy appears not to be associated with AD later in life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus