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Durable Mechanical Circulatory Support versus Organ Transplantation: Past, Present, and Future.

Anand J, Singh SK, Antoun DG, Cohn WE, Frazier OH, Mallidi HR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: For more than 30 years, heart transplantation has been a successful therapy for patients with terminal heart failure.Because of donor scarcity and limited long-term survival, heart transplantation has had a trivial impact on the epidemiology of heart failure.Surgical implementation of MCS, both for short- and long-term treatment, affords physicians an opportunity for dramatic expansion of a meaningful therapy for these otherwise mortally ill patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Center for Cardiac Support, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
For more than 30 years, heart transplantation has been a successful therapy for patients with terminal heart failure. Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) was developed as a therapy for end-stage heart failure at a time when cardiac transplantation was not yet a useful treatment modality. With the more successful outcomes of cardiac transplantation in the 1980s, MCS was applied as a bridge to transplantation. Because of donor scarcity and limited long-term survival, heart transplantation has had a trivial impact on the epidemiology of heart failure. Surgical implementation of MCS, both for short- and long-term treatment, affords physicians an opportunity for dramatic expansion of a meaningful therapy for these otherwise mortally ill patients. This review explores the evolution of mechanical circulatory support and its potential for providing long-term therapy, which may address the limitations of cardiac transplantation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

HeartMate devices: the HeartMate II LVAD ((a)/(b)) is currently approved as a bridge to transplantation and as a destination therapy. The HeartMate III LVAD ((c)/(d)) is a new, third-generation centrifugal pump expected to undergo clinical trials in the near future. Images adopted from [51].
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig7: HeartMate devices: the HeartMate II LVAD ((a)/(b)) is currently approved as a bridge to transplantation and as a destination therapy. The HeartMate III LVAD ((c)/(d)) is a new, third-generation centrifugal pump expected to undergo clinical trials in the near future. Images adopted from [51].

Mentions: Two more devices are on the horizon, the HeartWare Miniaturized Ventricular Assist Device (MVAD) (Figure 6) and the HeartMate III (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, California, USA) LVAD (Figure 7). The HeartWare MVAD is unique in that the pump itself resides within the inflow cannula. The magnetically suspended rotor has a wide-bladed design for reduced cellular trauma and provides up to 10 liters per minute of axial blood flow [39]. The MVAdvantage study, A Clinical Trial to Evaluate the HeartWare MVAD System, was recently announced [40].


Durable Mechanical Circulatory Support versus Organ Transplantation: Past, Present, and Future.

Anand J, Singh SK, Antoun DG, Cohn WE, Frazier OH, Mallidi HR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

HeartMate devices: the HeartMate II LVAD ((a)/(b)) is currently approved as a bridge to transplantation and as a destination therapy. The HeartMate III LVAD ((c)/(d)) is a new, third-generation centrifugal pump expected to undergo clinical trials in the near future. Images adopted from [51].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4637061&req=5

fig7: HeartMate devices: the HeartMate II LVAD ((a)/(b)) is currently approved as a bridge to transplantation and as a destination therapy. The HeartMate III LVAD ((c)/(d)) is a new, third-generation centrifugal pump expected to undergo clinical trials in the near future. Images adopted from [51].
Mentions: Two more devices are on the horizon, the HeartWare Miniaturized Ventricular Assist Device (MVAD) (Figure 6) and the HeartMate III (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, California, USA) LVAD (Figure 7). The HeartWare MVAD is unique in that the pump itself resides within the inflow cannula. The magnetically suspended rotor has a wide-bladed design for reduced cellular trauma and provides up to 10 liters per minute of axial blood flow [39]. The MVAdvantage study, A Clinical Trial to Evaluate the HeartWare MVAD System, was recently announced [40].

Bottom Line: For more than 30 years, heart transplantation has been a successful therapy for patients with terminal heart failure.Because of donor scarcity and limited long-term survival, heart transplantation has had a trivial impact on the epidemiology of heart failure.Surgical implementation of MCS, both for short- and long-term treatment, affords physicians an opportunity for dramatic expansion of a meaningful therapy for these otherwise mortally ill patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Center for Cardiac Support, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
For more than 30 years, heart transplantation has been a successful therapy for patients with terminal heart failure. Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) was developed as a therapy for end-stage heart failure at a time when cardiac transplantation was not yet a useful treatment modality. With the more successful outcomes of cardiac transplantation in the 1980s, MCS was applied as a bridge to transplantation. Because of donor scarcity and limited long-term survival, heart transplantation has had a trivial impact on the epidemiology of heart failure. Surgical implementation of MCS, both for short- and long-term treatment, affords physicians an opportunity for dramatic expansion of a meaningful therapy for these otherwise mortally ill patients. This review explores the evolution of mechanical circulatory support and its potential for providing long-term therapy, which may address the limitations of cardiac transplantation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus