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Clinical End-Points Associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Lung Cancer: Implications into Host-Pathogen Interaction and Coevolution.

Tian Y, Hao T, Cao B, Zhang W, Ma Y, Lin Q, Li X - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: In this context, we examined the association between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with its L-forms (MTB-L) and lung cancer.Through generalized linear models and random forest models, we have further identified a set of clinical end-points that are strongly associated with MTB-L presence.Our finding provides the basis for future studies to investigate the underlying mechanism linking MTB-L infection to lung cancer development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Laboratory, North China Oilfield Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Renqiu, Hebei 062552, China.

ABSTRACT
There is a recent emerging theory that suggests a cross-link between pathogens and cancer. In this context, we examined the association between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with its L-forms (MTB-L) and lung cancer. In the present study, we have optimized and applied a highly sensitive assay to detect the presence of MTB and MTB-L in 187 lung cancer samples and 39 samples of other cancer origins. By carefully controlling confounding factors, we have found that 62% of the lung cancer samples are MTB-L positive, while only 5.1% of the other cancer samples are MTB-L positive. Through generalized linear models and random forest models, we have further identified a set of clinical end-points that are strongly associated with MTB-L presence. Our finding provides the basis for future studies to investigate the underlying mechanism linking MTB-L infection to lung cancer development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Higher presence of MTB-L in the lung cancer samples compared to samples of other cancer types by the IK method alone.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Higher presence of MTB-L in the lung cancer samples compared to samples of other cancer types by the IK method alone.

Mentions: A total of 187 lung cancer samples were collected for the present study. Of these samples, 19 patients had a documented prior medical history of TB and 113 had no reported TB history, while the remaining 55 patients were missing this information. We selected the 113 samples with no reported TB history to compare with 39 samples of other cancer types without prior TB medical history. As shown in Figure 3, MTB-L was detected from 70 of the 113 lung cancer samples (61.9%), a statistically significant (P value = 2.2e − 16) contrast with the samples from other cancer types (2 of 39, 5.1%). Among other cancer types, there were one out of 14 gastric cancer samples (7.1%) and one out of six breast cancer samples (16.7%) detected as MTB-L positive, which was still a statistically significant contrast. To increase sensitivity (Figure 4), MTB/MTB-L was detected from 73 of the 113 lung cancer samples (64.6%), which was still significantly (P value = 2.6e − 15) higher than 3 of 39 samples from other cancer types (7.7%). Among other cancer types, there were one out of 14 gastric cancer samples (7.1%) and two out of six breast cancer samples (33.3%) detected as MTB-L positive.


Clinical End-Points Associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Lung Cancer: Implications into Host-Pathogen Interaction and Coevolution.

Tian Y, Hao T, Cao B, Zhang W, Ma Y, Lin Q, Li X - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Higher presence of MTB-L in the lung cancer samples compared to samples of other cancer types by the IK method alone.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4637056&req=5

fig3: Higher presence of MTB-L in the lung cancer samples compared to samples of other cancer types by the IK method alone.
Mentions: A total of 187 lung cancer samples were collected for the present study. Of these samples, 19 patients had a documented prior medical history of TB and 113 had no reported TB history, while the remaining 55 patients were missing this information. We selected the 113 samples with no reported TB history to compare with 39 samples of other cancer types without prior TB medical history. As shown in Figure 3, MTB-L was detected from 70 of the 113 lung cancer samples (61.9%), a statistically significant (P value = 2.2e − 16) contrast with the samples from other cancer types (2 of 39, 5.1%). Among other cancer types, there were one out of 14 gastric cancer samples (7.1%) and one out of six breast cancer samples (16.7%) detected as MTB-L positive, which was still a statistically significant contrast. To increase sensitivity (Figure 4), MTB/MTB-L was detected from 73 of the 113 lung cancer samples (64.6%), which was still significantly (P value = 2.6e − 15) higher than 3 of 39 samples from other cancer types (7.7%). Among other cancer types, there were one out of 14 gastric cancer samples (7.1%) and two out of six breast cancer samples (33.3%) detected as MTB-L positive.

Bottom Line: In this context, we examined the association between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with its L-forms (MTB-L) and lung cancer.Through generalized linear models and random forest models, we have further identified a set of clinical end-points that are strongly associated with MTB-L presence.Our finding provides the basis for future studies to investigate the underlying mechanism linking MTB-L infection to lung cancer development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Laboratory, North China Oilfield Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Renqiu, Hebei 062552, China.

ABSTRACT
There is a recent emerging theory that suggests a cross-link between pathogens and cancer. In this context, we examined the association between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with its L-forms (MTB-L) and lung cancer. In the present study, we have optimized and applied a highly sensitive assay to detect the presence of MTB and MTB-L in 187 lung cancer samples and 39 samples of other cancer origins. By carefully controlling confounding factors, we have found that 62% of the lung cancer samples are MTB-L positive, while only 5.1% of the other cancer samples are MTB-L positive. Through generalized linear models and random forest models, we have further identified a set of clinical end-points that are strongly associated with MTB-L presence. Our finding provides the basis for future studies to investigate the underlying mechanism linking MTB-L infection to lung cancer development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus