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Neural Processing of Emotional Prosody across the Adult Lifespan.

Demenescu LR, Kato Y, Mathiak K - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Changes in emotional prosody and voice gender elicited bilateral superior temporal gyri (STG) responses reflecting automatic encoding of prosody.At the right STG, responses to sad deviants decreased linearly with age, whereas happy events exhibited a nonlinear relationship.However, top-down modulation may lead to an additional perceptional bias, for example, towards positive stimuli, and may depend on context factors such as the listener's sex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital Aachen, RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen, Germany ; Clinical Affective Neuroimaging Laboratory, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany ; Department of Neurology, Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany ; Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Emotion recognition deficits emerge with the increasing age, in particular, a decline in the identification of sadness. However, little is known about the age-related changes of emotion processing in sensory, affective, and executive brain areas. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated neural correlates of auditory processing of prosody across adult lifespan. Unattended detection of emotional prosody changes was assessed in 21 young (age range: 18-35 years), 19 middle-aged (age range: 36-55 years), and 15 older (age range: 56-75 years) adults. Pseudowords uttered with neutral prosody were standards in an oddball paradigm with angry, sad, happy, and gender deviants (total 20% deviants). Changes in emotional prosody and voice gender elicited bilateral superior temporal gyri (STG) responses reflecting automatic encoding of prosody. At the right STG, responses to sad deviants decreased linearly with age, whereas happy events exhibited a nonlinear relationship. In contrast to behavioral data, no age by sex interaction emerged on the neural networks. The aging decline of emotion processing of prosodic cues emerges already at an early automatic stage of information processing at the level of the auditory cortex. However, top-down modulation may lead to an additional perceptional bias, for example, towards positive stimuli, and may depend on context factors such as the listener's sex.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Group by deviant type interaction at the right STG ([x = 54, y = 8, z = 1], p < 0.05 few correction for bSTL). (b) Bar plots depict % bold effect and the 90% confidence interval (C.I.), gray lines, in right STG within each group and for each deviant. Stars indicate significant groups differences (p < 0.05). (c) The relation between age and right STG response to happy prosody reveals an inverted U-shape. A: angry, H: happy, S: sad, and G: gender (male).
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fig3: (a) Group by deviant type interaction at the right STG ([x = 54, y = 8, z = 1], p < 0.05 few correction for bSTL). (b) Bar plots depict % bold effect and the 90% confidence interval (C.I.), gray lines, in right STG within each group and for each deviant. Stars indicate significant groups differences (p < 0.05). (c) The relation between age and right STG response to happy prosody reveals an inverted U-shape. A: angry, H: happy, S: sad, and G: gender (male).

Mentions: A significant group by deviant type interaction emerged in the right STG ([54,8, 1], k = 16, Z = 4.15, and p < 0.05 FWE correction for bSTL; Figure 3(a)). No brain areas outside bSTL showed significant effects. To further characterize this interaction, F-tests determined the group effect within each deviant type. Only for happy prosody, a significant group effect emerged (right STG [57, −13,7], k = 34, Z = 4.48, and p = 0.002, FWE correction for bSTL). In post hoc t-tests, responses to happy deviants were larger in middle-aged adults than in young and older adults (Z > 4.48, p < 0.05; Figure 3(b)). No significant difference on right STG response to happy prosody was found between young and older adults. Indeed, as already suggested by the regression analysis in Figure 3(c), response amplitudes and age seemed to vary in an inverted U-shape fashion.


Neural Processing of Emotional Prosody across the Adult Lifespan.

Demenescu LR, Kato Y, Mathiak K - Biomed Res Int (2015)

(a) Group by deviant type interaction at the right STG ([x = 54, y = 8, z = 1], p < 0.05 few correction for bSTL). (b) Bar plots depict % bold effect and the 90% confidence interval (C.I.), gray lines, in right STG within each group and for each deviant. Stars indicate significant groups differences (p < 0.05). (c) The relation between age and right STG response to happy prosody reveals an inverted U-shape. A: angry, H: happy, S: sad, and G: gender (male).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4637042&req=5

fig3: (a) Group by deviant type interaction at the right STG ([x = 54, y = 8, z = 1], p < 0.05 few correction for bSTL). (b) Bar plots depict % bold effect and the 90% confidence interval (C.I.), gray lines, in right STG within each group and for each deviant. Stars indicate significant groups differences (p < 0.05). (c) The relation between age and right STG response to happy prosody reveals an inverted U-shape. A: angry, H: happy, S: sad, and G: gender (male).
Mentions: A significant group by deviant type interaction emerged in the right STG ([54,8, 1], k = 16, Z = 4.15, and p < 0.05 FWE correction for bSTL; Figure 3(a)). No brain areas outside bSTL showed significant effects. To further characterize this interaction, F-tests determined the group effect within each deviant type. Only for happy prosody, a significant group effect emerged (right STG [57, −13,7], k = 34, Z = 4.48, and p = 0.002, FWE correction for bSTL). In post hoc t-tests, responses to happy deviants were larger in middle-aged adults than in young and older adults (Z > 4.48, p < 0.05; Figure 3(b)). No significant difference on right STG response to happy prosody was found between young and older adults. Indeed, as already suggested by the regression analysis in Figure 3(c), response amplitudes and age seemed to vary in an inverted U-shape fashion.

Bottom Line: Changes in emotional prosody and voice gender elicited bilateral superior temporal gyri (STG) responses reflecting automatic encoding of prosody.At the right STG, responses to sad deviants decreased linearly with age, whereas happy events exhibited a nonlinear relationship.However, top-down modulation may lead to an additional perceptional bias, for example, towards positive stimuli, and may depend on context factors such as the listener's sex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital Aachen, RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen, Germany ; Clinical Affective Neuroimaging Laboratory, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany ; Department of Neurology, Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany ; Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Emotion recognition deficits emerge with the increasing age, in particular, a decline in the identification of sadness. However, little is known about the age-related changes of emotion processing in sensory, affective, and executive brain areas. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated neural correlates of auditory processing of prosody across adult lifespan. Unattended detection of emotional prosody changes was assessed in 21 young (age range: 18-35 years), 19 middle-aged (age range: 36-55 years), and 15 older (age range: 56-75 years) adults. Pseudowords uttered with neutral prosody were standards in an oddball paradigm with angry, sad, happy, and gender deviants (total 20% deviants). Changes in emotional prosody and voice gender elicited bilateral superior temporal gyri (STG) responses reflecting automatic encoding of prosody. At the right STG, responses to sad deviants decreased linearly with age, whereas happy events exhibited a nonlinear relationship. In contrast to behavioral data, no age by sex interaction emerged on the neural networks. The aging decline of emotion processing of prosodic cues emerges already at an early automatic stage of information processing at the level of the auditory cortex. However, top-down modulation may lead to an additional perceptional bias, for example, towards positive stimuli, and may depend on context factors such as the listener's sex.

No MeSH data available.