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Canopy Interception for a Tallgrass Prairie under Juniper Encroachment.

Zou CB, Caterina GL, Will RE, Stebler E, Turton D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found.On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie.Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Resource Ecology & Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Rainfall partitioning and redistribution by canopies are important ecohydrological processes underlying ecosystem dynamics. We quantified and contrasted spatial and temporal variations of rainfall redistribution for a juniper (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar) woodland and a tallgrass prairie in the south-central Great Plains, USA. Our results showed that redcedar trees had high canopy storage capacity (S) ranging from 2.14 mm for open stands to 3.44 mm for closed stands. The canopy funneling ratios (F) of redcedar trees varied substantially among stand type and tree size. The open stands and smaller trees usually had higher F values and were more efficient in partitioning rainfall into stemflow. Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found. The S values were highly variable for tallgrass prairie, ranging from 0.27 mm at early growing season to 3.86 mm at senescence. As a result, the rainfall interception by tallgrass prairie was characterized by high temporal instability. On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie. Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie. Our findings support the idea of convergence in interception ratio for different canopy structures under the same precipitation regime. The temporal change in rainfall interception loss from redcedar encroachment is important to understand how juniper encroachment will interact with changing rainfall regime and potentially alter regional streamflow under climate change.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of accumulated interception loss to tallgrass prairie and redcedars.
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pone.0141422.g009: Comparison of accumulated interception loss to tallgrass prairie and redcedars.

Mentions: The accumulated amount of rainfall loss to redcedar canopy was consistently higher than tallgrass prairie until grass senescence (Fig 9). By late November and early December, the accumulated amount of rainfall loss to tallgrass prairie approached and even surpassed that of redcedar (Fig 9). On annual basis, there was no significant difference in interception ratios between redcedar canopy (36.3 ± 4.3% SE) and tallgrass prairie (43.9.0 ± 5.8% SE) (F = 3.13; df = 1,31; p = 0.08).


Canopy Interception for a Tallgrass Prairie under Juniper Encroachment.

Zou CB, Caterina GL, Will RE, Stebler E, Turton D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Comparison of accumulated interception loss to tallgrass prairie and redcedars.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4636379&req=5

pone.0141422.g009: Comparison of accumulated interception loss to tallgrass prairie and redcedars.
Mentions: The accumulated amount of rainfall loss to redcedar canopy was consistently higher than tallgrass prairie until grass senescence (Fig 9). By late November and early December, the accumulated amount of rainfall loss to tallgrass prairie approached and even surpassed that of redcedar (Fig 9). On annual basis, there was no significant difference in interception ratios between redcedar canopy (36.3 ± 4.3% SE) and tallgrass prairie (43.9.0 ± 5.8% SE) (F = 3.13; df = 1,31; p = 0.08).

Bottom Line: Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found.On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie.Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Resource Ecology & Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Rainfall partitioning and redistribution by canopies are important ecohydrological processes underlying ecosystem dynamics. We quantified and contrasted spatial and temporal variations of rainfall redistribution for a juniper (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar) woodland and a tallgrass prairie in the south-central Great Plains, USA. Our results showed that redcedar trees had high canopy storage capacity (S) ranging from 2.14 mm for open stands to 3.44 mm for closed stands. The canopy funneling ratios (F) of redcedar trees varied substantially among stand type and tree size. The open stands and smaller trees usually had higher F values and were more efficient in partitioning rainfall into stemflow. Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found. The S values were highly variable for tallgrass prairie, ranging from 0.27 mm at early growing season to 3.86 mm at senescence. As a result, the rainfall interception by tallgrass prairie was characterized by high temporal instability. On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie. Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie. Our findings support the idea of convergence in interception ratio for different canopy structures under the same precipitation regime. The temporal change in rainfall interception loss from redcedar encroachment is important to understand how juniper encroachment will interact with changing rainfall regime and potentially alter regional streamflow under climate change.

No MeSH data available.