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Time-Dependent Increase in Network Response to Stimulation.

Hamilton F, Graham R, Luu L, Peixoto N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we demonstrate the effects of a high frequency electrical stimulation signal in training cultured networks of cortical neurons.This increase was found to be statistically significant as compared to control networks that did not receive training.The timing of this increase suggests potentiation of synaptic mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In vitro neuronal cultures have become a popular method with which to probe network-level neuronal dynamics and phenomena in controlled laboratory settings. One of the key dynamics of interest in these in vitro studies has been the extent to which cultured networks display properties indicative of learning. Here we demonstrate the effects of a high frequency electrical stimulation signal in training cultured networks of cortical neurons. Networks receiving this training signal displayed a time-dependent increase in the response to a low frequency probing stimulation, particularly in the time window of 20-50 ms after stimulation. This increase was found to be statistically significant as compared to control networks that did not receive training. The timing of this increase suggests potentiation of synaptic mechanisms. To further investigate this possibility, we leveraged the powerful Cox statistical connectivity method as previously investigated by our group. This method was used to identify and track changes in network connectivity strength.

No MeSH data available.


Response to stimulation consists of two phases.Networks receiving CNQX+APV treatment exhibited a substantial decrease in response 20–50 ms after stimulation as compared to pre-drug baseline values. The initial response period of 0–20 ms remained relatively unchanged. This would imply that the network response is comprised of two phases, the later of which is governed synaptically. This suggests that the observed enhancement is the result of synaptic potentiation.
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pone.0142399.g006: Response to stimulation consists of two phases.Networks receiving CNQX+APV treatment exhibited a substantial decrease in response 20–50 ms after stimulation as compared to pre-drug baseline values. The initial response period of 0–20 ms remained relatively unchanged. This would imply that the network response is comprised of two phases, the later of which is governed synaptically. This suggests that the observed enhancement is the result of synaptic potentiation.

Mentions: To investigate the nature of these changes, an additional group of networks (n = 4) were treated with a combination of CNQX+APV. Fig 6 shows the mean normalized spike frequency of these networks over the first 50 ms after probing stimulus. Application of CNQX+APV results in a clear decrease in network response to stimulation as compared to pre-drug baseline values during the time frame of 20–50 ms after stimulus. There was no noticeable difference in network response 0–20 ms after stimulus. These results indicate that the later portion of the stimulus response is driven synaptically, whereas the initial phase is not. This would therefore suggest that the increased response observed in Fig 5 is the result of synaptic enhancement.


Time-Dependent Increase in Network Response to Stimulation.

Hamilton F, Graham R, Luu L, Peixoto N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Response to stimulation consists of two phases.Networks receiving CNQX+APV treatment exhibited a substantial decrease in response 20–50 ms after stimulation as compared to pre-drug baseline values. The initial response period of 0–20 ms remained relatively unchanged. This would imply that the network response is comprised of two phases, the later of which is governed synaptically. This suggests that the observed enhancement is the result of synaptic potentiation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4636320&req=5

pone.0142399.g006: Response to stimulation consists of two phases.Networks receiving CNQX+APV treatment exhibited a substantial decrease in response 20–50 ms after stimulation as compared to pre-drug baseline values. The initial response period of 0–20 ms remained relatively unchanged. This would imply that the network response is comprised of two phases, the later of which is governed synaptically. This suggests that the observed enhancement is the result of synaptic potentiation.
Mentions: To investigate the nature of these changes, an additional group of networks (n = 4) were treated with a combination of CNQX+APV. Fig 6 shows the mean normalized spike frequency of these networks over the first 50 ms after probing stimulus. Application of CNQX+APV results in a clear decrease in network response to stimulation as compared to pre-drug baseline values during the time frame of 20–50 ms after stimulus. There was no noticeable difference in network response 0–20 ms after stimulus. These results indicate that the later portion of the stimulus response is driven synaptically, whereas the initial phase is not. This would therefore suggest that the increased response observed in Fig 5 is the result of synaptic enhancement.

Bottom Line: Here we demonstrate the effects of a high frequency electrical stimulation signal in training cultured networks of cortical neurons.This increase was found to be statistically significant as compared to control networks that did not receive training.The timing of this increase suggests potentiation of synaptic mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In vitro neuronal cultures have become a popular method with which to probe network-level neuronal dynamics and phenomena in controlled laboratory settings. One of the key dynamics of interest in these in vitro studies has been the extent to which cultured networks display properties indicative of learning. Here we demonstrate the effects of a high frequency electrical stimulation signal in training cultured networks of cortical neurons. Networks receiving this training signal displayed a time-dependent increase in the response to a low frequency probing stimulation, particularly in the time window of 20-50 ms after stimulation. This increase was found to be statistically significant as compared to control networks that did not receive training. The timing of this increase suggests potentiation of synaptic mechanisms. To further investigate this possibility, we leveraged the powerful Cox statistical connectivity method as previously investigated by our group. This method was used to identify and track changes in network connectivity strength.

No MeSH data available.