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Phenotypic- and Genotypic-Resistance Detection for Adaptive Resistance Management in Tetranychus urticae Koch.

Kwon DH, Kang TJ, Kim YH, Lee SH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: QS was effective for determining the frequencies of resistance alleles on a population basis, which corresponded to 12 nonsynonymous point mutations associated with target-site resistance to five types of acaricides [organophosphates (monocrotophos, pirimiphos-methyl, dimethoate and chlorpyrifos), pyrethroids (fenpropathrin and bifenthrin), abamectin, bifenazate and etoxazole].Nevertheless, the resistance allele frequency data alone allowed for the evaluation of the genetic resistance potential and background of test mite populations.The combined use of RCV and QS provides basic information on resistance levels, which is essential for choosing appropriate acaricides for the management of resistant T. urticae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Rapid resistance detection is necessary for the adaptive management of acaricide-resistant populations of Tetranychus urticae. Detection of phenotypic and genotypic resistance was conducted by employing residual contact vial bioassay (RCV) and quantitative sequencing (QS) methods, respectively. RCV was useful for detecting the acaricide resistance levels of T. urticae, particularly for on-site resistance detection; however, it was only applicable for rapid-acting acaricides (12 out of 19 tested acaricides). QS was effective for determining the frequencies of resistance alleles on a population basis, which corresponded to 12 nonsynonymous point mutations associated with target-site resistance to five types of acaricides [organophosphates (monocrotophos, pirimiphos-methyl, dimethoate and chlorpyrifos), pyrethroids (fenpropathrin and bifenthrin), abamectin, bifenazate and etoxazole]. Most field-collected mites exhibited high levels of multiple resistance, as determined by RCV and QS data, suggesting the seriousness of their current acaricide resistance status in rose cultivation areas in Korea. The correlation analyses revealed moderate to high levels of positive relationships between the resistance allele frequencies and the actual resistance levels in only five of the acaricides evaluated, which limits the general application of allele frequency as a direct indicator for estimating actual resistance levels. Nevertheless, the resistance allele frequency data alone allowed for the evaluation of the genetic resistance potential and background of test mite populations. The combined use of RCV and QS provides basic information on resistance levels, which is essential for choosing appropriate acaricides for the management of resistant T. urticae.

No MeSH data available.


Phylogenetic tree of Tetranychus mites based on mtCOI partial sequences.Two Oligonychus spp. were used as outgroups. A maximum likelihood test was conducted and a bootstrap value over 50% is shown. The Korean populations are designated with blue circles.
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pone.0139934.g001: Phylogenetic tree of Tetranychus mites based on mtCOI partial sequences.Two Oligonychus spp. were used as outgroups. A maximum likelihood test was conducted and a bootstrap value over 50% is shown. The Korean populations are designated with blue circles.

Mentions: The phylogenetic relationships of 12 Korean strains were analyzed along with other several Tetranychidae species (S1 Table). The tested T. urticae strains were largely divided into two groups (groups A and B, comprising red- and green-type mites) (Fig 1). Group A was commonly composed of both red- (AB736079.1 TuR0171, AB736080.1 TuR0173, AB736081.1 TuR0174 and AB116574.1 HAP 2R) and green-type mites, whereas Group B was only composed of red-type mites. Among the 12 Korean strains tested, seven strains (PyriF, AD, FenR, PTF, 13GG_GY_G1, 13GG_SW_G1 and 13JB_GJ_G1) were clustered within ‘haplotype 1’ (previously defined by [47]) as group A, known as the major green-type mites (Fig 1). Four strains (13CB_JC_R1, 13GG_PJ_R1, 13GG_GY_R1 and AbaR) were closely clustered with haplotype 17 (previously defined by [47]) as group B, known as red-type mites (Fig 1). As a result, both the green-type mites belonging to haplotype 1 and the red-type mites closely related with haplotype 17 were mainly distributed in the greenhouse rose cultivation areas in Korea.


Phenotypic- and Genotypic-Resistance Detection for Adaptive Resistance Management in Tetranychus urticae Koch.

Kwon DH, Kang TJ, Kim YH, Lee SH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Phylogenetic tree of Tetranychus mites based on mtCOI partial sequences.Two Oligonychus spp. were used as outgroups. A maximum likelihood test was conducted and a bootstrap value over 50% is shown. The Korean populations are designated with blue circles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4636269&req=5

pone.0139934.g001: Phylogenetic tree of Tetranychus mites based on mtCOI partial sequences.Two Oligonychus spp. were used as outgroups. A maximum likelihood test was conducted and a bootstrap value over 50% is shown. The Korean populations are designated with blue circles.
Mentions: The phylogenetic relationships of 12 Korean strains were analyzed along with other several Tetranychidae species (S1 Table). The tested T. urticae strains were largely divided into two groups (groups A and B, comprising red- and green-type mites) (Fig 1). Group A was commonly composed of both red- (AB736079.1 TuR0171, AB736080.1 TuR0173, AB736081.1 TuR0174 and AB116574.1 HAP 2R) and green-type mites, whereas Group B was only composed of red-type mites. Among the 12 Korean strains tested, seven strains (PyriF, AD, FenR, PTF, 13GG_GY_G1, 13GG_SW_G1 and 13JB_GJ_G1) were clustered within ‘haplotype 1’ (previously defined by [47]) as group A, known as the major green-type mites (Fig 1). Four strains (13CB_JC_R1, 13GG_PJ_R1, 13GG_GY_R1 and AbaR) were closely clustered with haplotype 17 (previously defined by [47]) as group B, known as red-type mites (Fig 1). As a result, both the green-type mites belonging to haplotype 1 and the red-type mites closely related with haplotype 17 were mainly distributed in the greenhouse rose cultivation areas in Korea.

Bottom Line: QS was effective for determining the frequencies of resistance alleles on a population basis, which corresponded to 12 nonsynonymous point mutations associated with target-site resistance to five types of acaricides [organophosphates (monocrotophos, pirimiphos-methyl, dimethoate and chlorpyrifos), pyrethroids (fenpropathrin and bifenthrin), abamectin, bifenazate and etoxazole].Nevertheless, the resistance allele frequency data alone allowed for the evaluation of the genetic resistance potential and background of test mite populations.The combined use of RCV and QS provides basic information on resistance levels, which is essential for choosing appropriate acaricides for the management of resistant T. urticae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Rapid resistance detection is necessary for the adaptive management of acaricide-resistant populations of Tetranychus urticae. Detection of phenotypic and genotypic resistance was conducted by employing residual contact vial bioassay (RCV) and quantitative sequencing (QS) methods, respectively. RCV was useful for detecting the acaricide resistance levels of T. urticae, particularly for on-site resistance detection; however, it was only applicable for rapid-acting acaricides (12 out of 19 tested acaricides). QS was effective for determining the frequencies of resistance alleles on a population basis, which corresponded to 12 nonsynonymous point mutations associated with target-site resistance to five types of acaricides [organophosphates (monocrotophos, pirimiphos-methyl, dimethoate and chlorpyrifos), pyrethroids (fenpropathrin and bifenthrin), abamectin, bifenazate and etoxazole]. Most field-collected mites exhibited high levels of multiple resistance, as determined by RCV and QS data, suggesting the seriousness of their current acaricide resistance status in rose cultivation areas in Korea. The correlation analyses revealed moderate to high levels of positive relationships between the resistance allele frequencies and the actual resistance levels in only five of the acaricides evaluated, which limits the general application of allele frequency as a direct indicator for estimating actual resistance levels. Nevertheless, the resistance allele frequency data alone allowed for the evaluation of the genetic resistance potential and background of test mite populations. The combined use of RCV and QS provides basic information on resistance levels, which is essential for choosing appropriate acaricides for the management of resistant T. urticae.

No MeSH data available.