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From Innovation to Diversification: A Simple Competitive Model.

Saracco F, Di Clemente R, Gabrielli A, Pietronero L - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products.Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network.In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi - ISC CNR UoS "Sapienza" Physics Department Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Few attempts have been proposed in order to describe the statistical features and historical evolution of the export bipartite matrix countries/products. An important standpoint is the introduction of a products network, namely a hierarchical forest of products that models the formation and the evolution of commodities. In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products. Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network. In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The evolution of the diversification against the simulation time.In (a) all countries, but those whose initial conditions have been particularly unlucky, evolve, boosting their diversification; in the cyan area, i.e. during the saturation regime, highly diversified countries experience an evolution different from others. In effect, it is possible to observe, once focusing on the highest fitness countries, (b), that all of them experience a growth with a S–curve profile, which is peculiar of biologic and economics system with finite resources. Note the other less diversified countries, (c), this phenomenon is not present; effectively the main target of the saturation regime is reducing the gap between the diversification of fully developed and developing countries.
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pone.0140420.g008: The evolution of the diversification against the simulation time.In (a) all countries, but those whose initial conditions have been particularly unlucky, evolve, boosting their diversification; in the cyan area, i.e. during the saturation regime, highly diversified countries experience an evolution different from others. In effect, it is possible to observe, once focusing on the highest fitness countries, (b), that all of them experience a growth with a S–curve profile, which is peculiar of biologic and economics system with finite resources. Note the other less diversified countries, (c), this phenomenon is not present; effectively the main target of the saturation regime is reducing the gap between the diversification of fully developed and developing countries.

Mentions: The same effect can be observed directly on the distribution of diversification over countries; Fig 8 shows that there is an abrupt raise in the diversification during the evolution for few countries, while others experience a slower evolution (again, on the horizontal axis there are the time steps of the simulation). Moreover, the most diversified countries, i.e. those which feel strongly the decrease in the probability of being selected due to the saturation, show an S–shaped profile of the evolution curve, Fig 8(b): after a steep raising slope, the saturation time determines a slow increase towards a limiting value. Fig 8(c) illustrates that not all countries show such a S–shaped behaviour due to the presence of the saturation stage, but just those with high diversification; others do not occupy the products network enough for feeling the difference between the products network growth and the saturation regime. The presence of such an S–shape curve is also typical in evolutionary models in biology and socio-economics, when resources are limited, [40, 41].


From Innovation to Diversification: A Simple Competitive Model.

Saracco F, Di Clemente R, Gabrielli A, Pietronero L - PLoS ONE (2015)

The evolution of the diversification against the simulation time.In (a) all countries, but those whose initial conditions have been particularly unlucky, evolve, boosting their diversification; in the cyan area, i.e. during the saturation regime, highly diversified countries experience an evolution different from others. In effect, it is possible to observe, once focusing on the highest fitness countries, (b), that all of them experience a growth with a S–curve profile, which is peculiar of biologic and economics system with finite resources. Note the other less diversified countries, (c), this phenomenon is not present; effectively the main target of the saturation regime is reducing the gap between the diversification of fully developed and developing countries.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4636243&req=5

pone.0140420.g008: The evolution of the diversification against the simulation time.In (a) all countries, but those whose initial conditions have been particularly unlucky, evolve, boosting their diversification; in the cyan area, i.e. during the saturation regime, highly diversified countries experience an evolution different from others. In effect, it is possible to observe, once focusing on the highest fitness countries, (b), that all of them experience a growth with a S–curve profile, which is peculiar of biologic and economics system with finite resources. Note the other less diversified countries, (c), this phenomenon is not present; effectively the main target of the saturation regime is reducing the gap between the diversification of fully developed and developing countries.
Mentions: The same effect can be observed directly on the distribution of diversification over countries; Fig 8 shows that there is an abrupt raise in the diversification during the evolution for few countries, while others experience a slower evolution (again, on the horizontal axis there are the time steps of the simulation). Moreover, the most diversified countries, i.e. those which feel strongly the decrease in the probability of being selected due to the saturation, show an S–shaped profile of the evolution curve, Fig 8(b): after a steep raising slope, the saturation time determines a slow increase towards a limiting value. Fig 8(c) illustrates that not all countries show such a S–shaped behaviour due to the presence of the saturation stage, but just those with high diversification; others do not occupy the products network enough for feeling the difference between the products network growth and the saturation regime. The presence of such an S–shape curve is also typical in evolutionary models in biology and socio-economics, when resources are limited, [40, 41].

Bottom Line: In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products.Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network.In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi - ISC CNR UoS "Sapienza" Physics Department Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Few attempts have been proposed in order to describe the statistical features and historical evolution of the export bipartite matrix countries/products. An important standpoint is the introduction of a products network, namely a hierarchical forest of products that models the formation and the evolution of commodities. In the present article, we propose a simple dynamical model where countries compete with each other to acquire the ability to produce and export new products. Countries will have two possibilities to expand their export: innovating, i.e. introducing new goods, namely new nodes in the product networks, or copying the productive process of others, i.e. occupying a node already present in the same network. In this way, the topology of the products network and the country-product matrix evolve simultaneously, driven by the countries push toward innovation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus