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The Neutrophil-Platelet Score (NPS) Predicts Survival in Primary Operable Colorectal Cancer and a Variety of Common Cancers.

Watt DG, Proctor MJ, Park JH, Horgan PG, McMillan DC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This confirms the importance of the innate immune system in the elaboration of the systemic inflammatory response.In patients undergoing elective surgery, cancer-specific survival (CSS) at 5 years ranged from 97% in patients with TNM I disease and NPS = 0 to 57% in patients with TNM III disease and NPS = 2 (p = 0.019) and in patients undergoing elective surgery for node-negative colon cancer from 98% (TNM I, NPS = 0) to 65% (TNM II, NPS = 2) (p = 0.004).On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age and sex and stratified by tumour site, incremental increase in the NPS was significantly associated with poorer CSS (p<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine-University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that a critical checkpoint early in the inflammatory process involves the interaction between neutrophils and platelets. This confirms the importance of the innate immune system in the elaboration of the systemic inflammatory response. The aim of the present study was to examine whether a combination of the neutrophil and platelet counts were predictive of survival in patients with cancer.

Methods: Patients with histologically proven colorectal cancer who underwent potentially curative resection at a single centre between March 1999 and May 2013 (n = 796) and patients with cancer from the Glasgow Inflammation Outcome Study, who had a blood sample taken between January 2000 and December 2007 (n = 9649) were included in the analysis.

Results: In the colorectal cancer cohort, there were 173 cancer and 135 non-cancer deaths. In patients undergoing elective surgery, cancer-specific survival (CSS) at 5 years ranged from 97% in patients with TNM I disease and NPS = 0 to 57% in patients with TNM III disease and NPS = 2 (p = 0.019) and in patients undergoing elective surgery for node-negative colon cancer from 98% (TNM I, NPS = 0) to 65% (TNM II, NPS = 2) (p = 0.004). In those with a variety of common cancers there were 5218 cancer and 929 non-cancer deaths. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age and sex and stratified by tumour site, incremental increase in the NPS was significantly associated with poorer CSS (p<0.001).

Conclusion: The neutrophil-platelet score predicted survival in a variety of common cancers and highlights the importance of the innate immune system in patients with cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between the NPS and cancer specific survival in each tumour site.NPS 0 (top, small dash line), NPS 1 (middle, large dash line) and NPS 2 (bottom, solid line).Breast p<0.001, bladder <0.001, gynaecological <0.001, prostatic <0.001, gastroesophageal <0.001, renal <0.001, colorectal <0.001, head and neck <0.001, HPB = 0.009 and pulmonary <0.001.
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pone.0142159.g002: The relationship between the NPS and cancer specific survival in each tumour site.NPS 0 (top, small dash line), NPS 1 (middle, large dash line) and NPS 2 (bottom, solid line).Breast p<0.001, bladder <0.001, gynaecological <0.001, prostatic <0.001, gastroesophageal <0.001, renal <0.001, colorectal <0.001, head and neck <0.001, HPB = 0.009 and pulmonary <0.001.

Mentions: On Kaplan Meier survival analysis, a greater neutrophil-platelet score is associated with poorer cancer-specific survival in all patients (p < 0.001) Fig 1. On Kaplan Meier survival analysis, based on individual tumour types Fig 2, increasing NPS was significantly associated with poorer cancer-specific survival in patients with breast (p < 0.001), bladder (p < 0.001), colorectal (p < 0.001), gastroeosophageal (p < 0.001), gynaecological (p < 0.001), head and neck (p < 0.001), Hepaticopancreaticobiliary (HPB) (p = 0.009), prostatic (p < 0.001), pulmonary (p < 0.001) and renal cancers (p < 0.001).


The Neutrophil-Platelet Score (NPS) Predicts Survival in Primary Operable Colorectal Cancer and a Variety of Common Cancers.

Watt DG, Proctor MJ, Park JH, Horgan PG, McMillan DC - PLoS ONE (2015)

The relationship between the NPS and cancer specific survival in each tumour site.NPS 0 (top, small dash line), NPS 1 (middle, large dash line) and NPS 2 (bottom, solid line).Breast p<0.001, bladder <0.001, gynaecological <0.001, prostatic <0.001, gastroesophageal <0.001, renal <0.001, colorectal <0.001, head and neck <0.001, HPB = 0.009 and pulmonary <0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4636235&req=5

pone.0142159.g002: The relationship between the NPS and cancer specific survival in each tumour site.NPS 0 (top, small dash line), NPS 1 (middle, large dash line) and NPS 2 (bottom, solid line).Breast p<0.001, bladder <0.001, gynaecological <0.001, prostatic <0.001, gastroesophageal <0.001, renal <0.001, colorectal <0.001, head and neck <0.001, HPB = 0.009 and pulmonary <0.001.
Mentions: On Kaplan Meier survival analysis, a greater neutrophil-platelet score is associated with poorer cancer-specific survival in all patients (p < 0.001) Fig 1. On Kaplan Meier survival analysis, based on individual tumour types Fig 2, increasing NPS was significantly associated with poorer cancer-specific survival in patients with breast (p < 0.001), bladder (p < 0.001), colorectal (p < 0.001), gastroeosophageal (p < 0.001), gynaecological (p < 0.001), head and neck (p < 0.001), Hepaticopancreaticobiliary (HPB) (p = 0.009), prostatic (p < 0.001), pulmonary (p < 0.001) and renal cancers (p < 0.001).

Bottom Line: This confirms the importance of the innate immune system in the elaboration of the systemic inflammatory response.In patients undergoing elective surgery, cancer-specific survival (CSS) at 5 years ranged from 97% in patients with TNM I disease and NPS = 0 to 57% in patients with TNM III disease and NPS = 2 (p = 0.019) and in patients undergoing elective surgery for node-negative colon cancer from 98% (TNM I, NPS = 0) to 65% (TNM II, NPS = 2) (p = 0.004).On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age and sex and stratified by tumour site, incremental increase in the NPS was significantly associated with poorer CSS (p<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine-University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that a critical checkpoint early in the inflammatory process involves the interaction between neutrophils and platelets. This confirms the importance of the innate immune system in the elaboration of the systemic inflammatory response. The aim of the present study was to examine whether a combination of the neutrophil and platelet counts were predictive of survival in patients with cancer.

Methods: Patients with histologically proven colorectal cancer who underwent potentially curative resection at a single centre between March 1999 and May 2013 (n = 796) and patients with cancer from the Glasgow Inflammation Outcome Study, who had a blood sample taken between January 2000 and December 2007 (n = 9649) were included in the analysis.

Results: In the colorectal cancer cohort, there were 173 cancer and 135 non-cancer deaths. In patients undergoing elective surgery, cancer-specific survival (CSS) at 5 years ranged from 97% in patients with TNM I disease and NPS = 0 to 57% in patients with TNM III disease and NPS = 2 (p = 0.019) and in patients undergoing elective surgery for node-negative colon cancer from 98% (TNM I, NPS = 0) to 65% (TNM II, NPS = 2) (p = 0.004). In those with a variety of common cancers there were 5218 cancer and 929 non-cancer deaths. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age and sex and stratified by tumour site, incremental increase in the NPS was significantly associated with poorer CSS (p<0.001).

Conclusion: The neutrophil-platelet score predicted survival in a variety of common cancers and highlights the importance of the innate immune system in patients with cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus