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New Approach for the Development of Improved Traditional Medicine: Case of a Preparation of an Oral Hypoglycemic Medicine from Laportea ovalifolia (Schumach. & Thonn.) Chew. (Urticaceae).

Tsabang N, Kadjob S, Mballa RN, Yedjou CG, Nnanga N, Donfagsiteli NT, Tchinda AT, Agbor GA, Ntsama C, Tchounwou PB - J Mol Pharm Org Process Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to describe and apply a new approach for the development of an improved traditional medicine (ITM) that is cheap, very efficient, not toxic, and easy to produce, and that can be conserved for a longer time without a significant loss of activity.A relationship between these four formulations was described as follow: One spoon of oral suspension (10 ml)=one sachet of powder=2 tablets=3 capsules.Hence, our research provides new insight into a drug discovery approach that could alleviate the major problems affecting traditional medicine and enhance its effectiveness in addressing health care in developing and undeveloped countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research on Medicinal Plants and Traditional Medicine, Institute of Medical Research and Medicinal Plants Studies (IMPM), Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; High Institute of Environmental Sciences, Yaoundé, Cameroon.

ABSTRACT

A majority of Africans rely on traditional medicine as the primary form of health care. Yet most traditional medicine products have a short shelf life, especially for water-based formulations such as macerations, infusions and decoctions. Indeed, many of these water extracts become unfit for human consumption after five to seven days of conservation either because of the degradation or toxicity of active components, and/or the growth of pathogenic organisms. The purpose of this study was to describe and apply a new approach for the development of an improved traditional medicine (ITM) that is cheap, very efficient, not toxic, and easy to produce, and that can be conserved for a longer time without a significant loss of activity. Hence, Laportea ovalifolia was selected from an ethnobotanical prospection in all regions of Cameroon, and was used to prepare an oral hypoglycemic product. This preparation required 9 steps focused on the characterization of the plant species, and the standardization of the ethnopharmacological preparation by a multidisciplinary team of scientists with expertise in botany, ecology, pharmacognosy and pharmacology. Resultantly, four galenic formulations of hypoglycemic medications were produced. A relationship between these four formulations was described as follow: One spoon of oral suspension (10 ml)=one sachet of powder=2 tablets=3 capsules. Hence, our research provides new insight into a drug discovery approach that could alleviate the major problems affecting traditional medicine and enhance its effectiveness in addressing health care in developing and undeveloped countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Oral suspension (This ITM was prepared in 2007 and this photograph was taken in June 2015 (no oxidation, no deposit at the bottom of the bottle)).
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Figure 1: Oral suspension (This ITM was prepared in 2007 and this photograph was taken in June 2015 (no oxidation, no deposit at the bottom of the bottle)).

Mentions: The aseptic conditions and the good conservation of the ITM are the guarantee of security of the tablets, the capsules, the oral suspension and the powder in sachets (Figures 1-4). The required instruments are easily accessible, and availability of plant materials make it possible to sustain the mass production of our ITM.


New Approach for the Development of Improved Traditional Medicine: Case of a Preparation of an Oral Hypoglycemic Medicine from Laportea ovalifolia (Schumach. & Thonn.) Chew. (Urticaceae).

Tsabang N, Kadjob S, Mballa RN, Yedjou CG, Nnanga N, Donfagsiteli NT, Tchinda AT, Agbor GA, Ntsama C, Tchounwou PB - J Mol Pharm Org Process Res (2015)

Oral suspension (This ITM was prepared in 2007 and this photograph was taken in June 2015 (no oxidation, no deposit at the bottom of the bottle)).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4636220&req=5

Figure 1: Oral suspension (This ITM was prepared in 2007 and this photograph was taken in June 2015 (no oxidation, no deposit at the bottom of the bottle)).
Mentions: The aseptic conditions and the good conservation of the ITM are the guarantee of security of the tablets, the capsules, the oral suspension and the powder in sachets (Figures 1-4). The required instruments are easily accessible, and availability of plant materials make it possible to sustain the mass production of our ITM.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to describe and apply a new approach for the development of an improved traditional medicine (ITM) that is cheap, very efficient, not toxic, and easy to produce, and that can be conserved for a longer time without a significant loss of activity.A relationship between these four formulations was described as follow: One spoon of oral suspension (10 ml)=one sachet of powder=2 tablets=3 capsules.Hence, our research provides new insight into a drug discovery approach that could alleviate the major problems affecting traditional medicine and enhance its effectiveness in addressing health care in developing and undeveloped countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research on Medicinal Plants and Traditional Medicine, Institute of Medical Research and Medicinal Plants Studies (IMPM), Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; High Institute of Environmental Sciences, Yaoundé, Cameroon.

ABSTRACT

A majority of Africans rely on traditional medicine as the primary form of health care. Yet most traditional medicine products have a short shelf life, especially for water-based formulations such as macerations, infusions and decoctions. Indeed, many of these water extracts become unfit for human consumption after five to seven days of conservation either because of the degradation or toxicity of active components, and/or the growth of pathogenic organisms. The purpose of this study was to describe and apply a new approach for the development of an improved traditional medicine (ITM) that is cheap, very efficient, not toxic, and easy to produce, and that can be conserved for a longer time without a significant loss of activity. Hence, Laportea ovalifolia was selected from an ethnobotanical prospection in all regions of Cameroon, and was used to prepare an oral hypoglycemic product. This preparation required 9 steps focused on the characterization of the plant species, and the standardization of the ethnopharmacological preparation by a multidisciplinary team of scientists with expertise in botany, ecology, pharmacognosy and pharmacology. Resultantly, four galenic formulations of hypoglycemic medications were produced. A relationship between these four formulations was described as follow: One spoon of oral suspension (10 ml)=one sachet of powder=2 tablets=3 capsules. Hence, our research provides new insight into a drug discovery approach that could alleviate the major problems affecting traditional medicine and enhance its effectiveness in addressing health care in developing and undeveloped countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus