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A J-shaped relationship between caloric intake and survival in critically ill patients.

Crosara IC, Mélot C, Preiser JC - Ann Intensive Care (2015)

Bottom Line: ICU, hospital and 28-day mortality and the length of stay (LOS) in ICU and in the hospital were compared between each quartile, before and after adjustment in case of differences in baseline characteristics.In this large and heterogeneous cohort of ICU short stayers, a J-shaped relationship between the amount of calories provided and outcome was found.These hypothesis generating findings are consistent with the concept of improved clinical outcome by early energy restriction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Intensive Care, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 808 route de Lennik, 1070, Brussels, Belgium. belcrc@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is much controversy around the optimal caloric intake in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, based on the diverging results of prospective studies. Therefore, we assessed the presence of an association between caloric intake and outcome in a large cohort included in the Glucontrol study.

Methods: Patients (n = 1004) were divided into four quartiles (q1-q4) according to the daily caloric intake (n = 251/quartile). ICU, hospital and 28-day mortality and the length of stay (LOS) in ICU and in the hospital were compared between each quartile, before and after adjustment in case of differences in baseline characteristics.

Results: Caloric intake averaged 0.5 ± 0.6 (q1), 3.0 ± 0.7 (q2), 13.4 ± 5.1 (q3) and 32.4 ± 8.5 (q4) kcal/kg/day (p < 0.001 between quartiles). Comparisons among quartiles revealed that ICU, hospital and 28-day mortality were lower in q2 than in the other quartiles. ICU and hospital LOS were lower in q1 and q2. After adjustment for age, type of admission and severity scores, hospital mortality was lower in q2 than in the other quartiles, and LOS was lower in q1and q2 than in q3-q4.

Conclusions: In this large and heterogeneous cohort of ICU short stayers, a J-shaped relationship between the amount of calories provided and outcome was found. These hypothesis generating findings are consistent with the concept of improved clinical outcome by early energy restriction. Trial registration#: ClinicalTrials.gov# NCT00107601, EUDRA-CT Number: 200400391440.

No MeSH data available.


ICU and hospital length of stay (days) of the four quartiles of caloric intake, before (a, b) and after (c, d) adjustments for between-quartile differences in baseline characteristics (age, type of admission, APACHE II and SOFA scores). The star denotes a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05)
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Fig2: ICU and hospital length of stay (days) of the four quartiles of caloric intake, before (a, b) and after (c, d) adjustments for between-quartile differences in baseline characteristics (age, type of admission, APACHE II and SOFA scores). The star denotes a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05)

Mentions: The global LOS in the ICU and in the hospital of the cohort of patients averaged 6 [3–13] and 16 [11–29] days, respectively. Comparison between quartiles revealed that the unadjusted LOS in the ICU and in the hospital were lower in patients of q1 and q2 than in the q3 and q4 (Fig. 2a, b, p < 0.0001). After adjustment, both LOS in ICU and in the hospital were still lower in the q1 and q2 than in q3 and q4 (p < 0.0001, Fig. 1c, d).Fig. 2


A J-shaped relationship between caloric intake and survival in critically ill patients.

Crosara IC, Mélot C, Preiser JC - Ann Intensive Care (2015)

ICU and hospital length of stay (days) of the four quartiles of caloric intake, before (a, b) and after (c, d) adjustments for between-quartile differences in baseline characteristics (age, type of admission, APACHE II and SOFA scores). The star denotes a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4635112&req=5

Fig2: ICU and hospital length of stay (days) of the four quartiles of caloric intake, before (a, b) and after (c, d) adjustments for between-quartile differences in baseline characteristics (age, type of admission, APACHE II and SOFA scores). The star denotes a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05)
Mentions: The global LOS in the ICU and in the hospital of the cohort of patients averaged 6 [3–13] and 16 [11–29] days, respectively. Comparison between quartiles revealed that the unadjusted LOS in the ICU and in the hospital were lower in patients of q1 and q2 than in the q3 and q4 (Fig. 2a, b, p < 0.0001). After adjustment, both LOS in ICU and in the hospital were still lower in the q1 and q2 than in q3 and q4 (p < 0.0001, Fig. 1c, d).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: ICU, hospital and 28-day mortality and the length of stay (LOS) in ICU and in the hospital were compared between each quartile, before and after adjustment in case of differences in baseline characteristics.In this large and heterogeneous cohort of ICU short stayers, a J-shaped relationship between the amount of calories provided and outcome was found.These hypothesis generating findings are consistent with the concept of improved clinical outcome by early energy restriction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Intensive Care, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 808 route de Lennik, 1070, Brussels, Belgium. belcrc@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is much controversy around the optimal caloric intake in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, based on the diverging results of prospective studies. Therefore, we assessed the presence of an association between caloric intake and outcome in a large cohort included in the Glucontrol study.

Methods: Patients (n = 1004) were divided into four quartiles (q1-q4) according to the daily caloric intake (n = 251/quartile). ICU, hospital and 28-day mortality and the length of stay (LOS) in ICU and in the hospital were compared between each quartile, before and after adjustment in case of differences in baseline characteristics.

Results: Caloric intake averaged 0.5 ± 0.6 (q1), 3.0 ± 0.7 (q2), 13.4 ± 5.1 (q3) and 32.4 ± 8.5 (q4) kcal/kg/day (p < 0.001 between quartiles). Comparisons among quartiles revealed that ICU, hospital and 28-day mortality were lower in q2 than in the other quartiles. ICU and hospital LOS were lower in q1 and q2. After adjustment for age, type of admission and severity scores, hospital mortality was lower in q2 than in the other quartiles, and LOS was lower in q1and q2 than in q3-q4.

Conclusions: In this large and heterogeneous cohort of ICU short stayers, a J-shaped relationship between the amount of calories provided and outcome was found. These hypothesis generating findings are consistent with the concept of improved clinical outcome by early energy restriction. Trial registration#: ClinicalTrials.gov# NCT00107601, EUDRA-CT Number: 200400391440.

No MeSH data available.