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Identification of Putative Olfactory Genes from the Oriental Fruit Moth Grapholita molesta via an Antennal Transcriptome Analysis.

Li G, Du J, Li Y, Wu J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs.OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues.Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Protection Resources and Pest Management (Northwest A&F University), Ministry of Education, Yangling, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, is an extremely important oligophagous pest species of stone and pome fruits throughout the world. As a host-switching species, adult moths, especially females, depend on olfactory cues to a large extent in locating host plants, finding mates, and selecting oviposition sites. The identification of olfactory genes can facilitate investigation on mechanisms for chemical communications.

Methodology/principal finding: We generated transcriptome of female antennae of G.molesta using the next-generation sequencing technique, and assembled transcripts from RNA-seq reads using Trinity, SOAPdenovo-trans and Abyss-trans assemblers. We identified 124 putative olfactory genes. Among the identified olfactory genes, 118 were novel to this species, including 28 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins, 17 chemosensory proteins, 48 odorant receptors, four gustatory receptors, 24 ionotropic receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, and one odor degrading enzyme. The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs. OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues.

Conclusion: Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species. This study provides a foundation for future research on the molecules involved in olfactory recognition of this insect pest, and in particular, the feasibility of using semiochemicals to control this pest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tissue and sex specific expressions of G. molesta OBPs and CSPs.Fa: female antennae, Ma: male antennae, Fb: female boby (without antennae), Mb: male boby (without antennae), NTC: No template control.
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pone.0142193.g010: Tissue and sex specific expressions of G. molesta OBPs and CSPs.Fa: female antennae, Ma: male antennae, Fb: female boby (without antennae), Mb: male boby (without antennae), NTC: No template control.

Mentions: The sex and tissue-specific expression of GmolPBP2 and GmolPBP3 had been studied previously [49]. In this work, the expression patterns of the candidate genes encoding 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs in male antennae, female antennae, and the remaining bodies were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Fig 10). The results indicated that these OBP-encoding genes were expressed exclusively in antennae except for GmolOBP1, GmolOBP2, GmolOBP6, and GmolOBP18. Interestingly, GmolOBP2 was expressed in both female antennae and the remaining body; whereas GmolOBP10 and GmolOBP11 showed an antenna-specific expression in females. In addition to the expression in both male and female antennae, GmolOBP1 was also expressed in the female body. The remaining OBPs were expressed with similar levels in the antennae of both sexes. Compared with OBPs, almost all candidate CSPs were expressed in the antennae and body of both sexes, appearing no significant differences between males and females.


Identification of Putative Olfactory Genes from the Oriental Fruit Moth Grapholita molesta via an Antennal Transcriptome Analysis.

Li G, Du J, Li Y, Wu J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Tissue and sex specific expressions of G. molesta OBPs and CSPs.Fa: female antennae, Ma: male antennae, Fb: female boby (without antennae), Mb: male boby (without antennae), NTC: No template control.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4635014&req=5

pone.0142193.g010: Tissue and sex specific expressions of G. molesta OBPs and CSPs.Fa: female antennae, Ma: male antennae, Fb: female boby (without antennae), Mb: male boby (without antennae), NTC: No template control.
Mentions: The sex and tissue-specific expression of GmolPBP2 and GmolPBP3 had been studied previously [49]. In this work, the expression patterns of the candidate genes encoding 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs in male antennae, female antennae, and the remaining bodies were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Fig 10). The results indicated that these OBP-encoding genes were expressed exclusively in antennae except for GmolOBP1, GmolOBP2, GmolOBP6, and GmolOBP18. Interestingly, GmolOBP2 was expressed in both female antennae and the remaining body; whereas GmolOBP10 and GmolOBP11 showed an antenna-specific expression in females. In addition to the expression in both male and female antennae, GmolOBP1 was also expressed in the female body. The remaining OBPs were expressed with similar levels in the antennae of both sexes. Compared with OBPs, almost all candidate CSPs were expressed in the antennae and body of both sexes, appearing no significant differences between males and females.

Bottom Line: The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs.OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues.Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Protection Resources and Pest Management (Northwest A&F University), Ministry of Education, Yangling, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, is an extremely important oligophagous pest species of stone and pome fruits throughout the world. As a host-switching species, adult moths, especially females, depend on olfactory cues to a large extent in locating host plants, finding mates, and selecting oviposition sites. The identification of olfactory genes can facilitate investigation on mechanisms for chemical communications.

Methodology/principal finding: We generated transcriptome of female antennae of G.molesta using the next-generation sequencing technique, and assembled transcripts from RNA-seq reads using Trinity, SOAPdenovo-trans and Abyss-trans assemblers. We identified 124 putative olfactory genes. Among the identified olfactory genes, 118 were novel to this species, including 28 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins, 17 chemosensory proteins, 48 odorant receptors, four gustatory receptors, 24 ionotropic receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, and one odor degrading enzyme. The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs. OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues.

Conclusion: Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species. This study provides a foundation for future research on the molecules involved in olfactory recognition of this insect pest, and in particular, the feasibility of using semiochemicals to control this pest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus