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A Cross-Sectional Retrospective Analysis of the Racial and Geographic Variations in Cataract Surgery.

Shahbazi S, Studnicki J, Warner-Hillard CW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The statistical results show no overall differences between the disparity ratios and the racial composition of the communities.However, our geospatial analyses revealed a concentration of high racial disparity/high white population counties largely along the West Coast and South Central portion of the state.Geospatial techniques did, however, identify subpopulations of interest which were not otherwise identifiable with typical statistical approaches, nor consistent with their conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Services Research, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cataract surgery is the most common surgery performed on beneficiaries of Medicare, accounting for more than $3.4 billion in annual expenditures. The purpose of this study is to examine racial and geographic variations in cataract surgery rates and determine the association between the racial composition of the community population and the racial disparity in the likelihood of receiving necessary cataract surgery.

Methods: Using the national prevalence rates from the National Institute of Eye Health and the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Florida State Ambulatory Surgery Database, we determined the estimated cases of cataract and the actual number of cataract procedures performed, on four race/gender determined groups aged 65 and over in the state of Florida in 2010. The utilization rates and disparity ratios were also calculated for each Florida county. The counties were segmented into groups based on their racial composition. The association between racial composition and disparity ratios in receiving necessary cataract surgery was examined. The Geographic Information System was used to display county-level geospatial relationships.

Results: African-Americans have a lower gender-specific cataract prevalence (African-American male = 0.246, African-American female = 0.392, white male = 0.368, and white female = 0.457), but they are also less likely than whites to receive necessary cataract surgery (utilization rate: African-American male = 7.92%, African-American female = 6.17%, white male = 12.08%, and white female = 10.54%). The statistical results show no overall differences between the disparity ratios and the racial composition of the communities. However, our geospatial analyses revealed a concentration of high racial disparity/high white population counties largely along the West Coast and South Central portion of the state.

Conclusions: There are racial differences in the likelihood of receiving necessary cataract surgery. However, there is no significant statewide association between the racial composition of the community population and the racial disparity in the likelihood of receiving necessary cataract surgery. Geospatial techniques did, however, identify subpopulations of interest which were not otherwise identifiable with typical statistical approaches, nor consistent with their conclusions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated Cataract Surgery Rates in County Categories based on Percentages of African-American Population in Race/Gender Groups.
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pone.0142459.g001: Estimated Cataract Surgery Rates in County Categories based on Percentages of African-American Population in Race/Gender Groups.

Mentions: In the stratified analysis by racial composition (Fig 1), we found no significant differences in means of disparity ratios for receiving necessary cataract surgery between African-Americans and whites across the racial composition categories, suggesting that utilization of cataract surgery does not change significantly as the African-American population in an area increases. Whites were more likely to receive the necessary cataract surgery regardless of the African-American composition of the community. Our statistical analyses also revealed no statistically significant differences in rate of disparity across the racial composition categories (F = 1.51, P-value = 0.2103).


A Cross-Sectional Retrospective Analysis of the Racial and Geographic Variations in Cataract Surgery.

Shahbazi S, Studnicki J, Warner-Hillard CW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Estimated Cataract Surgery Rates in County Categories based on Percentages of African-American Population in Race/Gender Groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4635007&req=5

pone.0142459.g001: Estimated Cataract Surgery Rates in County Categories based on Percentages of African-American Population in Race/Gender Groups.
Mentions: In the stratified analysis by racial composition (Fig 1), we found no significant differences in means of disparity ratios for receiving necessary cataract surgery between African-Americans and whites across the racial composition categories, suggesting that utilization of cataract surgery does not change significantly as the African-American population in an area increases. Whites were more likely to receive the necessary cataract surgery regardless of the African-American composition of the community. Our statistical analyses also revealed no statistically significant differences in rate of disparity across the racial composition categories (F = 1.51, P-value = 0.2103).

Bottom Line: The statistical results show no overall differences between the disparity ratios and the racial composition of the communities.However, our geospatial analyses revealed a concentration of high racial disparity/high white population counties largely along the West Coast and South Central portion of the state.Geospatial techniques did, however, identify subpopulations of interest which were not otherwise identifiable with typical statistical approaches, nor consistent with their conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Services Research, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cataract surgery is the most common surgery performed on beneficiaries of Medicare, accounting for more than $3.4 billion in annual expenditures. The purpose of this study is to examine racial and geographic variations in cataract surgery rates and determine the association between the racial composition of the community population and the racial disparity in the likelihood of receiving necessary cataract surgery.

Methods: Using the national prevalence rates from the National Institute of Eye Health and the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Florida State Ambulatory Surgery Database, we determined the estimated cases of cataract and the actual number of cataract procedures performed, on four race/gender determined groups aged 65 and over in the state of Florida in 2010. The utilization rates and disparity ratios were also calculated for each Florida county. The counties were segmented into groups based on their racial composition. The association between racial composition and disparity ratios in receiving necessary cataract surgery was examined. The Geographic Information System was used to display county-level geospatial relationships.

Results: African-Americans have a lower gender-specific cataract prevalence (African-American male = 0.246, African-American female = 0.392, white male = 0.368, and white female = 0.457), but they are also less likely than whites to receive necessary cataract surgery (utilization rate: African-American male = 7.92%, African-American female = 6.17%, white male = 12.08%, and white female = 10.54%). The statistical results show no overall differences between the disparity ratios and the racial composition of the communities. However, our geospatial analyses revealed a concentration of high racial disparity/high white population counties largely along the West Coast and South Central portion of the state.

Conclusions: There are racial differences in the likelihood of receiving necessary cataract surgery. However, there is no significant statewide association between the racial composition of the community population and the racial disparity in the likelihood of receiving necessary cataract surgery. Geospatial techniques did, however, identify subpopulations of interest which were not otherwise identifiable with typical statistical approaches, nor consistent with their conclusions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus