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Detection of a novel astrovirus from a black-naped monarch (Hypothymis azurea) in Cambodia.

Mendenhall IH, Yaung KN, Joyner PH, Keatts L, Borthwick S, Neves ES, San S, Gilbert M, Smith GJ - Virol. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Outcomes result in a spectrum of disease, ranging from asymptomatic shedding to gastroenteritis with diarrhea, stunting, failure to thrive and death.This is the first astrovirus detection in a passerine bird.Phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide distances suggest that this avastrovirus forms a distinct lineage and may constitute a fourth avastrovirus group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8 College Rd, Singapore, 169857, Singapore. ian.mendenhall@duke-nus.edu.sg.

ABSTRACT

Background: Astroviruses are comprised of two genera with Avastrovirus infecting birds and Mamastrovirus infecting mammals. Avastroviruses have primarily been associated with infections of poultry, especially chicken, turkey, duck, and guineafowl production systems, but also infect wading birds and doves. Outcomes result in a spectrum of disease, ranging from asymptomatic shedding to gastroenteritis with diarrhea, stunting, failure to thrive and death.

Findings: Virological surveillance was conducted in birds from two sites in Cambodia in 2010. Samples were screened for influenza, astroviruses, coronaviruses, flaviviruses, and paramyxoviruses. A total of 199 birds were tested and an astrovirus was detected in a black-naped monarch (Hypothymis azurea).

Conclusions: This is the first astrovirus detection in a passerine bird. Phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide distances suggest that this avastrovirus forms a distinct lineage and may constitute a fourth avastrovirus group.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

This tree represents a phylogenetic analysis on the RNA dependent reverse polymerase using Mr. Bayes and PHYML in Geneious 7.1.6. Posterior probability values (>95 %) from Mr. Bayes are above the nodes and Maximum Likelihood bootstrap values (>70 %) are labeled below the nodes. Sequences from this study are in red text. The sequences are labeled with the common name/sample identification/two letter country code/year collected (GenBank Accession). A list of all sequences is in the supplementary data
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Fig1: This tree represents a phylogenetic analysis on the RNA dependent reverse polymerase using Mr. Bayes and PHYML in Geneious 7.1.6. Posterior probability values (>95 %) from Mr. Bayes are above the nodes and Maximum Likelihood bootstrap values (>70 %) are labeled below the nodes. Sequences from this study are in red text. The sequences are labeled with the common name/sample identification/two letter country code/year collected (GenBank Accession). A list of all sequences is in the supplementary data

Mentions: Both the ML and Bayesian analysis of the RdRp gene showed the same basic tree topology as Chu et al. [3] with the exception that the passerine astrovirus formed a divergent group that falls in a basal position to both avastrovirus groups 1 and 2 (Fig. 1). Groups 1 and 2 are strongly supported as sister groups to each other and are in turn most closely related to the black-naped monarch virus sequences. Group 3 avastroviruses are comprised entirely of ducks and supported as a sister clade to all other avastroviruses. Phylogenetic reconstruction and the pairwise distance analysis both indicate that the passerine avastrovirus forms a novel lineage that is well differentiated from all previously described avastroviruses.Fig. 1


Detection of a novel astrovirus from a black-naped monarch (Hypothymis azurea) in Cambodia.

Mendenhall IH, Yaung KN, Joyner PH, Keatts L, Borthwick S, Neves ES, San S, Gilbert M, Smith GJ - Virol. J. (2015)

This tree represents a phylogenetic analysis on the RNA dependent reverse polymerase using Mr. Bayes and PHYML in Geneious 7.1.6. Posterior probability values (>95 %) from Mr. Bayes are above the nodes and Maximum Likelihood bootstrap values (>70 %) are labeled below the nodes. Sequences from this study are in red text. The sequences are labeled with the common name/sample identification/two letter country code/year collected (GenBank Accession). A list of all sequences is in the supplementary data
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4634723&req=5

Fig1: This tree represents a phylogenetic analysis on the RNA dependent reverse polymerase using Mr. Bayes and PHYML in Geneious 7.1.6. Posterior probability values (>95 %) from Mr. Bayes are above the nodes and Maximum Likelihood bootstrap values (>70 %) are labeled below the nodes. Sequences from this study are in red text. The sequences are labeled with the common name/sample identification/two letter country code/year collected (GenBank Accession). A list of all sequences is in the supplementary data
Mentions: Both the ML and Bayesian analysis of the RdRp gene showed the same basic tree topology as Chu et al. [3] with the exception that the passerine astrovirus formed a divergent group that falls in a basal position to both avastrovirus groups 1 and 2 (Fig. 1). Groups 1 and 2 are strongly supported as sister groups to each other and are in turn most closely related to the black-naped monarch virus sequences. Group 3 avastroviruses are comprised entirely of ducks and supported as a sister clade to all other avastroviruses. Phylogenetic reconstruction and the pairwise distance analysis both indicate that the passerine avastrovirus forms a novel lineage that is well differentiated from all previously described avastroviruses.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Outcomes result in a spectrum of disease, ranging from asymptomatic shedding to gastroenteritis with diarrhea, stunting, failure to thrive and death.This is the first astrovirus detection in a passerine bird.Phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide distances suggest that this avastrovirus forms a distinct lineage and may constitute a fourth avastrovirus group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8 College Rd, Singapore, 169857, Singapore. ian.mendenhall@duke-nus.edu.sg.

ABSTRACT

Background: Astroviruses are comprised of two genera with Avastrovirus infecting birds and Mamastrovirus infecting mammals. Avastroviruses have primarily been associated with infections of poultry, especially chicken, turkey, duck, and guineafowl production systems, but also infect wading birds and doves. Outcomes result in a spectrum of disease, ranging from asymptomatic shedding to gastroenteritis with diarrhea, stunting, failure to thrive and death.

Findings: Virological surveillance was conducted in birds from two sites in Cambodia in 2010. Samples were screened for influenza, astroviruses, coronaviruses, flaviviruses, and paramyxoviruses. A total of 199 birds were tested and an astrovirus was detected in a black-naped monarch (Hypothymis azurea).

Conclusions: This is the first astrovirus detection in a passerine bird. Phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide distances suggest that this avastrovirus forms a distinct lineage and may constitute a fourth avastrovirus group.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus