Limits...
Metabolomic, enzymatic, and histochemical analyzes of cassava roots during postharvest physiological deterioration.

Uarrota VG, Maraschin M - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: Under postharvest physiological deterioration cassava root tubers alter the expression of biosynthetic pathways of certain primary and secondary metabolites, as well as the activity of some scavenging enzymes.The results corroborate the working hypothesis, revealing that high Levels of phenolic acids, scopoletin, carotenoids, proteins, and augmented activities of guaiacol peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in non-stored cassava roots can be used as potential biomarkers of cassava deterioration.Cassava physiological deterioration depends on cultivar and many compounds are up and downregulated during storage time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Biotechnology and Biosciences, Plant Morphogenesis and Biochemistry Laboratory, Biological Science Center, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Rodovia Admar Gonzaga 1346, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, CEP 88.034-000, Brazil. uaceleste@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Under postharvest physiological deterioration cassava root tubers alter the expression of biosynthetic pathways of certain primary and secondary metabolites, as well as the activity of some scavenging enzymes. Therefore, in this study we hypothesized that cassava cultivars differ as to their physiological responses to deterioration and their biochemical profiles can be an indicative of the tolerance or susceptibility to deterioration.

Results: The results corroborate the working hypothesis, revealing that high Levels of phenolic acids, scopoletin, carotenoids, proteins, and augmented activities of guaiacol peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in non-stored cassava roots can be used as potential biomarkers of cassava deterioration.

Conclusions: Cassava physiological deterioration depends on cultivar and many compounds are up and downregulated during storage time. Secondary metabolites, enzymes, scopoletin, scavenging reactive oxygen species, and acidic polysaccharides are activated as responses to the physiological stress induced in root tubers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Decision regression trees showing the main compounds (predictors) related to PPD in cassava cultivars. Data were organized in small subsets to find the best model to predict PPD (a secondary metabolites, b cyanogenic glucosides, c enzymes, d sugars and organic acids, e reactive oxygen species and f all dataset containing 29 variables)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4634721&req=5

Fig3: Decision regression trees showing the main compounds (predictors) related to PPD in cassava cultivars. Data were organized in small subsets to find the best model to predict PPD (a secondary metabolites, b cyanogenic glucosides, c enzymes, d sugars and organic acids, e reactive oxygen species and f all dataset containing 29 variables)

Mentions: Total secondary metabolites (phenolics, flavonoids, carotenoids, and anthocyanins), cyanogenic glucosides (total cyanide, acetone cyanohydrin, linamarin, and linamarase), ROS (hydrogen peroxide), ROS-scavenging enzymes (CAT, total SOD, MnSOD, CuZnSOD, APX, GPX, PPO, Proteins), non-enzymatic antioxidants (AsA, α-TOC), soluble sugars, organic acids, and hydroxycoumarins (scopoletin) evaluated during storage time of cassava roots are summarized in Figs. 1, 2 and Table 1. Figure 3a–f shows the decision tree models with the main compounds related to PPD in cassava cultivars and Fig. 4 (left) summarizes the images derived from PPD induction of cassava roots (non-stored samples and those stored until 11 days) and histochemical analysis of samples stained with ATO, PAS and CBB. Figure 4 (right) represent the results of PPD scoring of cassava roots during the storage time (3, 5, 8, and 11 days). PPD rate increases during the storage time in all cultivars. Table 2 shows the results of ordinary least square (OLS) regression models of all data and subsets (secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glucosides, enzymes, sugar + organic acids, and ROS-scavenging enzymes).Fig. 1


Metabolomic, enzymatic, and histochemical analyzes of cassava roots during postharvest physiological deterioration.

Uarrota VG, Maraschin M - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Decision regression trees showing the main compounds (predictors) related to PPD in cassava cultivars. Data were organized in small subsets to find the best model to predict PPD (a secondary metabolites, b cyanogenic glucosides, c enzymes, d sugars and organic acids, e reactive oxygen species and f all dataset containing 29 variables)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4634721&req=5

Fig3: Decision regression trees showing the main compounds (predictors) related to PPD in cassava cultivars. Data were organized in small subsets to find the best model to predict PPD (a secondary metabolites, b cyanogenic glucosides, c enzymes, d sugars and organic acids, e reactive oxygen species and f all dataset containing 29 variables)
Mentions: Total secondary metabolites (phenolics, flavonoids, carotenoids, and anthocyanins), cyanogenic glucosides (total cyanide, acetone cyanohydrin, linamarin, and linamarase), ROS (hydrogen peroxide), ROS-scavenging enzymes (CAT, total SOD, MnSOD, CuZnSOD, APX, GPX, PPO, Proteins), non-enzymatic antioxidants (AsA, α-TOC), soluble sugars, organic acids, and hydroxycoumarins (scopoletin) evaluated during storage time of cassava roots are summarized in Figs. 1, 2 and Table 1. Figure 3a–f shows the decision tree models with the main compounds related to PPD in cassava cultivars and Fig. 4 (left) summarizes the images derived from PPD induction of cassava roots (non-stored samples and those stored until 11 days) and histochemical analysis of samples stained with ATO, PAS and CBB. Figure 4 (right) represent the results of PPD scoring of cassava roots during the storage time (3, 5, 8, and 11 days). PPD rate increases during the storage time in all cultivars. Table 2 shows the results of ordinary least square (OLS) regression models of all data and subsets (secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glucosides, enzymes, sugar + organic acids, and ROS-scavenging enzymes).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Under postharvest physiological deterioration cassava root tubers alter the expression of biosynthetic pathways of certain primary and secondary metabolites, as well as the activity of some scavenging enzymes.The results corroborate the working hypothesis, revealing that high Levels of phenolic acids, scopoletin, carotenoids, proteins, and augmented activities of guaiacol peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in non-stored cassava roots can be used as potential biomarkers of cassava deterioration.Cassava physiological deterioration depends on cultivar and many compounds are up and downregulated during storage time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Biotechnology and Biosciences, Plant Morphogenesis and Biochemistry Laboratory, Biological Science Center, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Rodovia Admar Gonzaga 1346, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, CEP 88.034-000, Brazil. uaceleste@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Under postharvest physiological deterioration cassava root tubers alter the expression of biosynthetic pathways of certain primary and secondary metabolites, as well as the activity of some scavenging enzymes. Therefore, in this study we hypothesized that cassava cultivars differ as to their physiological responses to deterioration and their biochemical profiles can be an indicative of the tolerance or susceptibility to deterioration.

Results: The results corroborate the working hypothesis, revealing that high Levels of phenolic acids, scopoletin, carotenoids, proteins, and augmented activities of guaiacol peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in non-stored cassava roots can be used as potential biomarkers of cassava deterioration.

Conclusions: Cassava physiological deterioration depends on cultivar and many compounds are up and downregulated during storage time. Secondary metabolites, enzymes, scopoletin, scavenging reactive oxygen species, and acidic polysaccharides are activated as responses to the physiological stress induced in root tubers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus