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Impalement injury by glass shard with delayed colonic perforation.

Rosat A, Sánchez JM, Chocarro C, Barrera M - Pan Afr Med J (2015)

Bottom Line: Fourteen months after the injury, he developed progressive abdominal pain.It was extracted and the perforation closed with a lineal stapler.There was no need of bowel resection and the patient was discharged home nine days after the intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Ctra Del Rosario 145, 38010 Sta Cruz de Tenerife, Spain.

ABSTRACT
A 66-year-old man experienced a traumatic injury after a fall on top of a glass tea table, which caused some superficial lacerations all around the body. He was examined in the emergency room by a physician. The physician could not feel any foreign body upon wound exploration and sutured the laceration. Fourteen months after the injury, he developed progressive abdominal pain. On emergency room and abdominal x-ray showed a foreign body, which a CT scan revealed as an intraabdominal glass shard. The glass presumably impaled his abdominal wall as a result of his previous traumatic injury. The patient underwent laparotomy, which revealed a large glass (16x1cm) perforating the transverse colon. It was extracted and the perforation closed with a lineal stapler. There was no need of bowel resection and the patient was discharged home nine days after the intervention.

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(A) abdominal CT scan: posterior end of the shard next to the spleen; (B) arrow points at the retroperitoneum scar, where the glass shard impaled the patient
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Figure 0002: (A) abdominal CT scan: posterior end of the shard next to the spleen; (B) arrow points at the retroperitoneum scar, where the glass shard impaled the patient

Mentions: Fourteen months later, he developed progressive pain on left abdominal wall. The physical examination showed an old scar on the left back and a protrusion on the left hypocondrium. Blood tests were unremarkable. A lateral abdominal x-ray revealed an image that made us suspect of a possible glass shard as cause of the pain (Figure 1 B). A CT scan was made and a very large glass shard was found inside the colon, just next to the pancreas, the left kidney and the spleen (Figure 2). Surprisingly, due to the location of the glass shard in the transverse colon, the patient did not have any obstructive symptoms probably further delaying his presentation. Preoperative broad-spectrum antibiotics along with tetanus immunoglobulin and tetanus toxoid were administered.


Impalement injury by glass shard with delayed colonic perforation.

Rosat A, Sánchez JM, Chocarro C, Barrera M - Pan Afr Med J (2015)

(A) abdominal CT scan: posterior end of the shard next to the spleen; (B) arrow points at the retroperitoneum scar, where the glass shard impaled the patient
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633741&req=5

Figure 0002: (A) abdominal CT scan: posterior end of the shard next to the spleen; (B) arrow points at the retroperitoneum scar, where the glass shard impaled the patient
Mentions: Fourteen months later, he developed progressive pain on left abdominal wall. The physical examination showed an old scar on the left back and a protrusion on the left hypocondrium. Blood tests were unremarkable. A lateral abdominal x-ray revealed an image that made us suspect of a possible glass shard as cause of the pain (Figure 1 B). A CT scan was made and a very large glass shard was found inside the colon, just next to the pancreas, the left kidney and the spleen (Figure 2). Surprisingly, due to the location of the glass shard in the transverse colon, the patient did not have any obstructive symptoms probably further delaying his presentation. Preoperative broad-spectrum antibiotics along with tetanus immunoglobulin and tetanus toxoid were administered.

Bottom Line: Fourteen months after the injury, he developed progressive abdominal pain.It was extracted and the perforation closed with a lineal stapler.There was no need of bowel resection and the patient was discharged home nine days after the intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Ctra Del Rosario 145, 38010 Sta Cruz de Tenerife, Spain.

ABSTRACT
A 66-year-old man experienced a traumatic injury after a fall on top of a glass tea table, which caused some superficial lacerations all around the body. He was examined in the emergency room by a physician. The physician could not feel any foreign body upon wound exploration and sutured the laceration. Fourteen months after the injury, he developed progressive abdominal pain. On emergency room and abdominal x-ray showed a foreign body, which a CT scan revealed as an intraabdominal glass shard. The glass presumably impaled his abdominal wall as a result of his previous traumatic injury. The patient underwent laparotomy, which revealed a large glass (16x1cm) perforating the transverse colon. It was extracted and the perforation closed with a lineal stapler. There was no need of bowel resection and the patient was discharged home nine days after the intervention.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus