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Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

Qhanya LB, Matowane G, Chen W, Sun Y, Letsimo EM, Parvez M, Yu JH, Mashele SS, Syed K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes.The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina.The present study initiates our understanding of P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit for Drug Discovery Research, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein 9300, Free State, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host/ecological niche can influence shaping the P450 content of an organism. The present study initiates our understanding of P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Family level comparative analysis of putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenases between fungal orders represented by A. mellea (Agaricomycotina), P. graminis, M. laricis-populina, M. lini and M. osmundae (Pucciniomycotina) and U. maydis, S. reilianum and T. anomala (Ustilaginomycotina).The number in parenthesis indicates P450 family numbers. The number in parenthesis next to each species indicates the total P450 count in the particular species.
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pone.0142100.g002: Family level comparative analysis of putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenases between fungal orders represented by A. mellea (Agaricomycotina), P. graminis, M. laricis-populina, M. lini and M. osmundae (Pucciniomycotina) and U. maydis, S. reilianum and T. anomala (Ustilaginomycotina).The number in parenthesis indicates P450 family numbers. The number in parenthesis next to each species indicates the total P450 count in the particular species.

Mentions: Comparison of P450 families between basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 families in these species, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order (Fig 2). As shown in Fig 3, only three P450 families, CYP51, CYP53 and CYP61, are conserved across biotrophic plant pathogens. These P450 families are known to be highly conserved in fungi. A. mellea shares a single P450 family (CYP5139) with biotrophs belonging to Pucciniomycotina and two P450 families (CYP505 and CYP5027) with biotrophs belong to Ustilaginomycotina. Interestingly, the CYP61 family that is conserved across fungi [16, 17] is missing from P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. In a previous study the absence of this P450 family was observed in these organisms [17]. A. mellea belonging to the Agaricomycotina contains 24 unique P450 families, whereas 21 unique P450 families were found in the Pucciniomycotina species used in this study. Ustilaginomycotina species contain 19 unique P450 families (Fig 2). This clearly suggests that basidiomycete biotrophs belonging to different orders harbour unique P450 families in their genomes.


Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

Qhanya LB, Matowane G, Chen W, Sun Y, Letsimo EM, Parvez M, Yu JH, Mashele SS, Syed K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Family level comparative analysis of putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenases between fungal orders represented by A. mellea (Agaricomycotina), P. graminis, M. laricis-populina, M. lini and M. osmundae (Pucciniomycotina) and U. maydis, S. reilianum and T. anomala (Ustilaginomycotina).The number in parenthesis indicates P450 family numbers. The number in parenthesis next to each species indicates the total P450 count in the particular species.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633277&req=5

pone.0142100.g002: Family level comparative analysis of putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenases between fungal orders represented by A. mellea (Agaricomycotina), P. graminis, M. laricis-populina, M. lini and M. osmundae (Pucciniomycotina) and U. maydis, S. reilianum and T. anomala (Ustilaginomycotina).The number in parenthesis indicates P450 family numbers. The number in parenthesis next to each species indicates the total P450 count in the particular species.
Mentions: Comparison of P450 families between basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 families in these species, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order (Fig 2). As shown in Fig 3, only three P450 families, CYP51, CYP53 and CYP61, are conserved across biotrophic plant pathogens. These P450 families are known to be highly conserved in fungi. A. mellea shares a single P450 family (CYP5139) with biotrophs belonging to Pucciniomycotina and two P450 families (CYP505 and CYP5027) with biotrophs belong to Ustilaginomycotina. Interestingly, the CYP61 family that is conserved across fungi [16, 17] is missing from P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. In a previous study the absence of this P450 family was observed in these organisms [17]. A. mellea belonging to the Agaricomycotina contains 24 unique P450 families, whereas 21 unique P450 families were found in the Pucciniomycotina species used in this study. Ustilaginomycotina species contain 19 unique P450 families (Fig 2). This clearly suggests that basidiomycete biotrophs belonging to different orders harbour unique P450 families in their genomes.

Bottom Line: This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes.The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina.The present study initiates our understanding of P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit for Drug Discovery Research, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein 9300, Free State, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host/ecological niche can influence shaping the P450 content of an organism. The present study initiates our understanding of P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens.

No MeSH data available.