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Attack Coverage in High-Level Men's Volleyball: Organization on the Edge of Chaos?

Laporta L, Nikolaidis P, Thomas L, Afonso J - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: These structures lacked significant associations with the game complex, setting zone, and effect of attack coverage.Conversely, attack coverage structures showed significant associations with the attack zone and tempo, with very strong effect sizes (V=0.472 and V=0.521, respectively).As certain attack zones are deeply associated with attack tempo, it is apparent that quicker attack plays affect attack coverage structuring, promoting the formation of less complex structures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Porto, Faculty of Sport (Portugal).

ABSTRACT
Change is pervasive, but emerging patterns are occasionally detectable through analysis of systemic behaviors. Match analysis uses these patterns in order to reduce the degree of improvisation and to optimize the training process. However, it is possible that certain game phases elude systematic patterning. In this vein, our aim was to analyze the case of attack coverage in men's volleyball, as we suspected it would elude systematic patterning and has received negligible attention in scientific research. We analyzed the occurrence of attack coverage in 4544 plays of the 2011 Volleyball World League. A Chi-square test with residual adjusted values was applied to explore significant associations between variables. A Monte Carlo correction was applied, as some cells had n<5. Effect sizes were determined using Cramer's V. Overall, attack coverage occurred in 3.89% of ball possessions, and 23 distinct structures emerged. These structures lacked significant associations with the game complex, setting zone, and effect of attack coverage. Conversely, attack coverage structures showed significant associations with the attack zone and tempo, with very strong effect sizes (V=0.472 and V=0.521, respectively). As certain attack zones are deeply associated with attack tempo, it is apparent that quicker attack plays affect attack coverage structuring, promoting the formation of less complex structures. Ultimately, attack coverage structures seem to depend on momentary constraints, thereby rendering rigid systematization impracticable. Still, we contended that a principle-based approach might be suitable. This invites researchers to rethink how to interpret game regularities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of attack coverage systems described in the literature. Examples of 3:2 and 2:3 attack coverage upon attack in zone 4.
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f1-jhk-47-249: Examples of attack coverage systems described in the literature. Examples of 3:2 and 2:3 attack coverage upon attack in zone 4.

Mentions: The KIV is characterized by restructuring of the offensive phase after recovering a ball deflected by the block and returning to the attacker’s team (Hileno and Buscà, 2012; Monge, 2003). To the best of our knowledge, only two scientific papers have been published on this topic (Hileno and Buscà, 2012, Laporta et al., 2015), despite being considered a legitimate and relevant game complex. Technical and/or pedagogical books on the topic are outdated, mostly recognizing the existence of only two major attack coverage systems: one with a first defensive line formed by two players and a second line formed by three players (2:3), and another with an inversion of the two lines (3:2) (Asher, 1998; Nicholls, 1973; Selinger and Ackermann-Blount, 1986) (Figure 1). Such simplistic and stereotyped systems seem disengaged from the current complexity of attack models in high-level volleyball, which are increasingly fast and complex (Afonso et al., 2008; Afonso et al., 2005; Castro and Mesquita, 2008; Ciuffarella et al., 2013; Costa et al., 2012), and can exert a major influence on the possible structures during KIV (Hileno and Buscà, 2012).


Attack Coverage in High-Level Men's Volleyball: Organization on the Edge of Chaos?

Laporta L, Nikolaidis P, Thomas L, Afonso J - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Examples of attack coverage systems described in the literature. Examples of 3:2 and 2:3 attack coverage upon attack in zone 4.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633260&req=5

f1-jhk-47-249: Examples of attack coverage systems described in the literature. Examples of 3:2 and 2:3 attack coverage upon attack in zone 4.
Mentions: The KIV is characterized by restructuring of the offensive phase after recovering a ball deflected by the block and returning to the attacker’s team (Hileno and Buscà, 2012; Monge, 2003). To the best of our knowledge, only two scientific papers have been published on this topic (Hileno and Buscà, 2012, Laporta et al., 2015), despite being considered a legitimate and relevant game complex. Technical and/or pedagogical books on the topic are outdated, mostly recognizing the existence of only two major attack coverage systems: one with a first defensive line formed by two players and a second line formed by three players (2:3), and another with an inversion of the two lines (3:2) (Asher, 1998; Nicholls, 1973; Selinger and Ackermann-Blount, 1986) (Figure 1). Such simplistic and stereotyped systems seem disengaged from the current complexity of attack models in high-level volleyball, which are increasingly fast and complex (Afonso et al., 2008; Afonso et al., 2005; Castro and Mesquita, 2008; Ciuffarella et al., 2013; Costa et al., 2012), and can exert a major influence on the possible structures during KIV (Hileno and Buscà, 2012).

Bottom Line: These structures lacked significant associations with the game complex, setting zone, and effect of attack coverage.Conversely, attack coverage structures showed significant associations with the attack zone and tempo, with very strong effect sizes (V=0.472 and V=0.521, respectively).As certain attack zones are deeply associated with attack tempo, it is apparent that quicker attack plays affect attack coverage structuring, promoting the formation of less complex structures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Porto, Faculty of Sport (Portugal).

ABSTRACT
Change is pervasive, but emerging patterns are occasionally detectable through analysis of systemic behaviors. Match analysis uses these patterns in order to reduce the degree of improvisation and to optimize the training process. However, it is possible that certain game phases elude systematic patterning. In this vein, our aim was to analyze the case of attack coverage in men's volleyball, as we suspected it would elude systematic patterning and has received negligible attention in scientific research. We analyzed the occurrence of attack coverage in 4544 plays of the 2011 Volleyball World League. A Chi-square test with residual adjusted values was applied to explore significant associations between variables. A Monte Carlo correction was applied, as some cells had n<5. Effect sizes were determined using Cramer's V. Overall, attack coverage occurred in 3.89% of ball possessions, and 23 distinct structures emerged. These structures lacked significant associations with the game complex, setting zone, and effect of attack coverage. Conversely, attack coverage structures showed significant associations with the attack zone and tempo, with very strong effect sizes (V=0.472 and V=0.521, respectively). As certain attack zones are deeply associated with attack tempo, it is apparent that quicker attack plays affect attack coverage structuring, promoting the formation of less complex structures. Ultimately, attack coverage structures seem to depend on momentary constraints, thereby rendering rigid systematization impracticable. Still, we contended that a principle-based approach might be suitable. This invites researchers to rethink how to interpret game regularities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus