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Relative Age Effect in UEFA Championship Soccer Players.

González-Víllora S, Pastor-Vicedo JC, Cordente D - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: In the past 20 years the existence of this effect has been shown with higher or smaller impact in multiple sports, including soccer.The results obtained by the square test ( the Kruskal-Wallis test and Cohen's effect sizes revealed the existence of RAE (χ(2) = 17.829, p < 0.001; d = 0.30), with the size of their different effects depending on their category or qualifying round achieved by the national team and the existence of significance in the observed differences by category.RAE was not evident in the professional teams analysed, however it was present in the three lower categories analysed (youth categories), with its influence being greater on younger age categories (U-17).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Teaching Education (Cuenca), University of Castilla-la Mancha, Spain. EDAF research group.

ABSTRACT
Relative Age Effect (RAE) is the breakdown by both age grouping and dates of birth of athletes. In the past 20 years the existence of this effect has been shown with higher or smaller impact in multiple sports, including soccer. The purpose of this study was to identify the existence of RAE in European soccer players. The sample included 841 elite soccer players who were participants in the UEFA European Soccer Championship in different categories. The professional category (n = 368), U-19 (n = 144) and U-17 (n = 145) were in 2012, and U-21 was in 2011 (n = 184). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Levene test recommended the use of nonparametric statistics. The results obtained by the square test ( the Kruskal-Wallis test and Cohen's effect sizes revealed the existence of RAE (χ(2) = 17.829, p < 0.001; d = 0.30), with the size of their different effects depending on their category or qualifying round achieved by the national team and the existence of significance in the observed differences by category. Therefore, we could continue examining RAE which is present in elite soccer, and could be considered a factor that influences performance of the national teams tested. RAE was not evident in the professional teams analysed, however it was present in the three lower categories analysed (youth categories), with its influence being greater on younger age categories (U-17).

No MeSH data available.


Distribution of soccer players per semester differentiated by selection and qualifying round reached S: Semifinal; F: Final; W: Winner.
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f3-jhk-47-237: Distribution of soccer players per semester differentiated by selection and qualifying round reached S: Semifinal; F: Final; W: Winner.

Mentions: The most interesting aspect is reflected in the calculation of effect size. Consequently, with the intention to supplement data showed in Table 2, Figures 2 and 3 were drawn. It is thus evident that there is still a clear preference for players born in the first six months of the year, and that this preference is greater as the category diminishes, as reflected in Figure 2 and its trend lines (S1 and S2). However, according to the results reported in Table 2, it should be noted that in the professional category no RAE is observed, whereas in the U-19 category RAE is observed in the final match with a high effect. In this sense, the presence of RAE in the categories U-21 and U-17 is more evident. In fact, it can be seen how the presence of this effect is significant in both qualifying playoffs considered, being high in the semifinals and average in the final match. In addition, it can also be observed how this effect size appears to be much higher in the semifinal of the U-17 category compared to the U-21 category.


Relative Age Effect in UEFA Championship Soccer Players.

González-Víllora S, Pastor-Vicedo JC, Cordente D - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Distribution of soccer players per semester differentiated by selection and qualifying round reached S: Semifinal; F: Final; W: Winner.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633259&req=5

f3-jhk-47-237: Distribution of soccer players per semester differentiated by selection and qualifying round reached S: Semifinal; F: Final; W: Winner.
Mentions: The most interesting aspect is reflected in the calculation of effect size. Consequently, with the intention to supplement data showed in Table 2, Figures 2 and 3 were drawn. It is thus evident that there is still a clear preference for players born in the first six months of the year, and that this preference is greater as the category diminishes, as reflected in Figure 2 and its trend lines (S1 and S2). However, according to the results reported in Table 2, it should be noted that in the professional category no RAE is observed, whereas in the U-19 category RAE is observed in the final match with a high effect. In this sense, the presence of RAE in the categories U-21 and U-17 is more evident. In fact, it can be seen how the presence of this effect is significant in both qualifying playoffs considered, being high in the semifinals and average in the final match. In addition, it can also be observed how this effect size appears to be much higher in the semifinal of the U-17 category compared to the U-21 category.

Bottom Line: In the past 20 years the existence of this effect has been shown with higher or smaller impact in multiple sports, including soccer.The results obtained by the square test ( the Kruskal-Wallis test and Cohen's effect sizes revealed the existence of RAE (χ(2) = 17.829, p < 0.001; d = 0.30), with the size of their different effects depending on their category or qualifying round achieved by the national team and the existence of significance in the observed differences by category.RAE was not evident in the professional teams analysed, however it was present in the three lower categories analysed (youth categories), with its influence being greater on younger age categories (U-17).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Teaching Education (Cuenca), University of Castilla-la Mancha, Spain. EDAF research group.

ABSTRACT
Relative Age Effect (RAE) is the breakdown by both age grouping and dates of birth of athletes. In the past 20 years the existence of this effect has been shown with higher or smaller impact in multiple sports, including soccer. The purpose of this study was to identify the existence of RAE in European soccer players. The sample included 841 elite soccer players who were participants in the UEFA European Soccer Championship in different categories. The professional category (n = 368), U-19 (n = 144) and U-17 (n = 145) were in 2012, and U-21 was in 2011 (n = 184). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Levene test recommended the use of nonparametric statistics. The results obtained by the square test ( the Kruskal-Wallis test and Cohen's effect sizes revealed the existence of RAE (χ(2) = 17.829, p < 0.001; d = 0.30), with the size of their different effects depending on their category or qualifying round achieved by the national team and the existence of significance in the observed differences by category. Therefore, we could continue examining RAE which is present in elite soccer, and could be considered a factor that influences performance of the national teams tested. RAE was not evident in the professional teams analysed, however it was present in the three lower categories analysed (youth categories), with its influence being greater on younger age categories (U-17).

No MeSH data available.