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Direct and Conceptual Replications of Burgmer & Englich (2012): Power May Have Little to No Effect on Motor Performance.

Cusack M, Vezenkova N, Gottschalk C, Calin-Jageman RJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall, we found little to no effect of power on motor skill (d = 0.09, 95% CI[-0.07, 0.22], n = 603).None of these secondary analyses revealed a strong effect of power on performance.Unfortunately, the pattern of performance changes we observed was unrelated to group differences in perceived and rated power, suggesting that what motor effects do occur with this protocol may not be directly related to the construct of power. [Burgmer, P., &Englich, B. (2012).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Dominican University, River Forest, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Burgmer and Englich (2012) have reported that manipulating feelings of power can substantially improve performance on two motor tasks: golf and darts. We conducted two high-powered direct replications of the effects of power on golf, two online conceptual replications using mirror-tracing as a performance measure, and an additional conceptual replication using a cognitive performance measure (word-search). Overall, we found little to no effect of power on motor skill (d = 0.09, 95% CI[-0.07, 0.22], n = 603). We varied task difficulty, re-analyzed data without participants showing weak responses on manipulation checks, and tried adjusting performance scores for age, gender, and initial task skill. None of these secondary analyses revealed a strong effect of power on performance. A meta-analysis integrating our data with Burgmer & Englich leaves open the possibility that manipulating power could provide a modest boost in motor skill (d = 0.19, 95% CI [0.001, 0.38], n = 685). Unfortunately, the pattern of performance changes we observed was unrelated to group differences in perceived and rated power, suggesting that what motor effects do occur with this protocol may not be directly related to the construct of power. [Burgmer, P., &Englich, B. (2012). Bullseye!: How Power Improves Motor Performance. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4(2), 224-232.].

No MeSH data available.


Online Mirror Tracing Task.The task displayed two rectangular canvases: the bottom canvas was the “drawing pad” where the participant actually moved the cursor; the top canvas was the “mirror” which showed an image of the figure to trace and which produced a mirrored-trail of the path of mouse movement on the drawing canvas. A) To start the task, participants moved the cursor into a green start box on the drawing pad and click the mouse. This caused the mirrored cursor to come into register with the beginning of the figure. B) Once the trial was initiated, all mouse movements within the drawing pad produced a colored, mirrored trail in the mirror. To illustrate, the dotted line shows the path of the cursor straight down in the drawing pad, the corresponding mirrored trail straight up in the mirror. The trail left is colored red when within the figure to trace, blue when within. The current score is shown just below the drawing pad. C) The trial finished when the red target is reached. In this case, the score achieved is 72%. Participants could move directly to the target, but this would yield a very low score. A demonstration of this task is posted online at: http://tinyurl.com/mirror-task; source code is posted to the Open Science Framework.
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pone.0140806.g002: Online Mirror Tracing Task.The task displayed two rectangular canvases: the bottom canvas was the “drawing pad” where the participant actually moved the cursor; the top canvas was the “mirror” which showed an image of the figure to trace and which produced a mirrored-trail of the path of mouse movement on the drawing canvas. A) To start the task, participants moved the cursor into a green start box on the drawing pad and click the mouse. This caused the mirrored cursor to come into register with the beginning of the figure. B) Once the trial was initiated, all mouse movements within the drawing pad produced a colored, mirrored trail in the mirror. To illustrate, the dotted line shows the path of the cursor straight down in the drawing pad, the corresponding mirrored trail straight up in the mirror. The trail left is colored red when within the figure to trace, blue when within. The current score is shown just below the drawing pad. C) The trial finished when the red target is reached. In this case, the score achieved is 72%. Participants could move directly to the target, but this would yield a very low score. A demonstration of this task is posted online at: http://tinyurl.com/mirror-task; source code is posted to the Open Science Framework.

Mentions: Mirror Tracing Task: As a dependent measure we developed an online mirror-tracing task using JavaScript and HTML5 (Fig 2). The display had two rectangular canvases—the top canvas was the ‘mirror’ and the bottom canvas was the ‘drawing pad’. When the participant moved the cursor within the drawing pad, it produced an inverted trail on the mirror but left no marks on the canvas. In each trial, the mirror presented a different complex line drawing, and the participant’s goal was to trace the drawing as precisely as possible within a 2-minute/trial time limit. The trial and timer would begin with the participant moving the cursor into a start-box on the drawing pad, and would conclude upon reaching an end box marked on the screen. If the end box had not been reached within 2 minutes, the trial was terminated and the current score recorded as final. In each trial, the line drawing to be traced varied, but always had the same line thickness, same number of edges, and the same total drawing distance. A demonstration of this task is posted online at: http://tinyurl.com/mirror-task; source code is posted to the Open Science Framework.


Direct and Conceptual Replications of Burgmer & Englich (2012): Power May Have Little to No Effect on Motor Performance.

Cusack M, Vezenkova N, Gottschalk C, Calin-Jageman RJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Online Mirror Tracing Task.The task displayed two rectangular canvases: the bottom canvas was the “drawing pad” where the participant actually moved the cursor; the top canvas was the “mirror” which showed an image of the figure to trace and which produced a mirrored-trail of the path of mouse movement on the drawing canvas. A) To start the task, participants moved the cursor into a green start box on the drawing pad and click the mouse. This caused the mirrored cursor to come into register with the beginning of the figure. B) Once the trial was initiated, all mouse movements within the drawing pad produced a colored, mirrored trail in the mirror. To illustrate, the dotted line shows the path of the cursor straight down in the drawing pad, the corresponding mirrored trail straight up in the mirror. The trail left is colored red when within the figure to trace, blue when within. The current score is shown just below the drawing pad. C) The trial finished when the red target is reached. In this case, the score achieved is 72%. Participants could move directly to the target, but this would yield a very low score. A demonstration of this task is posted online at: http://tinyurl.com/mirror-task; source code is posted to the Open Science Framework.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633206&req=5

pone.0140806.g002: Online Mirror Tracing Task.The task displayed two rectangular canvases: the bottom canvas was the “drawing pad” where the participant actually moved the cursor; the top canvas was the “mirror” which showed an image of the figure to trace and which produced a mirrored-trail of the path of mouse movement on the drawing canvas. A) To start the task, participants moved the cursor into a green start box on the drawing pad and click the mouse. This caused the mirrored cursor to come into register with the beginning of the figure. B) Once the trial was initiated, all mouse movements within the drawing pad produced a colored, mirrored trail in the mirror. To illustrate, the dotted line shows the path of the cursor straight down in the drawing pad, the corresponding mirrored trail straight up in the mirror. The trail left is colored red when within the figure to trace, blue when within. The current score is shown just below the drawing pad. C) The trial finished when the red target is reached. In this case, the score achieved is 72%. Participants could move directly to the target, but this would yield a very low score. A demonstration of this task is posted online at: http://tinyurl.com/mirror-task; source code is posted to the Open Science Framework.
Mentions: Mirror Tracing Task: As a dependent measure we developed an online mirror-tracing task using JavaScript and HTML5 (Fig 2). The display had two rectangular canvases—the top canvas was the ‘mirror’ and the bottom canvas was the ‘drawing pad’. When the participant moved the cursor within the drawing pad, it produced an inverted trail on the mirror but left no marks on the canvas. In each trial, the mirror presented a different complex line drawing, and the participant’s goal was to trace the drawing as precisely as possible within a 2-minute/trial time limit. The trial and timer would begin with the participant moving the cursor into a start-box on the drawing pad, and would conclude upon reaching an end box marked on the screen. If the end box had not been reached within 2 minutes, the trial was terminated and the current score recorded as final. In each trial, the line drawing to be traced varied, but always had the same line thickness, same number of edges, and the same total drawing distance. A demonstration of this task is posted online at: http://tinyurl.com/mirror-task; source code is posted to the Open Science Framework.

Bottom Line: Overall, we found little to no effect of power on motor skill (d = 0.09, 95% CI[-0.07, 0.22], n = 603).None of these secondary analyses revealed a strong effect of power on performance.Unfortunately, the pattern of performance changes we observed was unrelated to group differences in perceived and rated power, suggesting that what motor effects do occur with this protocol may not be directly related to the construct of power. [Burgmer, P., &Englich, B. (2012).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Dominican University, River Forest, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Burgmer and Englich (2012) have reported that manipulating feelings of power can substantially improve performance on two motor tasks: golf and darts. We conducted two high-powered direct replications of the effects of power on golf, two online conceptual replications using mirror-tracing as a performance measure, and an additional conceptual replication using a cognitive performance measure (word-search). Overall, we found little to no effect of power on motor skill (d = 0.09, 95% CI[-0.07, 0.22], n = 603). We varied task difficulty, re-analyzed data without participants showing weak responses on manipulation checks, and tried adjusting performance scores for age, gender, and initial task skill. None of these secondary analyses revealed a strong effect of power on performance. A meta-analysis integrating our data with Burgmer & Englich leaves open the possibility that manipulating power could provide a modest boost in motor skill (d = 0.19, 95% CI [0.001, 0.38], n = 685). Unfortunately, the pattern of performance changes we observed was unrelated to group differences in perceived and rated power, suggesting that what motor effects do occur with this protocol may not be directly related to the construct of power. [Burgmer, P., &Englich, B. (2012). Bullseye!: How Power Improves Motor Performance. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4(2), 224-232.].

No MeSH data available.