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Gender Differentials in Self-Rated Health and Self-Reported Disability among Adults in India.

Bora JK, Saikia N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The relative risk of reporting poor health by women was significantly higher than men (relative risk ratio: 1.660; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.430-1.927) after adjusting for socio-economic and demographic characteristics.A substantial gender differential is found in self-reported disability.This makes for an urgent call to health researchers and policy makers for gender-sensitive programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Foundation of India, Gurgaon, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The extant literature on gender differentials in health in developed countries suggests that women outlive men at all ages, but women report poorer health than men. It is well established that Indian women live longer than men, but few studies have been conducted to understand the gender dimension in self-rated health and self-reported disability. The present study investigates gender differentials in self-rated health (SRH) and self-reported disability (SRD) among adults in India, using a nationally representative data.

Methods: Using data on 10,736 respondents aged 18 and older in the 2007 WHO Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health in India, prevalence estimates of SRH are calculated separately for men and women by socio-economic and demographic characteristics. The association of SRH with gender is tested using a multinomial logistic regression method. SRD is assessed using 20 activities of daily living (ADL). Further, gender differences in total life expectancy (TLE), disability life expectancy (DLE) and the proportion of life spent with a disability at various adult ages are measured.

Results: The relative risk of reporting poor health by women was significantly higher than men (relative risk ratio: 1.660; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.430-1.927) after adjusting for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. Women reported higher prevalence of severe and extreme disability than men in 14 measures out of a total20 ADL measures. Women aged less than 60 years reported two times more than men in SRD ≥ 5 ADLs. Finally, both DLE and proportion of life spent with a disability were substantially higher for women irrespective of their ages.

Conclusion: Indian women live longer but report poorer health than men. A substantial gender differential is found in self-reported disability. This makes for an urgent call to health researchers and policy makers for gender-sensitive programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence Estimates (in percentage) of self-reported disabilities by gender and age groups, India, 2007–2008.
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pone.0141953.g001: Prevalence Estimates (in percentage) of self-reported disabilities by gender and age groups, India, 2007–2008.

Mentions: Table 3 and Fig 1 further present prevalence estimates (in percentage) in at least one, three and five self-reported disabilities by gender and age groups in India for 2007–2008. Table 3 and Fig 1 clearly suggest that a higher proportion of women suffer from disabilities in ADL in all adult age groups. However, the gender differential was the highest in the age group less than 50 and 50–59, with the percent of women reporting more than five disabilities being two times more than their male counterparts (Male: 3.9% against 8.1% female in age group <50; Male: 8.7% against 20.0% female in age group 50–59) etc.


Gender Differentials in Self-Rated Health and Self-Reported Disability among Adults in India.

Bora JK, Saikia N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Prevalence Estimates (in percentage) of self-reported disabilities by gender and age groups, India, 2007–2008.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633186&req=5

pone.0141953.g001: Prevalence Estimates (in percentage) of self-reported disabilities by gender and age groups, India, 2007–2008.
Mentions: Table 3 and Fig 1 further present prevalence estimates (in percentage) in at least one, three and five self-reported disabilities by gender and age groups in India for 2007–2008. Table 3 and Fig 1 clearly suggest that a higher proportion of women suffer from disabilities in ADL in all adult age groups. However, the gender differential was the highest in the age group less than 50 and 50–59, with the percent of women reporting more than five disabilities being two times more than their male counterparts (Male: 3.9% against 8.1% female in age group <50; Male: 8.7% against 20.0% female in age group 50–59) etc.

Bottom Line: The relative risk of reporting poor health by women was significantly higher than men (relative risk ratio: 1.660; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.430-1.927) after adjusting for socio-economic and demographic characteristics.A substantial gender differential is found in self-reported disability.This makes for an urgent call to health researchers and policy makers for gender-sensitive programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Foundation of India, Gurgaon, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The extant literature on gender differentials in health in developed countries suggests that women outlive men at all ages, but women report poorer health than men. It is well established that Indian women live longer than men, but few studies have been conducted to understand the gender dimension in self-rated health and self-reported disability. The present study investigates gender differentials in self-rated health (SRH) and self-reported disability (SRD) among adults in India, using a nationally representative data.

Methods: Using data on 10,736 respondents aged 18 and older in the 2007 WHO Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health in India, prevalence estimates of SRH are calculated separately for men and women by socio-economic and demographic characteristics. The association of SRH with gender is tested using a multinomial logistic regression method. SRD is assessed using 20 activities of daily living (ADL). Further, gender differences in total life expectancy (TLE), disability life expectancy (DLE) and the proportion of life spent with a disability at various adult ages are measured.

Results: The relative risk of reporting poor health by women was significantly higher than men (relative risk ratio: 1.660; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.430-1.927) after adjusting for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. Women reported higher prevalence of severe and extreme disability than men in 14 measures out of a total20 ADL measures. Women aged less than 60 years reported two times more than men in SRD ≥ 5 ADLs. Finally, both DLE and proportion of life spent with a disability were substantially higher for women irrespective of their ages.

Conclusion: Indian women live longer but report poorer health than men. A substantial gender differential is found in self-reported disability. This makes for an urgent call to health researchers and policy makers for gender-sensitive programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus