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Recognizing the Symptoms of Mental Illness following Concussions in the Sports Community: A Need for Improvement.

Topolovec-Vranic J, Zhang S, Wong H, Lam E, Jing R, Russell K, Cusimano MD, Canadian Brain Injury and Violence Research Te - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The proportion of identified symptoms (categorized as physical, cognitive, mental health-related and overall) as well as participant factors associated with symptom recognition were analyzed.While participants identified most of the physical (mean = 84.2% of symptoms) and cognitive (mean = 91.2% of symptoms), they on average only identified 53.5% of the mental health-related symptoms of concussions.Respondents who were older, with higher education and household income, or resided in the Northwest Territories or Alberta identified significantly more of the mental health-related symptoms listed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Trauma and Neurosurgery Program, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the awareness of concussion-related symptoms amongst members of the sports community in Canada.

Methods: A cross-sectional national electronic survey was conducted. Youth athletes, parents, coaches and medical professionals across Canada were recruited through mailing lists from sports-related opt-in marketing databases. Participants were asked to identify, from a list of options, the symptoms of a concussion. The proportion of identified symptoms (categorized as physical, cognitive, mental health-related and overall) as well as participant factors associated with symptom recognition were analyzed.

Results: The survey elicited 6,937 responses. Most of the respondents (92.1%) completed the English language survey, were male (57.7%), 35-54 years of age (61.7%), with post-secondary education (58.2%), or high reported yearly household income (>$80,000; 53.0%). There were respondents from all provinces and territories with the majority of respondents from Ontario (35.2%) or British Columbia (19.1%). While participants identified most of the physical (mean = 84.2% of symptoms) and cognitive (mean = 91.2% of symptoms), they on average only identified 53.5% of the mental health-related symptoms of concussions. Respondents who were older, with higher education and household income, or resided in the Northwest Territories or Alberta identified significantly more of the mental health-related symptoms listed.

Interpretation: While Canadian youth athletes, parents, coaches and medical professionals are able to identify most of the physical and cognitive symptoms associated with concussion, identification of mental health-related symptoms of concussion is still lagging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average proportion of concussion-related symptoms identified by survey respondents.F = 2982.24, p < .0001 Post-hoc tests were significant among pair-wise comparisons of physical, cognitive and mental symptoms.
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pone.0141699.g001: Average proportion of concussion-related symptoms identified by survey respondents.F = 2982.24, p < .0001 Post-hoc tests were significant among pair-wise comparisons of physical, cognitive and mental symptoms.

Mentions: Fig 1 summarizes the results of respondents’ identification of concussion-related symptoms. On average, the respondents identified 84.2% (95% CI: 83.8%-84.7%) of the 11 listed physical symptoms associated with concussion. Most of the respondents identified headaches (98.5%) or dizziness (96.3%) with the fewest respondents identifying neck pain (63.7%) or seizures/convulsions (69.0%).


Recognizing the Symptoms of Mental Illness following Concussions in the Sports Community: A Need for Improvement.

Topolovec-Vranic J, Zhang S, Wong H, Lam E, Jing R, Russell K, Cusimano MD, Canadian Brain Injury and Violence Research Te - PLoS ONE (2015)

Average proportion of concussion-related symptoms identified by survey respondents.F = 2982.24, p < .0001 Post-hoc tests were significant among pair-wise comparisons of physical, cognitive and mental symptoms.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633152&req=5

pone.0141699.g001: Average proportion of concussion-related symptoms identified by survey respondents.F = 2982.24, p < .0001 Post-hoc tests were significant among pair-wise comparisons of physical, cognitive and mental symptoms.
Mentions: Fig 1 summarizes the results of respondents’ identification of concussion-related symptoms. On average, the respondents identified 84.2% (95% CI: 83.8%-84.7%) of the 11 listed physical symptoms associated with concussion. Most of the respondents identified headaches (98.5%) or dizziness (96.3%) with the fewest respondents identifying neck pain (63.7%) or seizures/convulsions (69.0%).

Bottom Line: The proportion of identified symptoms (categorized as physical, cognitive, mental health-related and overall) as well as participant factors associated with symptom recognition were analyzed.While participants identified most of the physical (mean = 84.2% of symptoms) and cognitive (mean = 91.2% of symptoms), they on average only identified 53.5% of the mental health-related symptoms of concussions.Respondents who were older, with higher education and household income, or resided in the Northwest Territories or Alberta identified significantly more of the mental health-related symptoms listed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Trauma and Neurosurgery Program, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the awareness of concussion-related symptoms amongst members of the sports community in Canada.

Methods: A cross-sectional national electronic survey was conducted. Youth athletes, parents, coaches and medical professionals across Canada were recruited through mailing lists from sports-related opt-in marketing databases. Participants were asked to identify, from a list of options, the symptoms of a concussion. The proportion of identified symptoms (categorized as physical, cognitive, mental health-related and overall) as well as participant factors associated with symptom recognition were analyzed.

Results: The survey elicited 6,937 responses. Most of the respondents (92.1%) completed the English language survey, were male (57.7%), 35-54 years of age (61.7%), with post-secondary education (58.2%), or high reported yearly household income (>$80,000; 53.0%). There were respondents from all provinces and territories with the majority of respondents from Ontario (35.2%) or British Columbia (19.1%). While participants identified most of the physical (mean = 84.2% of symptoms) and cognitive (mean = 91.2% of symptoms), they on average only identified 53.5% of the mental health-related symptoms of concussions. Respondents who were older, with higher education and household income, or resided in the Northwest Territories or Alberta identified significantly more of the mental health-related symptoms listed.

Interpretation: While Canadian youth athletes, parents, coaches and medical professionals are able to identify most of the physical and cognitive symptoms associated with concussion, identification of mental health-related symptoms of concussion is still lagging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus