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Simulation Models of Leaf Area Index and Yield for Cotton Grown with Different Soil Conditioners.

Su L, Wang Q, Wang C, Shan Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Simulation models of leaf area index (LAI) and yield for cotton can provide a theoretical foundation for predicting future variations in yield.Despite significant differences in LAIs under the type and amount of soil conditioner applied, LAIm could be described by aboveground dry matter using Michaelis-Menten kinetics.Moreover, the simulation model for cotton yield based on LAIm and the harvest index presented in this work provided important theoretical insights for improving water use efficiency in cotton cultivation and for identifying optimal application rates of soil conditioners.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Sciencem, Xi'an University of Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Simulation models of leaf area index (LAI) and yield for cotton can provide a theoretical foundation for predicting future variations in yield. This paper analyses the increase in LAI and the relationships between LAI, dry matter, and yield for cotton under three soil conditioners near Korla, Xinjiang, China. Dynamic changes in cotton LAI were evaluated using modified logistic, Gaussian, modified Gaussian, log normal, and cubic polynomial models. Universal models for simulating the relative leaf area index (RLAI) were established in which the application rate of soil conditioner was used to estimate the maximum LAI (LAIm). In addition, the relationships between LAIm and dry matter mass, yield, and the harvest index were investigated, and a simulation model for yield is proposed. A feasibility analysis of the models indicated that the cubic polynomial and Gaussian models were less accurate than the other three models for simulating increases in RLAI. Despite significant differences in LAIs under the type and amount of soil conditioner applied, LAIm could be described by aboveground dry matter using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Moreover, the simulation model for cotton yield based on LAIm and the harvest index presented in this work provided important theoretical insights for improving water use efficiency in cotton cultivation and for identifying optimal application rates of soil conditioners.

No MeSH data available.


Dynamic changes in cotton LAI with GDD for the treatments.Even though the LAI in different treatments was not identical, the trends in LAI over GDD were similar for all treatments: LAI increased rapidly between 200°C and 1500°C, more gradually between 1500°C and 2000°C, and then decreased slowly.
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pone.0141835.g003: Dynamic changes in cotton LAI with GDD for the treatments.Even though the LAI in different treatments was not identical, the trends in LAI over GDD were similar for all treatments: LAI increased rapidly between 200°C and 1500°C, more gradually between 1500°C and 2000°C, and then decreased slowly.

Mentions: The dynamic changes in the LAI of cotton grown over GDD for different treatments of soil conditioners are shown in Fig 3. LAI varied significantly amongst the treatments. The trend in LAI over the growing season, however, was similar for all treatments.


Simulation Models of Leaf Area Index and Yield for Cotton Grown with Different Soil Conditioners.

Su L, Wang Q, Wang C, Shan Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Dynamic changes in cotton LAI with GDD for the treatments.Even though the LAI in different treatments was not identical, the trends in LAI over GDD were similar for all treatments: LAI increased rapidly between 200°C and 1500°C, more gradually between 1500°C and 2000°C, and then decreased slowly.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633134&req=5

pone.0141835.g003: Dynamic changes in cotton LAI with GDD for the treatments.Even though the LAI in different treatments was not identical, the trends in LAI over GDD were similar for all treatments: LAI increased rapidly between 200°C and 1500°C, more gradually between 1500°C and 2000°C, and then decreased slowly.
Mentions: The dynamic changes in the LAI of cotton grown over GDD for different treatments of soil conditioners are shown in Fig 3. LAI varied significantly amongst the treatments. The trend in LAI over the growing season, however, was similar for all treatments.

Bottom Line: Simulation models of leaf area index (LAI) and yield for cotton can provide a theoretical foundation for predicting future variations in yield.Despite significant differences in LAIs under the type and amount of soil conditioner applied, LAIm could be described by aboveground dry matter using Michaelis-Menten kinetics.Moreover, the simulation model for cotton yield based on LAIm and the harvest index presented in this work provided important theoretical insights for improving water use efficiency in cotton cultivation and for identifying optimal application rates of soil conditioners.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Sciencem, Xi'an University of Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Simulation models of leaf area index (LAI) and yield for cotton can provide a theoretical foundation for predicting future variations in yield. This paper analyses the increase in LAI and the relationships between LAI, dry matter, and yield for cotton under three soil conditioners near Korla, Xinjiang, China. Dynamic changes in cotton LAI were evaluated using modified logistic, Gaussian, modified Gaussian, log normal, and cubic polynomial models. Universal models for simulating the relative leaf area index (RLAI) were established in which the application rate of soil conditioner was used to estimate the maximum LAI (LAIm). In addition, the relationships between LAIm and dry matter mass, yield, and the harvest index were investigated, and a simulation model for yield is proposed. A feasibility analysis of the models indicated that the cubic polynomial and Gaussian models were less accurate than the other three models for simulating increases in RLAI. Despite significant differences in LAIs under the type and amount of soil conditioner applied, LAIm could be described by aboveground dry matter using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Moreover, the simulation model for cotton yield based on LAIm and the harvest index presented in this work provided important theoretical insights for improving water use efficiency in cotton cultivation and for identifying optimal application rates of soil conditioners.

No MeSH data available.