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Development and Validation of the Body Size Scale for Assessing Body Weight Perception in African Populations.

Cohen E, Bernard JY, Ponty A, Ndao A, Amougou N, Saïd-Mohamed R, Pasquet P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This study aimed to develop and validate the Body Size Scale (BSS) to estimate African body weight perception.Test-retest reliability was consistent in estimating CBS, DBS and the "body self-satisfaction index." The CBS was highly correlated to the objective BMI, and two different indexes assessed with the BSS were consistent with declarations obtained in interviews.The validation protocol proved its reliability for estimating body weight perception in Africans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS, UMI 3189 «Environnement, Santé, Société», Faculté de Médecine Secteur Nord, Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: The social valorisation of overweight in African populations could promote high-risk eating behaviours and therefore become a risk factor of obesity. However, existing scales to assess body image are usually not accurate enough to allow comparative studies of body weight perception in different African populations. This study aimed to develop and validate the Body Size Scale (BSS) to estimate African body weight perception.

Methods: Anthropometric measures of 80 Cameroonians and 81 Senegalese were used to evaluate three criteria of adiposity: body mass index (BMI), overall percentage of fat, and endomorphy (fat component of the somatotype). To develop the BSS, the participants were photographed in full face and profile positions. Models were selected for their representativeness of the wide variability in adiposity with a progressive increase along the scale. Then, for the validation protocol, participants self-administered the BSS to assess self-perceived current body size (CBS), desired body size (DBS) and provide a "body self-satisfaction index." This protocol included construct validity, test-retest reliability and convergent validity and was carried out with three independent samples of respectively 201, 103 and 1115 Cameroonians.

Results: The BSS comprises two sex-specific scales of photos of 9 models each, and ordered by increasing adiposity. Most participants were able to correctly order the BSS by increasing adiposity, using three different words to define body size. Test-retest reliability was consistent in estimating CBS, DBS and the "body self-satisfaction index." The CBS was highly correlated to the objective BMI, and two different indexes assessed with the BSS were consistent with declarations obtained in interviews.

Conclusion: The BSS is the first scale with photos of real African models taken in both full face and profile and representing a wide and representative variability in adiposity. The validation protocol proved its reliability for estimating body weight perception in Africans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Somatotype profiles of male candidates as models for the BSS.In somatocharts, mesomorphy is represented by the vertical axis pointing upward; endomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the left; and ectomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the right. The red squares represent Cameroonian males and the purple ones Senegalese males. The red circle indicates the mean profile for Cameroonians and the purple one the mean profile for Senegalese.
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pone.0138983.g001: Somatotype profiles of male candidates as models for the BSS.In somatocharts, mesomorphy is represented by the vertical axis pointing upward; endomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the left; and ectomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the right. The red squares represent Cameroonian males and the purple ones Senegalese males. The red circle indicates the mean profile for Cameroonians and the purple one the mean profile for Senegalese.

Mentions: S1 Table shows the anthropometric characteristics of the screened participants in the BSS development. In males, the Senegalese were 6 cm taller (p < 0.001) and had lower BMI (p < 0.01) and waist circumference (p < 0.001) than Cameroonians. In females, the Senegalese were 5 cm taller (p < 0.001), and had a lower BMI than Cameroonians (p < 0.05). Overall, Senegalese had a lower degree of mesomorphy (p < 0.001 for males, p < 0.05 for females) and a higher degree of ectomorphy (p < 0.001 for males, p < 0.01 for females). These results on the participants’ somatotypes are summed up by the somatocharts in Figs 1and 2, for males and females respectively. The Cameroonian males were more likely to be mesomorph or endomorph, while Senegalese males were more likely to be mesomorph or ectomorph (p < 0.001). In females, differences were less pronounced since both Cameroonians and Senegalese were situated between endomorphy and mesomorphy, despite a subgroup shifted to the central and ectomorph region, especially among Senegalese females (p < 0.05).


Development and Validation of the Body Size Scale for Assessing Body Weight Perception in African Populations.

Cohen E, Bernard JY, Ponty A, Ndao A, Amougou N, Saïd-Mohamed R, Pasquet P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Somatotype profiles of male candidates as models for the BSS.In somatocharts, mesomorphy is represented by the vertical axis pointing upward; endomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the left; and ectomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the right. The red squares represent Cameroonian males and the purple ones Senegalese males. The red circle indicates the mean profile for Cameroonians and the purple one the mean profile for Senegalese.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633130&req=5

pone.0138983.g001: Somatotype profiles of male candidates as models for the BSS.In somatocharts, mesomorphy is represented by the vertical axis pointing upward; endomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the left; and ectomorphy by the horizontal axis pointing to the right. The red squares represent Cameroonian males and the purple ones Senegalese males. The red circle indicates the mean profile for Cameroonians and the purple one the mean profile for Senegalese.
Mentions: S1 Table shows the anthropometric characteristics of the screened participants in the BSS development. In males, the Senegalese were 6 cm taller (p < 0.001) and had lower BMI (p < 0.01) and waist circumference (p < 0.001) than Cameroonians. In females, the Senegalese were 5 cm taller (p < 0.001), and had a lower BMI than Cameroonians (p < 0.05). Overall, Senegalese had a lower degree of mesomorphy (p < 0.001 for males, p < 0.05 for females) and a higher degree of ectomorphy (p < 0.001 for males, p < 0.01 for females). These results on the participants’ somatotypes are summed up by the somatocharts in Figs 1and 2, for males and females respectively. The Cameroonian males were more likely to be mesomorph or endomorph, while Senegalese males were more likely to be mesomorph or ectomorph (p < 0.001). In females, differences were less pronounced since both Cameroonians and Senegalese were situated between endomorphy and mesomorphy, despite a subgroup shifted to the central and ectomorph region, especially among Senegalese females (p < 0.05).

Bottom Line: This study aimed to develop and validate the Body Size Scale (BSS) to estimate African body weight perception.Test-retest reliability was consistent in estimating CBS, DBS and the "body self-satisfaction index." The CBS was highly correlated to the objective BMI, and two different indexes assessed with the BSS were consistent with declarations obtained in interviews.The validation protocol proved its reliability for estimating body weight perception in Africans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS, UMI 3189 «Environnement, Santé, Société», Faculté de Médecine Secteur Nord, Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: The social valorisation of overweight in African populations could promote high-risk eating behaviours and therefore become a risk factor of obesity. However, existing scales to assess body image are usually not accurate enough to allow comparative studies of body weight perception in different African populations. This study aimed to develop and validate the Body Size Scale (BSS) to estimate African body weight perception.

Methods: Anthropometric measures of 80 Cameroonians and 81 Senegalese were used to evaluate three criteria of adiposity: body mass index (BMI), overall percentage of fat, and endomorphy (fat component of the somatotype). To develop the BSS, the participants were photographed in full face and profile positions. Models were selected for their representativeness of the wide variability in adiposity with a progressive increase along the scale. Then, for the validation protocol, participants self-administered the BSS to assess self-perceived current body size (CBS), desired body size (DBS) and provide a "body self-satisfaction index." This protocol included construct validity, test-retest reliability and convergent validity and was carried out with three independent samples of respectively 201, 103 and 1115 Cameroonians.

Results: The BSS comprises two sex-specific scales of photos of 9 models each, and ordered by increasing adiposity. Most participants were able to correctly order the BSS by increasing adiposity, using three different words to define body size. Test-retest reliability was consistent in estimating CBS, DBS and the "body self-satisfaction index." The CBS was highly correlated to the objective BMI, and two different indexes assessed with the BSS were consistent with declarations obtained in interviews.

Conclusion: The BSS is the first scale with photos of real African models taken in both full face and profile and representing a wide and representative variability in adiposity. The validation protocol proved its reliability for estimating body weight perception in Africans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus