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The Use of an Invasive Species Habitat by a Small Folivorous Primate: Implications for Lemur Conservation in Madagascar.

Eppley TM, Donati G, Ramanamanjato JB, Randriatafika F, Andriamandimbiarisoa LN, Rabehevitra D, Ravelomanantsoa R, Ganzhorn JU - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We sought to understand the role of this invasive Melaleuca swamp on the behavioral ecology of a threatened, small-bodied folivore, the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis).Our results confirm Melaleuca swamp as an important part of their home range: while lemurs seasonally limited activities to certain habitats, all groups were capable of utilizing this invasive habitat for feeding and resting.Furthermore, the fact that Hapalemur use an invasive plant species as a dispersal corridor increases our knowledge of their ecological flexibility, and may be useful in the conservation management of remaining threatened populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biozentrum Grindel, Department of Animal Ecology and Conservation, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The lemurs of Madagascar are among the most threatened mammalian taxa in the world, with habitat loss due to shifting cultivation and timber harvest heavily contributing to their precarious state. Deforestation often leads to fragmentation, resulting in mixed-habitat matrices throughout a landscape where disturbed areas are prone to invasion by exotic plants. Our study site, the Mandena littoral forest (southeast Madagascar), is a matrix of littoral forest, littoral swamp, and Melaleuca swamp habitats. Here, Melaleuca quinquenervia has invaded the wetland ecosystem, creating a mono-dominant habitat that currently provides the only potential habitat corridor between forest fragments. We sought to understand the role of this invasive Melaleuca swamp on the behavioral ecology of a threatened, small-bodied folivore, the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). We collected botanical and behavioral data on four groups of H. meridionalis between January and December 2013. Our results confirm Melaleuca swamp as an important part of their home range: while lemurs seasonally limited activities to certain habitats, all groups were capable of utilizing this invasive habitat for feeding and resting. Furthermore, the fact that Hapalemur use an invasive plant species as a dispersal corridor increases our knowledge of their ecological flexibility, and may be useful in the conservation management of remaining threatened populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Monthly total precipitation (mm), mean temperature (°C), and mean day length (h) at Mandena in 2013.
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pone.0140981.g002: Monthly total precipitation (mm), mean temperature (°C), and mean day length (h) at Mandena in 2013.

Mentions: During our study period, temperature (°C) was recorded in 30-mins intervals using Lascar EL-USB-1 data loggers, operated by custom software (EasyLog USB Version 5.45, Lascar Electronics). Precipitation (mm) was measured daily at 6:00h using a rain gauge placed within the study site (Fig 2). Day length (a proxy for season) was calculated as the time between sunrise and sunset, as obtained from the US Naval Observatory Astronomical Calendar (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data), using geographic coordinates for Mandena.


The Use of an Invasive Species Habitat by a Small Folivorous Primate: Implications for Lemur Conservation in Madagascar.

Eppley TM, Donati G, Ramanamanjato JB, Randriatafika F, Andriamandimbiarisoa LN, Rabehevitra D, Ravelomanantsoa R, Ganzhorn JU - PLoS ONE (2015)

Monthly total precipitation (mm), mean temperature (°C), and mean day length (h) at Mandena in 2013.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4633110&req=5

pone.0140981.g002: Monthly total precipitation (mm), mean temperature (°C), and mean day length (h) at Mandena in 2013.
Mentions: During our study period, temperature (°C) was recorded in 30-mins intervals using Lascar EL-USB-1 data loggers, operated by custom software (EasyLog USB Version 5.45, Lascar Electronics). Precipitation (mm) was measured daily at 6:00h using a rain gauge placed within the study site (Fig 2). Day length (a proxy for season) was calculated as the time between sunrise and sunset, as obtained from the US Naval Observatory Astronomical Calendar (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data), using geographic coordinates for Mandena.

Bottom Line: We sought to understand the role of this invasive Melaleuca swamp on the behavioral ecology of a threatened, small-bodied folivore, the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis).Our results confirm Melaleuca swamp as an important part of their home range: while lemurs seasonally limited activities to certain habitats, all groups were capable of utilizing this invasive habitat for feeding and resting.Furthermore, the fact that Hapalemur use an invasive plant species as a dispersal corridor increases our knowledge of their ecological flexibility, and may be useful in the conservation management of remaining threatened populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biozentrum Grindel, Department of Animal Ecology and Conservation, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The lemurs of Madagascar are among the most threatened mammalian taxa in the world, with habitat loss due to shifting cultivation and timber harvest heavily contributing to their precarious state. Deforestation often leads to fragmentation, resulting in mixed-habitat matrices throughout a landscape where disturbed areas are prone to invasion by exotic plants. Our study site, the Mandena littoral forest (southeast Madagascar), is a matrix of littoral forest, littoral swamp, and Melaleuca swamp habitats. Here, Melaleuca quinquenervia has invaded the wetland ecosystem, creating a mono-dominant habitat that currently provides the only potential habitat corridor between forest fragments. We sought to understand the role of this invasive Melaleuca swamp on the behavioral ecology of a threatened, small-bodied folivore, the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). We collected botanical and behavioral data on four groups of H. meridionalis between January and December 2013. Our results confirm Melaleuca swamp as an important part of their home range: while lemurs seasonally limited activities to certain habitats, all groups were capable of utilizing this invasive habitat for feeding and resting. Furthermore, the fact that Hapalemur use an invasive plant species as a dispersal corridor increases our knowledge of their ecological flexibility, and may be useful in the conservation management of remaining threatened populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus