Limits...
Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis.

Kim DM, Zhang H, Zhou H, Du T, Wu Q, Mockler TC, Berezin MY - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants.We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm.Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110.

ABSTRACT
The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices - a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529 nm/1416 nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Images and histograms obtained using traditional indices.(a) WBI index 900 nm/970 nm. The common range of values for green vegetation is 0.8 to 1.2. (b) Moisture Stress Index (MSI) = 1599 nm/819 nm. The common range for green vegetation is 0.4 to 2. (c) Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) = (857 nm–1241 nm)/(857 nm + 1241 nm). The common range for green vegetation is −0.1 to 0.4. Left leaf −12 h post detachment, right leaf −2 h post detachment. The images correspond to the histogram within specified red and green boundaries and correspond to the scale of intensities.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4632122&req=5

f9: Images and histograms obtained using traditional indices.(a) WBI index 900 nm/970 nm. The common range of values for green vegetation is 0.8 to 1.2. (b) Moisture Stress Index (MSI) = 1599 nm/819 nm. The common range for green vegetation is 0.4 to 2. (c) Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) = (857 nm–1241 nm)/(857 nm + 1241 nm). The common range for green vegetation is −0.1 to 0.4. Left leaf −12 h post detachment, right leaf −2 h post detachment. The images correspond to the histogram within specified red and green boundaries and correspond to the scale of intensities.

Mentions: The WBI is a reflectance measurement that is sensitive to changes in canopy water content323334. The WBI-based image of 2 h and 12 h leaves presented marginal visual contrast between the two (Fig. 9a). Accordingly, the histogram featured almost a monomodal distribution and providing a low contrast value of DB = 0.181.


Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis.

Kim DM, Zhang H, Zhou H, Du T, Wu Q, Mockler TC, Berezin MY - Sci Rep (2015)

Images and histograms obtained using traditional indices.(a) WBI index 900 nm/970 nm. The common range of values for green vegetation is 0.8 to 1.2. (b) Moisture Stress Index (MSI) = 1599 nm/819 nm. The common range for green vegetation is 0.4 to 2. (c) Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) = (857 nm–1241 nm)/(857 nm + 1241 nm). The common range for green vegetation is −0.1 to 0.4. Left leaf −12 h post detachment, right leaf −2 h post detachment. The images correspond to the histogram within specified red and green boundaries and correspond to the scale of intensities.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4632122&req=5

f9: Images and histograms obtained using traditional indices.(a) WBI index 900 nm/970 nm. The common range of values for green vegetation is 0.8 to 1.2. (b) Moisture Stress Index (MSI) = 1599 nm/819 nm. The common range for green vegetation is 0.4 to 2. (c) Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) = (857 nm–1241 nm)/(857 nm + 1241 nm). The common range for green vegetation is −0.1 to 0.4. Left leaf −12 h post detachment, right leaf −2 h post detachment. The images correspond to the histogram within specified red and green boundaries and correspond to the scale of intensities.
Mentions: The WBI is a reflectance measurement that is sensitive to changes in canopy water content323334. The WBI-based image of 2 h and 12 h leaves presented marginal visual contrast between the two (Fig. 9a). Accordingly, the histogram featured almost a monomodal distribution and providing a low contrast value of DB = 0.181.

Bottom Line: Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants.We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm.Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110.

ABSTRACT
The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices - a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529 nm/1416 nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus