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Evolutionary Fate of the Androgen Receptor-Signaling Pathway in Ray-Finned Fishes with a Special Focus on Cichlids.

Lorin T, Salzburger W, Böhne A - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Bottom Line: In one particular fish lineage, the cichlids, we find evidence for differing selection pressures acting on teleost-specific whole-genome duplication paralogs at a derived evolutionary stage.We then look into the expression of these duplicated genes in four cichlid species from Lake Tanganyika indicating, once more, rapid changes in expression patterns in closely related fish species.We focus on a particular case, the cichlid specific duplication of the rac1 GTPase, which shows possible signs of a neofunctionalization event.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENS (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Lyon Cedex 07, France Zoological Institute, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Basel, 4051 Basel, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.


Expression patterns for teleost-specific whole-genome duplication duplicates of the androgen receptor−signaling pathway in four Lake Tanganyika cichlids, A. burtoni, E. cyanostictus, J. ornatus, and O. ventralis. Gene expression levels in fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads were compared for the two copies of each gene within three different tissues and considered significantly differentially expressed with a p-value < 0.05 (two-sided Welch t-test; see Table S4 for details). Grouping to functional classes indicated below the expression patterns is according to Figure 2. The dotted box highlights the GTPase rac1a, which is the only gene for which one paralog is always overexpressed in all tissues and all species studied.
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fig4: Expression patterns for teleost-specific whole-genome duplication duplicates of the androgen receptor−signaling pathway in four Lake Tanganyika cichlids, A. burtoni, E. cyanostictus, J. ornatus, and O. ventralis. Gene expression levels in fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads were compared for the two copies of each gene within three different tissues and considered significantly differentially expressed with a p-value < 0.05 (two-sided Welch t-test; see Table S4 for details). Grouping to functional classes indicated below the expression patterns is according to Figure 2. The dotted box highlights the GTPase rac1a, which is the only gene for which one paralog is always overexpressed in all tissues and all species studied.

Mentions: Gene duplicates seem to experience different selection regimes even at derived evolutionary stages as in the here investigated cichlids. Previously, we showed that cichlids have a high turnover in gene expression patterns (Böhne et al. 2014). Hence, we next focused on expression differences of TSGD paralogs and the more recent lineage-specific duplication of rac1a in three tissues, brain, ovary, and testis. For this analysis, we used the RNA-sequencing data set of Böhne et al. (2014), which comprises four Lake Tanganyika cichlids (Figure 4), including again A. burtoni, for which the entire genome sequence is available (Brawand et al. 2014) and included in our sequence analyses.


Evolutionary Fate of the Androgen Receptor-Signaling Pathway in Ray-Finned Fishes with a Special Focus on Cichlids.

Lorin T, Salzburger W, Böhne A - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Expression patterns for teleost-specific whole-genome duplication duplicates of the androgen receptor−signaling pathway in four Lake Tanganyika cichlids, A. burtoni, E. cyanostictus, J. ornatus, and O. ventralis. Gene expression levels in fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads were compared for the two copies of each gene within three different tissues and considered significantly differentially expressed with a p-value < 0.05 (two-sided Welch t-test; see Table S4 for details). Grouping to functional classes indicated below the expression patterns is according to Figure 2. The dotted box highlights the GTPase rac1a, which is the only gene for which one paralog is always overexpressed in all tissues and all species studied.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4632047&req=5

fig4: Expression patterns for teleost-specific whole-genome duplication duplicates of the androgen receptor−signaling pathway in four Lake Tanganyika cichlids, A. burtoni, E. cyanostictus, J. ornatus, and O. ventralis. Gene expression levels in fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads were compared for the two copies of each gene within three different tissues and considered significantly differentially expressed with a p-value < 0.05 (two-sided Welch t-test; see Table S4 for details). Grouping to functional classes indicated below the expression patterns is according to Figure 2. The dotted box highlights the GTPase rac1a, which is the only gene for which one paralog is always overexpressed in all tissues and all species studied.
Mentions: Gene duplicates seem to experience different selection regimes even at derived evolutionary stages as in the here investigated cichlids. Previously, we showed that cichlids have a high turnover in gene expression patterns (Böhne et al. 2014). Hence, we next focused on expression differences of TSGD paralogs and the more recent lineage-specific duplication of rac1a in three tissues, brain, ovary, and testis. For this analysis, we used the RNA-sequencing data set of Böhne et al. (2014), which comprises four Lake Tanganyika cichlids (Figure 4), including again A. burtoni, for which the entire genome sequence is available (Brawand et al. 2014) and included in our sequence analyses.

Bottom Line: In one particular fish lineage, the cichlids, we find evidence for differing selection pressures acting on teleost-specific whole-genome duplication paralogs at a derived evolutionary stage.We then look into the expression of these duplicated genes in four cichlid species from Lake Tanganyika indicating, once more, rapid changes in expression patterns in closely related fish species.We focus on a particular case, the cichlid specific duplication of the rac1 GTPase, which shows possible signs of a neofunctionalization event.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENS (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Lyon Cedex 07, France Zoological Institute, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Basel, 4051 Basel, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.