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Self-healing of early age cracks in cement-based materials by mineralization of carbonic anhydrase microorganism

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

This research investigated the self-healing potential of early age cracks in cement-based materials incorporating the bacteria which can produce carbonic anhydrase. Cement-based materials specimens were pre-cracked at the age of 7, 14, 28, 60 days to study the repair ability influenced by cracking time, the width of cracks were between 0.1 and 1.0 mm to study the healing rate influenced by width of cracks. The experimental results indicated that the bacteria showed excellent repairing ability to small cracks formed at early age of 7 days, cracks below 0.4 mm was almost completely closed. The repair effect reduced with the increasing of cracking age. Cracks width influenced self-healing effectiveness significantly. The transportation of CO2and Ca2+ controlled the self-healing process. The computer simulation analyses revealed the self-healing process and mechanism of microbiologically precipitation induced by bacteria and the depth of precipitated CaCO3 could be predicted base on valid Ca2+.

No MeSH data available.


Influence of different self-healing agent on flexural strength restoration of specimens.
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Figure 8: Influence of different self-healing agent on flexural strength restoration of specimens.

Mentions: Moreover, the flexural strength of specimens with different self-healing agent after repaired was tested. The results of the flexural strength for the repaired specimens were shown in Figure 8. Compared to the normalized strength of specimens G1, G2, and G3, the normalized strength of specimens G4 with nutrient and bacteria at the same times reached to 2.1. The results indicated that the flexural strength of specimens repaired with nutrient and bacteria could be increased 40, 90.9, and 110% than other self-healing agent (G3, G2, and G1), respectively.


Self-healing of early age cracks in cement-based materials by mineralization of carbonic anhydrase microorganism
Influence of different self-healing agent on flexural strength restoration of specimens.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631987&req=5

Figure 8: Influence of different self-healing agent on flexural strength restoration of specimens.
Mentions: Moreover, the flexural strength of specimens with different self-healing agent after repaired was tested. The results of the flexural strength for the repaired specimens were shown in Figure 8. Compared to the normalized strength of specimens G1, G2, and G3, the normalized strength of specimens G4 with nutrient and bacteria at the same times reached to 2.1. The results indicated that the flexural strength of specimens repaired with nutrient and bacteria could be increased 40, 90.9, and 110% than other self-healing agent (G3, G2, and G1), respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

This research investigated the self-healing potential of early age cracks in cement-based materials incorporating the bacteria which can produce carbonic anhydrase. Cement-based materials specimens were pre-cracked at the age of 7, 14, 28, 60 days to study the repair ability influenced by cracking time, the width of cracks were between 0.1 and 1.0 mm to study the healing rate influenced by width of cracks. The experimental results indicated that the bacteria showed excellent repairing ability to small cracks formed at early age of 7 days, cracks below 0.4 mm was almost completely closed. The repair effect reduced with the increasing of cracking age. Cracks width influenced self-healing effectiveness significantly. The transportation of CO2and Ca2+ controlled the self-healing process. The computer simulation analyses revealed the self-healing process and mechanism of microbiologically precipitation induced by bacteria and the depth of precipitated CaCO3 could be predicted base on valid Ca2+.

No MeSH data available.