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Growth habit and leaf economics determine gas exchange responses to high elevation in an evergreen tree, a deciduous shrub and a herbaceous annual.

Shi Z, Haworth M, Feng Q, Cheng R, Centritto M - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we investigated the effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) on three montane species with contrasting growth habits and leaf economic strategies.The lower Gs and Gm values of evergreen species at higher elevations currently constrains their rates of A.We argue that climate change may affect plant species that compose high-elevation ecosystems differently depending on phenotypic plasticity and adaptive traits affecting leaf economics, as rising [CO2] is likely to benefit evergreen species with thick sclerophyllous leaves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection, Key Laboratory on Forest Ecology and Environmental Sciences of State Forestry Administration, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m a.s.l. on photosynthetic, morphological and compositional characteristics of Q. spinosa, S. atopantha and R. dentatus from this study and Q. aquifolioides from the study of Feng et al. (2013). Error bars indicate 1 SE.
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PLV115F5: Relative effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m a.s.l. on photosynthetic, morphological and compositional characteristics of Q. spinosa, S. atopantha and R. dentatus from this study and Q. aquifolioides from the study of Feng et al. (2013). Error bars indicate 1 SE.

Mentions: The results of this study have indicated the coordination of photosynthetic, gas exchange and morphological foliar responses to growth at high elevations of 2500 and 3500 m a.s.l. Nonetheless, two generally divergent responses to increased elevation become apparent from the study between the evergreen Quercus species with leaf lifespans of 1–3 years, and S. atopantha and R. dentatus that possess foliage with a leaf lifespan of <9 months. To illustrate these contrasting leaf responses to increased elevation, the relative changes of the physiological, morphological and compositional responses were plotted in Fig. 5. These suggest that the sclerophyllous Quercus species generally reduce conductance to CO2 and photosynthetic capacity with an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m a.s.l., while the shorter-lived foliage of S. atopantha and R. dentatus showed the opposite response.Figure 5.


Growth habit and leaf economics determine gas exchange responses to high elevation in an evergreen tree, a deciduous shrub and a herbaceous annual.

Shi Z, Haworth M, Feng Q, Cheng R, Centritto M - AoB Plants (2015)

Relative effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m a.s.l. on photosynthetic, morphological and compositional characteristics of Q. spinosa, S. atopantha and R. dentatus from this study and Q. aquifolioides from the study of Feng et al. (2013). Error bars indicate 1 SE.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631907&req=5

PLV115F5: Relative effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m a.s.l. on photosynthetic, morphological and compositional characteristics of Q. spinosa, S. atopantha and R. dentatus from this study and Q. aquifolioides from the study of Feng et al. (2013). Error bars indicate 1 SE.
Mentions: The results of this study have indicated the coordination of photosynthetic, gas exchange and morphological foliar responses to growth at high elevations of 2500 and 3500 m a.s.l. Nonetheless, two generally divergent responses to increased elevation become apparent from the study between the evergreen Quercus species with leaf lifespans of 1–3 years, and S. atopantha and R. dentatus that possess foliage with a leaf lifespan of <9 months. To illustrate these contrasting leaf responses to increased elevation, the relative changes of the physiological, morphological and compositional responses were plotted in Fig. 5. These suggest that the sclerophyllous Quercus species generally reduce conductance to CO2 and photosynthetic capacity with an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m a.s.l., while the shorter-lived foliage of S. atopantha and R. dentatus showed the opposite response.Figure 5.

Bottom Line: Here, we investigated the effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) on three montane species with contrasting growth habits and leaf economic strategies.The lower Gs and Gm values of evergreen species at higher elevations currently constrains their rates of A.We argue that climate change may affect plant species that compose high-elevation ecosystems differently depending on phenotypic plasticity and adaptive traits affecting leaf economics, as rising [CO2] is likely to benefit evergreen species with thick sclerophyllous leaves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection, Key Laboratory on Forest Ecology and Environmental Sciences of State Forestry Administration, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus