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Growth habit and leaf economics determine gas exchange responses to high elevation in an evergreen tree, a deciduous shrub and a herbaceous annual.

Shi Z, Haworth M, Feng Q, Cheng R, Centritto M - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we investigated the effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) on three montane species with contrasting growth habits and leaf economic strategies.The lower Gs and Gm values of evergreen species at higher elevations currently constrains their rates of A.We argue that climate change may affect plant species that compose high-elevation ecosystems differently depending on phenotypic plasticity and adaptive traits affecting leaf economics, as rising [CO2] is likely to benefit evergreen species with thick sclerophyllous leaves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection, Key Laboratory on Forest Ecology and Environmental Sciences of State Forestry Administration, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration (Narea) and parameters of physiological photosynthetic capacity (Amax, Vcmax and Jmax) of Q. spinosa (upward triangles), S. atopantha (circles) and R. dentatus (squares) grown at high elevations of 2500 m (open symbols) and 3500 m (filled symbols) a.s.l. Quercus spinosa: (A) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.285, F1,45 = 3.195, P = 0.112); (D) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.394, F1,45 = 5.197, P = 0.0521) and (G) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.310, F1,45 = 3.589, P = 0.0948). Salix atopantha: (B) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.633, F1,45 = 17.216, P = 0.00198); (E) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.604, F1,45 = 15.260, P = 0.00293) and (H) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.550, F1,45 = 12.236, P = 0.00575). Rumex dentatus: (C) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.919, F1,45 = 113.380, P = 8.914 × 10−07); (F) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.639, F1,45 = 17.7124, P = 0.00180) and (I) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.596, F1,45 = 14.733, P = 0.00327).
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PLV115F4: Relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration (Narea) and parameters of physiological photosynthetic capacity (Amax, Vcmax and Jmax) of Q. spinosa (upward triangles), S. atopantha (circles) and R. dentatus (squares) grown at high elevations of 2500 m (open symbols) and 3500 m (filled symbols) a.s.l. Quercus spinosa: (A) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.285, F1,45 = 3.195, P = 0.112); (D) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.394, F1,45 = 5.197, P = 0.0521) and (G) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.310, F1,45 = 3.589, P = 0.0948). Salix atopantha: (B) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.633, F1,45 = 17.216, P = 0.00198); (E) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.604, F1,45 = 15.260, P = 0.00293) and (H) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.550, F1,45 = 12.236, P = 0.00575). Rumex dentatus: (C) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.919, F1,45 = 113.380, P = 8.914 × 10−07); (F) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.639, F1,45 = 17.7124, P = 0.00180) and (I) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.596, F1,45 = 14.733, P = 0.00327).

Mentions: The photosynthetic capacity of a leaf is generally related to the concentration of nitrogen within the foliage (Evans 1989). Both S. atopantha and R. dentatus showed increases in leaf nitrogen alongside Amax, Vcmax and Jmax with elevation (Fig. 4). Despite exhibiting reduced photosynthetic capacity and a 57 % increase in nitrogen concentration at higher elevations, Q. spinosa showed no significant relationship between leaf nitrogen and Amax, Vcmax and Jmax. The PNUE values of S. atopantha and R. dentatus increased by 79.4 and 16.7 % at the higher elevation, while Q. spinosa showed a 69.2 % reduction of PNUE at 3500 m a.s.l. All three species showed increased foliar nitrogen concentration at the higher elevation, but this did not correspond to an increase in SLA (Table 3). While the evergreen Q. spinosa and annual herb R. dentatus showed respective reductions of 13.0 and 31.5 % in SLA at higher elevation, the SLA of S. atopantha was relatively unchanged. Growth at the higher elevation of 3500 m resulted in significant increases of 5.3–10.2 % in the foliar δ13C of all three species. The δ13C values of the plants from 2500 m a.s.l. were significantly enriched in the heavier 13C isotope relative to C3 plants growing at sea level (approximately +1–2‰) (Körner et al. 1988), and this enrichment in 13C became more pronounced at 3500 m a.s.l. (approximately +3–4‰).Table 3.


Growth habit and leaf economics determine gas exchange responses to high elevation in an evergreen tree, a deciduous shrub and a herbaceous annual.

Shi Z, Haworth M, Feng Q, Cheng R, Centritto M - AoB Plants (2015)

Relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration (Narea) and parameters of physiological photosynthetic capacity (Amax, Vcmax and Jmax) of Q. spinosa (upward triangles), S. atopantha (circles) and R. dentatus (squares) grown at high elevations of 2500 m (open symbols) and 3500 m (filled symbols) a.s.l. Quercus spinosa: (A) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.285, F1,45 = 3.195, P = 0.112); (D) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.394, F1,45 = 5.197, P = 0.0521) and (G) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.310, F1,45 = 3.589, P = 0.0948). Salix atopantha: (B) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.633, F1,45 = 17.216, P = 0.00198); (E) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.604, F1,45 = 15.260, P = 0.00293) and (H) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.550, F1,45 = 12.236, P = 0.00575). Rumex dentatus: (C) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.919, F1,45 = 113.380, P = 8.914 × 10−07); (F) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.639, F1,45 = 17.7124, P = 0.00180) and (I) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.596, F1,45 = 14.733, P = 0.00327).
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PLV115F4: Relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration (Narea) and parameters of physiological photosynthetic capacity (Amax, Vcmax and Jmax) of Q. spinosa (upward triangles), S. atopantha (circles) and R. dentatus (squares) grown at high elevations of 2500 m (open symbols) and 3500 m (filled symbols) a.s.l. Quercus spinosa: (A) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.285, F1,45 = 3.195, P = 0.112); (D) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.394, F1,45 = 5.197, P = 0.0521) and (G) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.310, F1,45 = 3.589, P = 0.0948). Salix atopantha: (B) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.633, F1,45 = 17.216, P = 0.00198); (E) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.604, F1,45 = 15.260, P = 0.00293) and (H) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.550, F1,45 = 12.236, P = 0.00575). Rumex dentatus: (C) Amax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.919, F1,45 = 113.380, P = 8.914 × 10−07); (F) Vcmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.639, F1,45 = 17.7124, P = 0.00180) and (I) Jmax versus Narea (regression R2 = 0.596, F1,45 = 14.733, P = 0.00327).
Mentions: The photosynthetic capacity of a leaf is generally related to the concentration of nitrogen within the foliage (Evans 1989). Both S. atopantha and R. dentatus showed increases in leaf nitrogen alongside Amax, Vcmax and Jmax with elevation (Fig. 4). Despite exhibiting reduced photosynthetic capacity and a 57 % increase in nitrogen concentration at higher elevations, Q. spinosa showed no significant relationship between leaf nitrogen and Amax, Vcmax and Jmax. The PNUE values of S. atopantha and R. dentatus increased by 79.4 and 16.7 % at the higher elevation, while Q. spinosa showed a 69.2 % reduction of PNUE at 3500 m a.s.l. All three species showed increased foliar nitrogen concentration at the higher elevation, but this did not correspond to an increase in SLA (Table 3). While the evergreen Q. spinosa and annual herb R. dentatus showed respective reductions of 13.0 and 31.5 % in SLA at higher elevation, the SLA of S. atopantha was relatively unchanged. Growth at the higher elevation of 3500 m resulted in significant increases of 5.3–10.2 % in the foliar δ13C of all three species. The δ13C values of the plants from 2500 m a.s.l. were significantly enriched in the heavier 13C isotope relative to C3 plants growing at sea level (approximately +1–2‰) (Körner et al. 1988), and this enrichment in 13C became more pronounced at 3500 m a.s.l. (approximately +3–4‰).Table 3.

Bottom Line: Here, we investigated the effect of an increase in elevation from 2500 to 3500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) on three montane species with contrasting growth habits and leaf economic strategies.The lower Gs and Gm values of evergreen species at higher elevations currently constrains their rates of A.We argue that climate change may affect plant species that compose high-elevation ecosystems differently depending on phenotypic plasticity and adaptive traits affecting leaf economics, as rising [CO2] is likely to benefit evergreen species with thick sclerophyllous leaves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection, Key Laboratory on Forest Ecology and Environmental Sciences of State Forestry Administration, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus