Limits...
Improving the optimized shea butter quality: a great potential of utilization for common consumers and industrials.

Megnanou RM, Niamke S - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: The UV-Vis spectrum showed a high peak at 300 nm and a rapid decrease from 300 to 500 nm when the near infra-red one, revealed peaks at 450, 1200, 1400, 1725 and 2150 nm for all the samples.The samples also contained essential minerals (Calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, etc.) carotene (550 ± 50 and 544 ± 50 ppm), vitamins A (0.065 ± 0.001 and 0.032 ± 0.001 µg/g) and E (2992.09 ± 1.90 and 3788.44 ± 1.90 ppm) in relatively important amounts; neither microbiological germs nor heavy were detected.All these valorizing characteristics would confer to the optimized shea butters good aptitude for exportation and exploitation in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Biotechnologies, UFR Biosciences, Université Félix Houphouët-Boigny, 22 BP 582, Abidjan 22, Côte d'Ivoire.

ABSTRACT
Industrials interest in fats as raw material, resides in their exceptional quality and potentialities of exploitation in several fields. This study aimed to exalt the optimized shea butter quality and present its wide potentialities of utilization. Hence, the characteristics of beige and yellow optimized shea butters were determined. Both samples recorded very weak acid (0.280 ± 0.001 and 0.140 ± 0.001 mgKOH/g) and peroxide (0.960 ± 0.001 and 1.010 ± 0.001 mEgO2/kg) indexes, when the iodine indexes (52.64 ± 0.20 and 53.06 ± 0.20 gI2/100 g) and the unsaponifiable matters (17.61 ± 0.01 and 17.27 ± 0.01 %) were considerable. The refractive indexes (1.454 ± 0.00 and 1.453 ± 0.00) and the pH (6.50 ± 0.30 and 6.78 ± 0.30) were statistically similar; but the specific gravity (0.915 ± 0.01-0.79 ± 0.01 and 0.94 ± 0.01-0.83 ± 0.01) and the viscosity (90.41 ± 0.20-20.02 ± 0.20 and 125.37 ± 0.20-23.55 ± 0.20 MPas) differed and decreased exponentially with the temperature increasing (35-65 °C), except for the specific gravity of the yellow butter which decreased linearly. The UV-Vis spectrum showed a high peak at 300 nm and a rapid decrease from 300 to 500 nm when the near infra-red one, revealed peaks at 450, 1200, 1400, 1725 and 2150 nm for all the samples. The chromatographic profile identified palmitic (16.42 and 26.36 %), stearic (32.39 and 36.36 %), oleic (38.12 and 29.09 %), linoleic (9.72 and 5.92 %) and arachidic (1.84 and 1.59 %) acids, and also exaltolide compound (1.51 and 0.68 %). The samples also contained essential minerals (Calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, etc.) carotene (550 ± 50 and 544 ± 50 ppm), vitamins A (0.065 ± 0.001 and 0.032 ± 0.001 µg/g) and E (2992.09 ± 1.90 and 3788.44 ± 1.90 ppm) in relatively important amounts; neither microbiological germs nor heavy were detected. All these valorizing characteristics would confer to the optimized shea butters good aptitude for exportation and exploitation in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

UV-Visible spectrum of optimized beige and yellow shea butters
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631807&req=5

Fig3: UV-Visible spectrum of optimized beige and yellow shea butters

Mentions: The spectra (Near infrared and UV–visible) of both shea butters presented, at the whole, the same profile (Figs. 3, 4); which was in general similar to those of marked and original traditional shea butter reported by Mégnanou and Niamké (2014). This similitude would suggest for both beige and yellow optimized shea butters the content in molecular bearing ethylenic bonds with conjugation and carbonyl compounds (Yadav et al. 2004). The shea butters of these authors would also contain UV-filter compounds (molecular) materialized by the rapid decrease of the absorbance (0.15–0.05 and 0.2–0.075, for yellow and beige shea butters, respectively) from 300 to 400 nm (Besbes et al. 2004). Moreover, another interesting peaks were observed at 400 nm (about the beige shea butter), and at 500 nm (for both butters); they correspond to chlorophyll (A and B) and carorenoïds wavelengths, respectively. The melting of such interesting molecular would justify the great interest of cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry for fats like shea butters, and would then constitute an advantage for using the studied shea butters in cosmetic formulations as UV protectors against carcinogenic UV A and B.Fig. 3


Improving the optimized shea butter quality: a great potential of utilization for common consumers and industrials.

Megnanou RM, Niamke S - Springerplus (2015)

UV-Visible spectrum of optimized beige and yellow shea butters
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631807&req=5

Fig3: UV-Visible spectrum of optimized beige and yellow shea butters
Mentions: The spectra (Near infrared and UV–visible) of both shea butters presented, at the whole, the same profile (Figs. 3, 4); which was in general similar to those of marked and original traditional shea butter reported by Mégnanou and Niamké (2014). This similitude would suggest for both beige and yellow optimized shea butters the content in molecular bearing ethylenic bonds with conjugation and carbonyl compounds (Yadav et al. 2004). The shea butters of these authors would also contain UV-filter compounds (molecular) materialized by the rapid decrease of the absorbance (0.15–0.05 and 0.2–0.075, for yellow and beige shea butters, respectively) from 300 to 400 nm (Besbes et al. 2004). Moreover, another interesting peaks were observed at 400 nm (about the beige shea butter), and at 500 nm (for both butters); they correspond to chlorophyll (A and B) and carorenoïds wavelengths, respectively. The melting of such interesting molecular would justify the great interest of cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry for fats like shea butters, and would then constitute an advantage for using the studied shea butters in cosmetic formulations as UV protectors against carcinogenic UV A and B.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: The UV-Vis spectrum showed a high peak at 300 nm and a rapid decrease from 300 to 500 nm when the near infra-red one, revealed peaks at 450, 1200, 1400, 1725 and 2150 nm for all the samples.The samples also contained essential minerals (Calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, etc.) carotene (550 ± 50 and 544 ± 50 ppm), vitamins A (0.065 ± 0.001 and 0.032 ± 0.001 µg/g) and E (2992.09 ± 1.90 and 3788.44 ± 1.90 ppm) in relatively important amounts; neither microbiological germs nor heavy were detected.All these valorizing characteristics would confer to the optimized shea butters good aptitude for exportation and exploitation in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Biotechnologies, UFR Biosciences, Université Félix Houphouët-Boigny, 22 BP 582, Abidjan 22, Côte d'Ivoire.

ABSTRACT
Industrials interest in fats as raw material, resides in their exceptional quality and potentialities of exploitation in several fields. This study aimed to exalt the optimized shea butter quality and present its wide potentialities of utilization. Hence, the characteristics of beige and yellow optimized shea butters were determined. Both samples recorded very weak acid (0.280 ± 0.001 and 0.140 ± 0.001 mgKOH/g) and peroxide (0.960 ± 0.001 and 1.010 ± 0.001 mEgO2/kg) indexes, when the iodine indexes (52.64 ± 0.20 and 53.06 ± 0.20 gI2/100 g) and the unsaponifiable matters (17.61 ± 0.01 and 17.27 ± 0.01 %) were considerable. The refractive indexes (1.454 ± 0.00 and 1.453 ± 0.00) and the pH (6.50 ± 0.30 and 6.78 ± 0.30) were statistically similar; but the specific gravity (0.915 ± 0.01-0.79 ± 0.01 and 0.94 ± 0.01-0.83 ± 0.01) and the viscosity (90.41 ± 0.20-20.02 ± 0.20 and 125.37 ± 0.20-23.55 ± 0.20 MPas) differed and decreased exponentially with the temperature increasing (35-65 °C), except for the specific gravity of the yellow butter which decreased linearly. The UV-Vis spectrum showed a high peak at 300 nm and a rapid decrease from 300 to 500 nm when the near infra-red one, revealed peaks at 450, 1200, 1400, 1725 and 2150 nm for all the samples. The chromatographic profile identified palmitic (16.42 and 26.36 %), stearic (32.39 and 36.36 %), oleic (38.12 and 29.09 %), linoleic (9.72 and 5.92 %) and arachidic (1.84 and 1.59 %) acids, and also exaltolide compound (1.51 and 0.68 %). The samples also contained essential minerals (Calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, etc.) carotene (550 ± 50 and 544 ± 50 ppm), vitamins A (0.065 ± 0.001 and 0.032 ± 0.001 µg/g) and E (2992.09 ± 1.90 and 3788.44 ± 1.90 ppm) in relatively important amounts; neither microbiological germs nor heavy were detected. All these valorizing characteristics would confer to the optimized shea butters good aptitude for exportation and exploitation in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus