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Silica Gel for Enhanced Activity and Hypochlorite Protection of Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase in Recombinant Escherichia coli.

Radian A, Aukema KG, Aksan A, Wackett LP - MBio (2015)

Bottom Line: APTES coating or encapsulation of cells had two benefits: (i) overcoming diffusion limitations imposed by the cell wall and (ii) protecting against hypochlorite inactivation of CAH activity.APTES-encapsulated E. coli cells expressing CAH degraded cyanuric acid at high rates in the presence of 1 to 10 ppm hypochlorite, showing effectiveness under swimming pool conditions.Methods for promoting whole-cell biocatalysis are important in biotechnology, and the present work illustrates approaches to enhance rates and protect against an inhibitory substance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BioTechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of cyanuric acid (CYA) degradation rates by cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH) from Moorella thermoacetica expressed in E. coli and tested as cell extract, whole-cell, and encapsulated cell forms. The three treatments are 0.025 g of E. coli expressing CAH or the equivalent amount of cell-free CAH in the following: TEOS gel (black circles), freely suspended cells (white squares), or lysed cells (gray squares). The means ± standard deviations (error bars) of three replicate experiments were calculated, but the standard deviations are smaller than the symbols for most measurements and thus are not visible.
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fig1: Comparison of cyanuric acid (CYA) degradation rates by cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH) from Moorella thermoacetica expressed in E. coli and tested as cell extract, whole-cell, and encapsulated cell forms. The three treatments are 0.025 g of E. coli expressing CAH or the equivalent amount of cell-free CAH in the following: TEOS gel (black circles), freely suspended cells (white squares), or lysed cells (gray squares). The means ± standard deviations (error bars) of three replicate experiments were calculated, but the standard deviations are smaller than the symbols for most measurements and thus are not visible.

Mentions: Initially, the effects of diffusion on CAH degradation were assessed by measuring the rate of enzymatic activity with comparable levels of CAH enzyme contained within TEOS-encapsulated cells, free cells in solution, and soluble CAH enzyme (Fig. 1). To make the data directly comparable, each sample contained 0.025 g of cells or the amount of enzyme contained within 0.025 g of cells.


Silica Gel for Enhanced Activity and Hypochlorite Protection of Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase in Recombinant Escherichia coli.

Radian A, Aukema KG, Aksan A, Wackett LP - MBio (2015)

Comparison of cyanuric acid (CYA) degradation rates by cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH) from Moorella thermoacetica expressed in E. coli and tested as cell extract, whole-cell, and encapsulated cell forms. The three treatments are 0.025 g of E. coli expressing CAH or the equivalent amount of cell-free CAH in the following: TEOS gel (black circles), freely suspended cells (white squares), or lysed cells (gray squares). The means ± standard deviations (error bars) of three replicate experiments were calculated, but the standard deviations are smaller than the symbols for most measurements and thus are not visible.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631802&req=5

fig1: Comparison of cyanuric acid (CYA) degradation rates by cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH) from Moorella thermoacetica expressed in E. coli and tested as cell extract, whole-cell, and encapsulated cell forms. The three treatments are 0.025 g of E. coli expressing CAH or the equivalent amount of cell-free CAH in the following: TEOS gel (black circles), freely suspended cells (white squares), or lysed cells (gray squares). The means ± standard deviations (error bars) of three replicate experiments were calculated, but the standard deviations are smaller than the symbols for most measurements and thus are not visible.
Mentions: Initially, the effects of diffusion on CAH degradation were assessed by measuring the rate of enzymatic activity with comparable levels of CAH enzyme contained within TEOS-encapsulated cells, free cells in solution, and soluble CAH enzyme (Fig. 1). To make the data directly comparable, each sample contained 0.025 g of cells or the amount of enzyme contained within 0.025 g of cells.

Bottom Line: APTES coating or encapsulation of cells had two benefits: (i) overcoming diffusion limitations imposed by the cell wall and (ii) protecting against hypochlorite inactivation of CAH activity.APTES-encapsulated E. coli cells expressing CAH degraded cyanuric acid at high rates in the presence of 1 to 10 ppm hypochlorite, showing effectiveness under swimming pool conditions.Methods for promoting whole-cell biocatalysis are important in biotechnology, and the present work illustrates approaches to enhance rates and protect against an inhibitory substance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BioTechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus