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The cervical cancer prevention programme in Costa Rica.

Rojas IQ - Ecancermedicalscience (2015)

Bottom Line: This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas.Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women's health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women's rights to life and health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Coordinación Técnica del Cáncer, Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social, San José, Costa Rica.

ABSTRACT
Cervical and uterine cancer continues to be an important issue for women around the world, although neoplasia has the greatest demonstrated potential for prevention. Costa Rica has achieved important advances in the reduction of the incidence and mortality of these cancers since the last century. This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas. Increased access for women to care in health centres, fundamentally at the primary level, has been vital, as has ensuring the quality of cytology readings and access to diagnosis and treatment for precursor lesions for in situ and invasive cancers. Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women's health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women's rights to life and health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Five-year mortality rates due to cervical cancer by region, Costa Rica, 2007–2011. (gross rate per 100,000 women).
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figure6: Five-year mortality rates due to cervical cancer by region, Costa Rica, 2007–2011. (gross rate per 100,000 women).

Mentions: Although global rates have been reduced, there is a different pattern in the seven provinces. In Table 1, the disparities among the same are evident. While in Cartago, for each 3.6 cases of cancer in situ diagnosed, one invasive case is diagnosed, in Guanacaste, the rate is one to one, and in Limón, it is inverted, with 1.6 cases of invasive cancer diagnosed for each case of cancer in situ. As can be observed on the map (Figure 6), the coastal regions are most affected, as they correspond to the provinces with the highest number of deaths due to this neoplasia.


The cervical cancer prevention programme in Costa Rica.

Rojas IQ - Ecancermedicalscience (2015)

Five-year mortality rates due to cervical cancer by region, Costa Rica, 2007–2011. (gross rate per 100,000 women).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631572&req=5

figure6: Five-year mortality rates due to cervical cancer by region, Costa Rica, 2007–2011. (gross rate per 100,000 women).
Mentions: Although global rates have been reduced, there is a different pattern in the seven provinces. In Table 1, the disparities among the same are evident. While in Cartago, for each 3.6 cases of cancer in situ diagnosed, one invasive case is diagnosed, in Guanacaste, the rate is one to one, and in Limón, it is inverted, with 1.6 cases of invasive cancer diagnosed for each case of cancer in situ. As can be observed on the map (Figure 6), the coastal regions are most affected, as they correspond to the provinces with the highest number of deaths due to this neoplasia.

Bottom Line: This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas.Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women's health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women's rights to life and health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Coordinación Técnica del Cáncer, Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social, San José, Costa Rica.

ABSTRACT
Cervical and uterine cancer continues to be an important issue for women around the world, although neoplasia has the greatest demonstrated potential for prevention. Costa Rica has achieved important advances in the reduction of the incidence and mortality of these cancers since the last century. This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas. Increased access for women to care in health centres, fundamentally at the primary level, has been vital, as has ensuring the quality of cytology readings and access to diagnosis and treatment for precursor lesions for in situ and invasive cancers. Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women's health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women's rights to life and health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus