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A Strontium-Modified Titanium Surface Produced by a New Method and Its Biocompatibility In Vitro.

Liu C, Zhang Y, Wang L, Zhang X, Chen Q, Wu B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface.Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces.The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Stomatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, P. R. China; College of Stomatology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To present a new and effective method of producing titanium surfaces modified with strontium and to investigate the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surfaces modified with strontium (Sr) for bone implant applications.

Materials and methods: Sr-modified Ti surfaces were produced by sequential treatments with NaOH, strontium acetate, heat and water. The surface characteristics and the concentration of the Sr ions released from the samples were examined. Cell adhesion, morphology and growth were investigated using osteoblasts isolated from the calvaria of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats. Expression of osteogenesis-related genes and proteins was examined to assess the effect of the Sr-modified Ti surfaces on osteoblasts.

Results: The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface. The hydrophilicity was enhanced by the incorporation of Sr ions and water treatment. The average amounts of Sr released from the Sr-modified plates subjected to water treatment were slight higher than the plates without water treatment. Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces. The Sr-modified Ti plates also promoted expression of osteogenesis-related genes,and expression of OPN and COL-І by osteoblasts. Ti plates heat treated at 700°C showed increased bioactivity in comparison with those treated at 600°C. Water treatment upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes.

Conclusions: These results show that Sr-modification of Ti surfaces may improve bioactivity in vitro. Water treatment has enhanced the response of osteoblasts. The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cell growth on the different surfaces at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days analyzed by CCK-8 assay.(*P< 0.05 Ti, **P < 0.01 vs Ti; # P< 0.05, ##P< 0.01, ###P< 0.001 vs Sr600; $P< 0.05, $ $P< 0.01, $ $ $P< 0.001 vs Sr600W).
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pone.0140669.g005: Cell growth on the different surfaces at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days analyzed by CCK-8 assay.(*P< 0.05 Ti, **P < 0.01 vs Ti; # P< 0.05, ##P< 0.01, ###P< 0.001 vs Sr600; $P< 0.05, $ $P< 0.01, $ $ $P< 0.001 vs Sr600W).

Mentions: Cell morphology is closely related to the function of osteoblasts. After 24h, differences in cell shape could be observed(Fig 4). The cells on the Sr-modified surfaces were more extended than those on Ti surfaces, while there was no significant difference in cell spreading among the Sr-modified surfaces. Initial cell adhesion is known to be the key step controlling cell proliferation and differentiation on biomaterials[36]. Adhesion of osteoblasts to the different surfaces was determined after 1, 2 and 4 h (Fig 5). The number of adherent cells increased with time on all five surfaces. Cell adhesion was significantly higher on the Sr-modified surfaces than on Ti at all time-points. There was no obvious difference in the initial adherent cell number on plates before and after water treatment. The number of adherent cells on the Sr700W surfaces was significantly higher than on the Sr600 and Sr600W surfaces at 1 h and 4 h.


A Strontium-Modified Titanium Surface Produced by a New Method and Its Biocompatibility In Vitro.

Liu C, Zhang Y, Wang L, Zhang X, Chen Q, Wu B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cell growth on the different surfaces at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days analyzed by CCK-8 assay.(*P< 0.05 Ti, **P < 0.01 vs Ti; # P< 0.05, ##P< 0.01, ###P< 0.001 vs Sr600; $P< 0.05, $ $P< 0.01, $ $ $P< 0.001 vs Sr600W).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631518&req=5

pone.0140669.g005: Cell growth on the different surfaces at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days analyzed by CCK-8 assay.(*P< 0.05 Ti, **P < 0.01 vs Ti; # P< 0.05, ##P< 0.01, ###P< 0.001 vs Sr600; $P< 0.05, $ $P< 0.01, $ $ $P< 0.001 vs Sr600W).
Mentions: Cell morphology is closely related to the function of osteoblasts. After 24h, differences in cell shape could be observed(Fig 4). The cells on the Sr-modified surfaces were more extended than those on Ti surfaces, while there was no significant difference in cell spreading among the Sr-modified surfaces. Initial cell adhesion is known to be the key step controlling cell proliferation and differentiation on biomaterials[36]. Adhesion of osteoblasts to the different surfaces was determined after 1, 2 and 4 h (Fig 5). The number of adherent cells increased with time on all five surfaces. Cell adhesion was significantly higher on the Sr-modified surfaces than on Ti at all time-points. There was no obvious difference in the initial adherent cell number on plates before and after water treatment. The number of adherent cells on the Sr700W surfaces was significantly higher than on the Sr600 and Sr600W surfaces at 1 h and 4 h.

Bottom Line: The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface.Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces.The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Stomatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, P. R. China; College of Stomatology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To present a new and effective method of producing titanium surfaces modified with strontium and to investigate the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surfaces modified with strontium (Sr) for bone implant applications.

Materials and methods: Sr-modified Ti surfaces were produced by sequential treatments with NaOH, strontium acetate, heat and water. The surface characteristics and the concentration of the Sr ions released from the samples were examined. Cell adhesion, morphology and growth were investigated using osteoblasts isolated from the calvaria of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats. Expression of osteogenesis-related genes and proteins was examined to assess the effect of the Sr-modified Ti surfaces on osteoblasts.

Results: The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface. The hydrophilicity was enhanced by the incorporation of Sr ions and water treatment. The average amounts of Sr released from the Sr-modified plates subjected to water treatment were slight higher than the plates without water treatment. Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces. The Sr-modified Ti plates also promoted expression of osteogenesis-related genes,and expression of OPN and COL-І by osteoblasts. Ti plates heat treated at 700°C showed increased bioactivity in comparison with those treated at 600°C. Water treatment upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes.

Conclusions: These results show that Sr-modification of Ti surfaces may improve bioactivity in vitro. Water treatment has enhanced the response of osteoblasts. The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus