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The Culture-Transmission Motive in Immigrants: A World-Wide Internet Survey.

Mchitarjan I, Reisenzein R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Support was obtained for all hypotheses.Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration.Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Educational Science, University of Greifswald, D-17487 Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A world-wide internet survey was conducted to test central assumptions of a recent theory of cultural transmission in minorities proposed by the authors. 844 1st to 2nd generation immigrants from a wide variety of countries recruited on a microjob platform completed a questionnaire designed to test eight hypotheses derived from the theory. Support was obtained for all hypotheses. In particular, evidence was obtained for the continued presence, in the immigrants, of the culture-transmission motive postulated by the theory: the desire to maintain the culture of origin and transmit it to the next generation. Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of the scale values (violin plots) of the desire, emotion and action subscales of the culture-transmission motive (CTM) measure.Higher values reflect a stronger culture-transmission motive. The white circle represents the median and the black bar the mean; the box ranges from the first to the third quartile. Answer scales were item-specific (see text).
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pone.0141625.g002: Distribution of the scale values (violin plots) of the desire, emotion and action subscales of the culture-transmission motive (CTM) measure.Higher values reflect a stronger culture-transmission motive. The white circle represents the median and the black bar the mean; the box ranges from the first to the third quartile. Answer scales were item-specific (see text).

Mentions: Hypothesis 1, in specified form, asserts that the majority of 1st to 2nd generation immigrants still have the desire to maintain and transmit their culture of origin (Table 1). This hypothesis received strong support: The means and medians of all items used to measure the culture-transmission motive were far beyond the natural zero points of the respective response scales (indicating complete absence of the motive), with means ranging from 3.58 to 5.22 and medians from 4 to 6. Parallel results were obtained for the three scales formed from the items: CTM-desire (M = 4.88; SD = 1.56; median = 5), CTM-emotion (M = 4.79; SD = 1.38; median = 4.86) and CTM-action (M = 4.11; SD = 1.69; median = 4). More detail is given in Fig 2, which shows violin plots [59] of the distribution of the scores on the three motive scales. A violin plot combines a boxplot [60] with a representation of the estimated density function of the variable (essentially a smoothed histogram), thus enriching the boxplot with more detailed information about the shape of the distribution. As can be seen, the scale values of nearly all participants were beyond the zero point of the scales and the clear majority (82%, 83% and 66%, respectively) were beyond the midpoint (3.5).


The Culture-Transmission Motive in Immigrants: A World-Wide Internet Survey.

Mchitarjan I, Reisenzein R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Distribution of the scale values (violin plots) of the desire, emotion and action subscales of the culture-transmission motive (CTM) measure.Higher values reflect a stronger culture-transmission motive. The white circle represents the median and the black bar the mean; the box ranges from the first to the third quartile. Answer scales were item-specific (see text).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631500&req=5

pone.0141625.g002: Distribution of the scale values (violin plots) of the desire, emotion and action subscales of the culture-transmission motive (CTM) measure.Higher values reflect a stronger culture-transmission motive. The white circle represents the median and the black bar the mean; the box ranges from the first to the third quartile. Answer scales were item-specific (see text).
Mentions: Hypothesis 1, in specified form, asserts that the majority of 1st to 2nd generation immigrants still have the desire to maintain and transmit their culture of origin (Table 1). This hypothesis received strong support: The means and medians of all items used to measure the culture-transmission motive were far beyond the natural zero points of the respective response scales (indicating complete absence of the motive), with means ranging from 3.58 to 5.22 and medians from 4 to 6. Parallel results were obtained for the three scales formed from the items: CTM-desire (M = 4.88; SD = 1.56; median = 5), CTM-emotion (M = 4.79; SD = 1.38; median = 4.86) and CTM-action (M = 4.11; SD = 1.69; median = 4). More detail is given in Fig 2, which shows violin plots [59] of the distribution of the scores on the three motive scales. A violin plot combines a boxplot [60] with a representation of the estimated density function of the variable (essentially a smoothed histogram), thus enriching the boxplot with more detailed information about the shape of the distribution. As can be seen, the scale values of nearly all participants were beyond the zero point of the scales and the clear majority (82%, 83% and 66%, respectively) were beyond the midpoint (3.5).

Bottom Line: Support was obtained for all hypotheses.Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration.Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Educational Science, University of Greifswald, D-17487 Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A world-wide internet survey was conducted to test central assumptions of a recent theory of cultural transmission in minorities proposed by the authors. 844 1st to 2nd generation immigrants from a wide variety of countries recruited on a microjob platform completed a questionnaire designed to test eight hypotheses derived from the theory. Support was obtained for all hypotheses. In particular, evidence was obtained for the continued presence, in the immigrants, of the culture-transmission motive postulated by the theory: the desire to maintain the culture of origin and transmit it to the next generation. Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus