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The Culture-Transmission Motive in Immigrants: A World-Wide Internet Survey.

Mchitarjan I, Reisenzein R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Support was obtained for all hypotheses.Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration.Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Educational Science, University of Greifswald, D-17487 Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A world-wide internet survey was conducted to test central assumptions of a recent theory of cultural transmission in minorities proposed by the authors. 844 1st to 2nd generation immigrants from a wide variety of countries recruited on a microjob platform completed a questionnaire designed to test eight hypotheses derived from the theory. Support was obtained for all hypotheses. In particular, evidence was obtained for the continued presence, in the immigrants, of the culture-transmission motive postulated by the theory: the desire to maintain the culture of origin and transmit it to the next generation. Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of participants living in, and stemming from, different countries.
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pone.0141625.g001: Number of participants living in, and stemming from, different countries.

Mentions: 620 of the 844 participants were men and 224 women, with a mean age of 27.6 years (SD = 8.4). The immigrants were living in 59 different countries, 22 of which contributed more than 10 participants (see Fig 1). Duration of stay in the country of residence was on average M = 14.8 years (SD = 10.5).


The Culture-Transmission Motive in Immigrants: A World-Wide Internet Survey.

Mchitarjan I, Reisenzein R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Number of participants living in, and stemming from, different countries.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631500&req=5

pone.0141625.g001: Number of participants living in, and stemming from, different countries.
Mentions: 620 of the 844 participants were men and 224 women, with a mean age of 27.6 years (SD = 8.4). The immigrants were living in 59 different countries, 22 of which contributed more than 10 participants (see Fig 1). Duration of stay in the country of residence was on average M = 14.8 years (SD = 10.5).

Bottom Line: Support was obtained for all hypotheses.Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration.Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Educational Science, University of Greifswald, D-17487 Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A world-wide internet survey was conducted to test central assumptions of a recent theory of cultural transmission in minorities proposed by the authors. 844 1st to 2nd generation immigrants from a wide variety of countries recruited on a microjob platform completed a questionnaire designed to test eight hypotheses derived from the theory. Support was obtained for all hypotheses. In particular, evidence was obtained for the continued presence, in the immigrants, of the culture-transmission motive postulated by the theory: the desire to maintain the culture of origin and transmit it to the next generation. Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus