Limits...
Associations of White Matter Microstructure with Clinical and Demographic Characteristics in Heavy Drinkers.

Monnig MA, Yeo RA, Tonigan JS, McCrady BS, Thoma RJ, Sabbineni A, Hutchison KE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A common white matter factor was created from fractional anisotropy (FA) values of five white matter tracts: body of corpus callosum, fornix, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulate gyrus.The effect of drinking frequency differed significantly for men and women, such that higher drinking frequency was linked to lower white matter factor scores in women but not in men.In conclusion, alcohol problem severity was a significant predictor of lower white matter FA in heavy drinkers, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Damage to the brain's white matter is a signature injury of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), yet understanding of risks associated with clinical and demographic characteristics is incomplete. This study investigated alcohol problem severity, recent drinking behavior, and demographic factors in relation to white matter microstructure in heavy drinkers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), were collected from 324 participants (mean age = 30.9 ± 9.1 years; 30% female) who reported five or more heavy drinking episodes in the past 30 days. Drinking history and alcohol problem severity were assessed. A common white matter factor was created from fractional anisotropy (FA) values of five white matter tracts: body of corpus callosum, fornix, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulate gyrus. Previous research has implicated these tracts in heavy drinking. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses tested the hypothesis that, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure, clinical and behavioral measures of alcohol use severity would be associated with lower white matter factor scores. Potential interactions with smoking status, gender, age, treatment-seeking status, and depression or anxiety symptoms also were tested. Controlling for number of years drinking, greater alcohol problem severity and recent drinking frequency were significantly associated with lower white matter factor scores. The effect of drinking frequency differed significantly for men and women, such that higher drinking frequency was linked to lower white matter factor scores in women but not in men. In conclusion, alcohol problem severity was a significant predictor of lower white matter FA in heavy drinkers, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure. In addition, more frequent drinking contributed to lower FA in women but not men, suggesting gender-specific vulnerability to alcohol neurotoxicity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatterplots of PDD and WMF score by gender.Data are shown in upper panel for males and in lower panel for females. Gender was a significant moderator of the indirect effect of years drinking to WMF through PDD. R2 = .011 for men; R2 = .280 for women.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631485&req=5

pone.0142042.g004: Scatterplots of PDD and WMF score by gender.Data are shown in upper panel for males and in lower panel for females. Gender was a significant moderator of the indirect effect of years drinking to WMF through PDD. R2 = .011 for men; R2 = .280 for women.

Mentions: Next, moderation mediation models tested whether mediation effects for ADS or PDD differed by treatment-seeking status, gender, age, smoking status, or comorbidity. Gender significantly moderated the path from PDD to WMF (i.e., b path; χ2 difference test p-value = .002). The path from PDD to WMF was significant for women (standardized β = -.417, p < .001) but not for men (β = -.019, p = .811), meaning that frequency of drinking had a negative effect on WMF scores only in women (Fig 4). Because some tracts normally exhibit sexual dimorphism, a post hoc analysis compared the magnitude of the independent effects of gender and PDD on WMF. In a multiple regression analysis with gender (coded male = 1, female = 2) and PDD as independent predictors, no mediators, and WMF as the outcome, both predictors were significant (gender: β = -.209, p = .001; PDD: β = -.203, p = .001). Tests of other between-group factors as moderators did not find evidence that mediation effects differed by group.


Associations of White Matter Microstructure with Clinical and Demographic Characteristics in Heavy Drinkers.

Monnig MA, Yeo RA, Tonigan JS, McCrady BS, Thoma RJ, Sabbineni A, Hutchison KE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Scatterplots of PDD and WMF score by gender.Data are shown in upper panel for males and in lower panel for females. Gender was a significant moderator of the indirect effect of years drinking to WMF through PDD. R2 = .011 for men; R2 = .280 for women.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631485&req=5

pone.0142042.g004: Scatterplots of PDD and WMF score by gender.Data are shown in upper panel for males and in lower panel for females. Gender was a significant moderator of the indirect effect of years drinking to WMF through PDD. R2 = .011 for men; R2 = .280 for women.
Mentions: Next, moderation mediation models tested whether mediation effects for ADS or PDD differed by treatment-seeking status, gender, age, smoking status, or comorbidity. Gender significantly moderated the path from PDD to WMF (i.e., b path; χ2 difference test p-value = .002). The path from PDD to WMF was significant for women (standardized β = -.417, p < .001) but not for men (β = -.019, p = .811), meaning that frequency of drinking had a negative effect on WMF scores only in women (Fig 4). Because some tracts normally exhibit sexual dimorphism, a post hoc analysis compared the magnitude of the independent effects of gender and PDD on WMF. In a multiple regression analysis with gender (coded male = 1, female = 2) and PDD as independent predictors, no mediators, and WMF as the outcome, both predictors were significant (gender: β = -.209, p = .001; PDD: β = -.203, p = .001). Tests of other between-group factors as moderators did not find evidence that mediation effects differed by group.

Bottom Line: A common white matter factor was created from fractional anisotropy (FA) values of five white matter tracts: body of corpus callosum, fornix, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulate gyrus.The effect of drinking frequency differed significantly for men and women, such that higher drinking frequency was linked to lower white matter factor scores in women but not in men.In conclusion, alcohol problem severity was a significant predictor of lower white matter FA in heavy drinkers, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Damage to the brain's white matter is a signature injury of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), yet understanding of risks associated with clinical and demographic characteristics is incomplete. This study investigated alcohol problem severity, recent drinking behavior, and demographic factors in relation to white matter microstructure in heavy drinkers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), were collected from 324 participants (mean age = 30.9 ± 9.1 years; 30% female) who reported five or more heavy drinking episodes in the past 30 days. Drinking history and alcohol problem severity were assessed. A common white matter factor was created from fractional anisotropy (FA) values of five white matter tracts: body of corpus callosum, fornix, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulate gyrus. Previous research has implicated these tracts in heavy drinking. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses tested the hypothesis that, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure, clinical and behavioral measures of alcohol use severity would be associated with lower white matter factor scores. Potential interactions with smoking status, gender, age, treatment-seeking status, and depression or anxiety symptoms also were tested. Controlling for number of years drinking, greater alcohol problem severity and recent drinking frequency were significantly associated with lower white matter factor scores. The effect of drinking frequency differed significantly for men and women, such that higher drinking frequency was linked to lower white matter factor scores in women but not in men. In conclusion, alcohol problem severity was a significant predictor of lower white matter FA in heavy drinkers, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure. In addition, more frequent drinking contributed to lower FA in women but not men, suggesting gender-specific vulnerability to alcohol neurotoxicity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus