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Relative Prevalence of Grapevine Leafroll-Associated Virus Species in Wine Grape-Growing Regions of California.

Sharma AM, Baraff B, Hutchins JT, Wong MK, Blaisdell GK, Cooper ML, Daane KM, Almeida RP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Control treatments based on plant symptoms can make it difficult to effectively manage such diseases, as the biology of the underlying pathogens can vary.Grapevine leafroll disease affects grapes worldwide, and is associated with several viral species in the family Closteroviridae.Our survey did not detect viruses associated with grapevine leafroll disease at some sites with characteristic disease symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, 94720, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Some diseases manifest as one characteristic set of symptoms to the host, but can be caused by multiple pathogens. Control treatments based on plant symptoms can make it difficult to effectively manage such diseases, as the biology of the underlying pathogens can vary. Grapevine leafroll disease affects grapes worldwide, and is associated with several viral species in the family Closteroviridae. Whereas some of the viruses associated with this disease are transmitted by insect vectors, others are only graft-transmissible. In three regions of California, we surveyed vineyards containing diseased vines and screened symptomatic plants for all known viral species associated with grapevine leafroll disease. Relative incidence of each virus species differed among the three regions regions, particularly in relation to species with known vectors compared with those only known to be graft-transmitted. In one region, the pathogen population was dominated by species not known to have an insect vector. In contrast, populations in the other surveyed regions were dominated by virus species that are vector-transmissible. Our survey did not detect viruses associated with grapevine leafroll disease at some sites with characteristic disease symptoms. This could be explained either by undescribed genetic diversity among these viruses that prevented detection with available molecular tools at the time the survey was performed, or a misidentification of visual symptoms that may have had other underlying causes. Based on the differences in relative prevalence of each virus species among regions and among vineyards within regions, we expect that region and site-specific management strategies are needed for effective disease control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative prevalence of grapevine leafroll-associated virus species by region.Data for the North Coast region were obtained from Sharma et al. 2011; GLRaV-7 was not tested in that survey. The map was generated by authors with R version 3.2.0.
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pone.0142120.g002: Relative prevalence of grapevine leafroll-associated virus species by region.Data for the North Coast region were obtained from Sharma et al. 2011; GLRaV-7 was not tested in that survey. The map was generated by authors with R version 3.2.0.

Mentions: Relative abundance of individual GLRaVs varied among regions (Fig 2). GLRaV-1 was highest in relative abundance in the Sierra Foothills, and did not significantly differ between the Central Coast and Central Valley (F = 22.09, P = 0.0004, df = 13). GLRaV-2 also had the highest relative abundance in the Sierra Foothills, and did not significantly differ between the Central Valley and Central Coast (F = 37.28, P < 0.0001, df = 13). GLRaV-3 had the highest relative abundance in the Central Coast, while its relative abundance did not significantly differ between the Central Valley and Sierra Foothills (F = 7.68, P = 0.0152, df = 13). Neither GLRaV-4LV nor GLRaV-7 were found in the Central Coast, and relative abundance of neither GLRaV-4LV (F = 4.28, P = 0.0589, df = 13) nor GLRaV-7 (F = 0.879, P = 0.667, df = 13) differed significantly between the Central Valley and Sierra Foothills.


Relative Prevalence of Grapevine Leafroll-Associated Virus Species in Wine Grape-Growing Regions of California.

Sharma AM, Baraff B, Hutchins JT, Wong MK, Blaisdell GK, Cooper ML, Daane KM, Almeida RP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relative prevalence of grapevine leafroll-associated virus species by region.Data for the North Coast region were obtained from Sharma et al. 2011; GLRaV-7 was not tested in that survey. The map was generated by authors with R version 3.2.0.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631472&req=5

pone.0142120.g002: Relative prevalence of grapevine leafroll-associated virus species by region.Data for the North Coast region were obtained from Sharma et al. 2011; GLRaV-7 was not tested in that survey. The map was generated by authors with R version 3.2.0.
Mentions: Relative abundance of individual GLRaVs varied among regions (Fig 2). GLRaV-1 was highest in relative abundance in the Sierra Foothills, and did not significantly differ between the Central Coast and Central Valley (F = 22.09, P = 0.0004, df = 13). GLRaV-2 also had the highest relative abundance in the Sierra Foothills, and did not significantly differ between the Central Valley and Central Coast (F = 37.28, P < 0.0001, df = 13). GLRaV-3 had the highest relative abundance in the Central Coast, while its relative abundance did not significantly differ between the Central Valley and Sierra Foothills (F = 7.68, P = 0.0152, df = 13). Neither GLRaV-4LV nor GLRaV-7 were found in the Central Coast, and relative abundance of neither GLRaV-4LV (F = 4.28, P = 0.0589, df = 13) nor GLRaV-7 (F = 0.879, P = 0.667, df = 13) differed significantly between the Central Valley and Sierra Foothills.

Bottom Line: Control treatments based on plant symptoms can make it difficult to effectively manage such diseases, as the biology of the underlying pathogens can vary.Grapevine leafroll disease affects grapes worldwide, and is associated with several viral species in the family Closteroviridae.Our survey did not detect viruses associated with grapevine leafroll disease at some sites with characteristic disease symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, 94720, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Some diseases manifest as one characteristic set of symptoms to the host, but can be caused by multiple pathogens. Control treatments based on plant symptoms can make it difficult to effectively manage such diseases, as the biology of the underlying pathogens can vary. Grapevine leafroll disease affects grapes worldwide, and is associated with several viral species in the family Closteroviridae. Whereas some of the viruses associated with this disease are transmitted by insect vectors, others are only graft-transmissible. In three regions of California, we surveyed vineyards containing diseased vines and screened symptomatic plants for all known viral species associated with grapevine leafroll disease. Relative incidence of each virus species differed among the three regions regions, particularly in relation to species with known vectors compared with those only known to be graft-transmitted. In one region, the pathogen population was dominated by species not known to have an insect vector. In contrast, populations in the other surveyed regions were dominated by virus species that are vector-transmissible. Our survey did not detect viruses associated with grapevine leafroll disease at some sites with characteristic disease symptoms. This could be explained either by undescribed genetic diversity among these viruses that prevented detection with available molecular tools at the time the survey was performed, or a misidentification of visual symptoms that may have had other underlying causes. Based on the differences in relative prevalence of each virus species among regions and among vineyards within regions, we expect that region and site-specific management strategies are needed for effective disease control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus